Need to advise a sitghted person


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

This is an odd one, but maybe somebody here can assist.
Basically, I needed to get some articles out of a web site so I merely highlighted the lines in firefox, and cut and pasted them into word.
Now I'm guessing that I'm using the virtual buffer of nvda to do this, as my sighted friends want to do this but say with a mouse no nvda etc and firefox it simply does not work.
So, is this true. Do we actually have an ability the sighted do not have here?
If so, then if I get them to install nvda, turn of the voice presumably they should now be able to do as I do, but will that work with the mouse or will they have to use the keyboard and possibly need the add on which shows the cursor up on screen in order to do it?
Brian

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Gene
 

If all they want to do is copy and paste text without worrying about formatting such as tables, it is not necessary to use NVDA.  and my guess is that doing so might raise a lot of problems for sighted users.  Sighted people may not see an accurate reflection of where they are on the page, according to a thread yesterday. 
 
But without using a screen-reader, they can select an entire page and copy it to the clipboard.  I've done it with no screen-reader running using control a and control c. 
 
If they want to preserve formatting, perhaps they can paste what has been copied into a word processor.  If not, they can paste it into notepad.  They can then copy and paste as they usually do. 
 
I don't know what can be done on a web page with the mouse in terms of selecting.  My suggestion is intended to give them another option if they need it. 
 
There are so many discussion forums on the Internet, why don't the people in question discuss this matter on a site with forums like Bleeping Computer.  Sighted students copy and paste all the time when writing papers.  I find it very difficult to believe that what you are discussing can't be done in some way on the web page itself..
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, November 18, 2016 2:47 AM
Subject: [nvda] Need to advise a sitghted person

This is an odd one, but maybe somebody here can assist.
 Basically, I needed to get some articles out of a web site so I merely
highlighted the lines in firefox, and cut and pasted them into word.
 Now I'm guessing that I'm using the virtual buffer of nvda to do this, as
my sighted  friends want to do this but say with a mouse no nvda etc and
firefox it simply does not work.
 So, is this true. Do we actually have an ability the sighted do not have
here?
 If so, then if I get them to install nvda, turn of the voice presumably
they should now be able to do as I do, but will that work with the mouse or
will they have to use the keyboard and possibly need the add on which shows
the cursor up on screen in order to do it?
  Brian

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Quentin Christensen
 

NVDA does give finer control with the keyboard over moving around and selecting text.  The standard way a sighted mouse user would select text in firefox however, would be to move the mouse pointer to the start of the text to be selected, click the left mouse button and hold it down, then drag the mouse to the end of the text to be selected.  At that point you can either press control+c to copy the text, or right click and choose "copy".

One difference for a sighted person if they are using a computer with NVDA running, is that control+c will only copy the text, NVDA doesn't copy images.  In that case (and assuming they want images) then right clicking and choosing copy will still copy the images.

Regards

Quentin.

On Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 7:47 PM, Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...> wrote:
This is an odd one, but maybe somebody here can assist.
Basically, I needed to get some articles out of a web site so I merely highlighted the lines in firefox, and cut and pasted them into word.
Now I'm guessing that I'm using the virtual buffer of nvda to do this, as my sighted  friends want to do this but say with a mouse no nvda etc and firefox it simply does not work.
So, is this true. Do we actually have an ability the sighted do not have here?
If so, then if I get them to install nvda, turn of the voice presumably they should now be able to do as I do, but will that work with the mouse or will they have to use the keyboard and possibly need the add on which shows the cursor up on screen in order to do it?
 Brian

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Quentin Christensen
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Direct: +61 413 904 383
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Joe Paton
 

Hi,

turn on carratt browsing with f7. May help. Otherwise the
regular copy and paste should serve you just fine.

On Fri, 18 Nov 2016 08:47:33 -0000
"Brian's Mail list account" <bglists@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

This is an odd one, but maybe somebody here can assist.
Basically, I needed to get some articles out of a web site so I merely highlighted the lines in firefox, and cut and pasted them into word.
Now I'm guessing that I'm using the virtual buffer of nvda to do this, as my sighted friends want to do this but say with a mouse no nvda etc and firefox it simply does not work.
So, is this true. Do we actually have an ability the sighted do not have here?
If so, then if I get them to install nvda, turn of the voice presumably they should now be able to do as I do, but will that work with the mouse or will they have to use the keyboard and possibly need the add on which shows the cursor up on screen in order to do it?
Brian

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Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

It depends on the web page. For some reason, these days, a lot of sites use javascript plugins to prevent copying of text from the web content. Simply turning off javascript should (in most cases) allow copy and paste as normal. Plain html has no such protections, so it shouldn't be an issue. Since NVDA needs to interpret the content on the page, it's not quite as restricted as to javascript functionality, since it has it's own buffers for content.

On 11/18/2016 3:47 AM, Brian's Mail list account wrote:
This is an odd one, but maybe somebody here can assist.
Basically, I needed to get some articles out of a web site so I merely highlighted the lines in firefox, and cut and pasted them into word.
Now I'm guessing that I'm using the virtual buffer of nvda to do this, as my sighted friends want to do this but say with a mouse no nvda etc and firefox it simply does not work.
So, is this true. Do we actually have an ability the sighted do not have here?
If so, then if I get them to install nvda, turn of the voice presumably they should now be able to do as I do, but will that work with the mouse or will they have to use the keyboard and possibly need the add on which shows the cursor up on screen in order to do it?
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.


 

If the website(s) in question can be shared I'd love to take a look at them.

As Travis has noted, there are ways to prevent copy and paste of all sorts of things on webpages, but for something like a web address to another web page I've not seen that done.  It could be a part of some other protected object that a sighted user is intentionally prevented from copying.

Going from the abstract to the actual is the only way I know of to determine what's actually happening for you that somehow isn't happening for your colleagues.  A simple copy and paste of URLs/web addresses should always work as far as if you can copy and paste them into an e-mail or document others should be able to follow those to their respective destinations.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Felix G.
 

Hello,
in Firefox, under Preferences / Advanced / General tab, there is an accessibility section. One of the check boxes it provides allows text highlighting with the keyboard. That may be what your friend is looking for.
I also often run into those situations where sighted people marvel at the efficiency of using a screen reader. A close friend of mine sometimes even turns on NVDA without speech to get the link list and the full text search, and I have known at least one sighted person who likes to have text read to her by Espeak.
Surreal but true.
Kind regards,
Felix

Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> schrieb am Fr., 18. Nov. 2016 um 17:30 Uhr:

If the website(s) in question can be shared I'd love to take a look at them.

As Travis has noted, there are ways to prevent copy and paste of all sorts of things on webpages, but for something like a web address to another web page I've not seen that done.  It could be a part of some other protected object that a sighted user is intentionally prevented from copying.

Going from the abstract to the actual is the only way I know of to determine what's actually happening for you that somehow isn't happening for your colleagues.  A simple copy and paste of URLs/web addresses should always work as far as if you can copy and paste them into an e-mail or document others should be able to follow those to their respective destinations.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



 

well on radio one of the blind djs I listen to says one of his uncles who is a truck driver or something likes to run jaws to read him his stuff so he can read the news paper while he drives his truck.

On 19/11/2016 9:40 p.m., Felix G. wrote:
Hello,
in Firefox, under Preferences / Advanced / General tab, there is an
accessibility section. One of the check boxes it provides allows text
highlighting with the keyboard. That may be what your friend is looking for.
I also often run into those situations where sighted people marvel at the
efficiency of using a screen reader. A close friend of mine sometimes even
turns on NVDA without speech to get the link list and the full text search,
and I have known at least one sighted person who likes to have text read to
her by Espeak.
Surreal but true.
Kind regards,
Felix

Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> schrieb am Fr., 18. Nov. 2016 um
17:30 Uhr:

If the website(s) in question can be shared I'd love to take a look at
them.

As Travis has noted, there are ways to prevent copy and paste of all sorts
of things on webpages, but for something like a web address to another web
page I've not seen that done. It could be a part of some other protected
object that a sighted user is intentionally prevented from copying.

Going from the abstract to the actual is the only way I know of to
determine what's actually happening for you that somehow isn't happening
for your colleagues. A simple copy and paste of URLs/web addresses should
always work as far as if you can copy and paste them into an e-mail or
document others should be able to follow those to their respective
destinations.
--
*Brian*

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If
you’re alive, it isn’t.*

~ Lauren Bacall






 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 01:41 am, Shaun Everiss wrote:
well on radio one of the blind djs I listen to says one of his uncles who is a truck driver or something likes to run jaws to read him his stuff so he can read the news paper while he drives his truck.

As a tangent on this, I also know people who prefer screen readers rather than, say, books on tape (or similar) because even the best of the new voices don't put the kind of inflections on narrative that attempts to project what they think it means or how they interpret it.    It allows someone to use their own imagination as far as how a character might be uttering a given phrase instead of having that already assigned by the human reader.

I can see how this has a certain appeal to it.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall