Anti Virus


Andrea Sherry
 

Using Windows10 Pro on 64 bit machine.

Tried a number of these: AVG, Avast, Mcaffee and others.

I have had problems with all including installation, preferences, accessing menus etc.

Is there such a beast which allows NVDA to access during installation, preferences and response to virus alerts? I'm not really interested in any freeware though I don't want to pay the earth.

Any suggestions?

Cheers

Andrea


--
Though no one can go back and make a brand new start, anyone can start from now and make a brand new ending." - Carl Brad


 

Why not just use Windows Defender, which has been Microsoft's built-in antivirus and antimalware (to an extent) program packaged with all Windows versions since Windows 8?

There is noting to install and it's probably more accessible than many third party products.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



enes sarıbaş
 

I wouldn't recommend it. It is ranked low on many independant antivirus tests. For this reason using a third party solution is probably better.

On 11/19/2016 9:09 AM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Why not just use Windows Defender, which has been Microsoft's built-in antivirus and antimalware (to an extent) program packaged with all Windows versions since Windows 8?

There is noting to install and it's probably more accessible than many third party products.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    




Roger Stewart
 

I've been using Windows Defender. Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer. This is probably why it seems to have a bad reputation. They need to fix this so it will check by itself every couple of hours.

Roger

On 11/18/2016 10:53 PM, Andrea Sherry wrote:
Using Windows10 Pro on 64 bit machine.

Tried a number of these: AVG, Avast, Mcaffee and others.

I have had problems with all including installation, preferences, accessing menus etc.

Is there such a beast which allows NVDA to access during installation, preferences and response to virus alerts? I'm not really interested in any freeware though I don't want to pay the earth.

Any suggestions?

Cheers

Andrea


William Sallander <wsallander@...>
 

I am currently using Vipre Internet Security; there are at least three different flavors for home users.

I find it to be quite accessible and as far as I saw from reviews, it was better then Defender.

Yes it is true that Windows Defender is very accessible, but when it comes to updates, you need to play with the task scheduler within Windows.

As far as protection, it's just enough to keep you out of trouble on a temperary basis, but as it stands now, I wouldn't make it the daily driver. There has been some slight improvements so stay tuned.

On 11/19/2016 11:00 AM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I've been using Windows Defender. Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer. This is probably why it seems to have a bad reputation. They need to fix this so it will check by itself every couple of hours.

Roger










On 11/18/2016 10:53 PM, Andrea Sherry wrote:
Using Windows10 Pro on 64 bit machine.

Tried a number of these: AVG, Avast, Mcaffee and others.

I have had problems with all including installation, preferences, accessing menus etc.

Is there such a beast which allows NVDA to access during installation, preferences and response to virus alerts? I'm not really interested in any freeware though I don't want to pay the earth.

Any suggestions?

Cheers

Andrea



Gene
 

That's not why Windows Defender has a bad reputation.  It is better than it used to be but still not particularly good.  See this article and if people want more information, a search for something like Windows Defender review 2016 should bring up many relevant results.
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 10:00 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

I've been using Windows Defender.  Only caution I'd give is to do a
manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is
updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once
when you start the computer.  This is probably why it seems to have a
bad reputation.  They need to fix this so it will check by itself every
couple of hours.

Roger










On 11/18/2016 10:53 PM, Andrea Sherry wrote:
> Using Windows10 Pro on 64 bit machine.
>
> Tried a number of these: AVG, Avast, Mcaffee and others.
>
> I have had problems with all including installation, preferences,
> accessing menus etc.
>
> Is there such a beast which allows NVDA to access during installation,
> preferences and response to virus alerts? I'm not really interested in
> any freeware though I don't want to pay the earth.
>
> Any suggestions?
>
> Cheers
>
> Andrea
>
>




 

Well to be honest if I ever upgrade from msse, I will either take sophos for their home 10 pc cloud protection and lowish prices.
Or vipre for their expensive 50 dollar unlimited lifetime protection licence.
I am not sure what way I want to go to be honest.
Cloud is nice while online, a lot of less stress on my system.
Also if I have a false positive and exclude it, its probably going to sync with my cloud account so hmmm will it matter that much.
On the other hand, who knows.

On 20/11/2016 5:14 a.m., William Sallander wrote:
I am currently using Vipre Internet Security; there are at least three
different flavors for home users.

I find it to be quite accessible and as far as I saw from reviews, it
was better then Defender.

Yes it is true that Windows Defender is very accessible, but when it
comes to updates, you need to play with the task scheduler within Windows.

As far as protection, it's just enough to keep you out of trouble on a
temperary basis, but as it stands now, I wouldn't make it the daily
driver. There has been some slight improvements so stay tuned.



On 11/19/2016 11:00 AM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I've been using Windows Defender. Only caution I'd give is to do a
manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database
is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself
once when you start the computer. This is probably why it seems to
have a bad reputation. They need to fix this so it will check by
itself every couple of hours.

Roger










On 11/18/2016 10:53 PM, Andrea Sherry wrote:
Using Windows10 Pro on 64 bit machine.

Tried a number of these: AVG, Avast, Mcaffee and others.

I have had problems with all including installation, preferences,
accessing menus etc.

Is there such a beast which allows NVDA to access during
installation, preferences and response to virus alerts? I'm not
really interested in any freeware though I don't want to pay the earth.

Any suggestions?

Cheers

Andrea





.


 

I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.

As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.

If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.

Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".

This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10, which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:
Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



 

I agree, the first point of security should be your head.
Next I'd use something like firefox with better privacy for flash cookies, ublock for adds, and noscript for scripts.
That way if you click malware it may not run.
To be honest I have been tempted to get more passive protection that gets stuff before it handles things.

On 20/11/2016 6:44 a.m., Brian Vogel wrote:
I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless. It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.

As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection. Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that. Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.

If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK. If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening. Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.

Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career. Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".

This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10 ( http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/632487/windows-defender-as-integral-part-of-windows-10/ ) , which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
--
*Brian*

*Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete. If you’re alive, it isn’t.*

~ Lauren Bacall


Gene
 

No matter how careful you are, you can still be infected, even by going to reputable sites if those sites are hacked or if the advertising on those sites is hacked.  Yes, people should follow good safety procedures.  but that does not minimize the need or usefulness of good antimalware programs. 
 
And no matter how careful you are, what about the moment of inattention.  I'm very careful about not opening attachments.  but even so, there was one time in perhaps fifteen years or longer, that I wasn't really thinking much about what I was doing and opened an attachment that came from a message that looked as though it was from someone I knew.  If I had been paying proper attention, I wouldn't have done so but the point is that unless you are sure that you will always be paying proper attention from now until you stop using computers, there is always a small or very small chance for error.  I've seen techs or techies minimize the importance of antimalware programs.  Frankly, I consider this to be the overconfidence of knowledge.  I believe that safety is the lesson of knowledge and experience.
 
Genee

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 11:52 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

I agree, the first point of security should be your head.
Next I'd use something like firefox with better privacy for flash
cookies, ublock for adds, and noscript for scripts.
That way if you click malware it may not run.
To be honest I have been tempted to get more passive protection that
gets stuff before it handles things.



On 20/11/2016 6:44 a.m., Brian Vogel wrote:
> I have seen virtually any antivirus or security suite you can name either praised to the high heavens or called almost completely useless.  It really depends on who's doing the reviewing and the metrics they're using.
>
> As has been said here, and elsewhere, antivirus programs are not and should not be considered your first line of defense against infection.  Your own browsing habits play a far, far greater role in that.  Good browsing hygiene will keep you quite safe, if not 100% so.
>
> If you have not been infected nor had whatever antivirus or security program you've been using report anything being quarantined in a very long time you can be reasonably certain that your browsing habits are OK.  If you're constantly infected or have things quarantined without actually having been infected it would be very wise to start looking at precisely when, how, and why this is happening.  Most infections are the direct result of user action, not some backdoor entry.
>
> Windows Defender has proven more than adequate for more users on more machines than I can count at this point in my career.   Nothing is perfect, some competitors may be better, but Windows Defender is not even close to "junk".
>
> This thread entitled, Windows Defender as an integral part of Windows 10 ( http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/632487/windows-defender-as-integral-part-of-windows-10/ ) , which just started yesterday on bleepingcomputer.com's Windows 10 Support Forum, is worth reading [disclaimer: I've got two posts in that thread so far, but that's not why I think it's worth looking at].
> --
> *Brian*
>
> *Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.*
>
>    ~ Lauren Bacall
>



Casey <cwollner@...>
 

hi are you using A screen reader with virpe?
If so what version of the internet security are you running?
Also to you like them to stick with them and how easy is it to change options in that program and when you get something that it says that maybe infected.
How easy is it to deal with that as well?
So would you recommend someone using the latest version of window-eyes to get this program and set it up and you will be fully protected.
Or do you think one should keep looking for A better product?


--
Casey


Arlene
 

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 


Gene
 

History is nothing more than a record of sites you have visited.  There is no reason to clean history unless you don't want people to know what sites you have visited.  Malware doesn't care what sites you have visited.  you can set the browser not to store pass words.  You can let cookies store them or use some sort of password manager to store them that encrypts them.  History may be useful if you visit a site and later want to eaasily go back to it when you haven't book marked it .  Also if you are worried about malware seeing your history, which is of no use to it, you should worry about your book marks as well.  Malware doesn't care about your book marks either.  If, of course, you don't want people to know where you have been, like if you are cheating on your wife and don't want her to find dating sites in your history, you would want not to keep your history.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Arlene
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:15 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 


 

Gene wrote:  "I'm very careful about not opening attachments.  but even so, there was one time in perhaps fifteen years or longer, that I wasn't really thinking much about what I was doing and opened an attachment that came from a message that looked as though it was from someone I knew."

You do realize that this proves precisely the point I was trying to make.

I have never minimized the importance of having an active antivirus or security suite running at all times.  I also encourage people to have antimalware and antispyware programs installed should they be unfortunate enough to need them and to run the occasional "just because" scans.

That being said, my point is that the precise antivirus you are using is all but irrelevant if you're someone such as yourself or you take the time to develop good browsing habits in general.  I've been on the web since it started and have never gotten an infection from any "legitimate," for lack of a better word, website and I'm like you with regard to attachments.   You are never going to be able to pick the "correct" antivirus to guarantee that the once in fifteen years situation is assured to be taken care of by that product, and it is insane to try to do so given the number of variables involved.

You must have an active antivirus or security suite running on any Windows machine that is interacting with the world at large whether by direct connection to the internet or occasional data transfers via jump drives and the like.  That's essential.    The one you pick is, very largely, a crap shoot in the grand scheme of what you might possibly encounter as an infection and pretending otherwise (which many want to do) is folly.   Developing good browsing habits will prevent virtually all infections, not absolutely all infections, and that's why you have security programs - as failsafes that you hope you never have to use.

--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 



 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 10:21 am, Gene wrote:
History is nothing more than a record of sites you have visited.

Yup.  And you're 100% correct about there being no need to clean it for security reasons.

There are all kinds of urban legends regarding security as well as information that was once correct, that has not been for years, that continues to be stated as gospel.  It's very hard to squelch, but it is worth trying.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    



Gene
 

I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer.  Most malware doesn't.  it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware.  I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability.  There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.
 
Gene 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Gene,


I asked my neighbor for proof of her computer being destroyed but she couldn't give me an answer. I had a trojan on my old computer but it didn't totally destroy it. I was able to get rid of the trojan.


Rosemarie



On 11/19/2016 10:37 AM, Gene wrote:
I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer.  Most malware doesn't.  it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware.  I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability.  There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.
 
Gene 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

Hi, Arleen,


I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.


Rosemarie




On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall

    

 




Arlene
 

Oh good. Those things are a parasite.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: November-19-16 10:42 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

Hi, Gene,

 

I asked my neighbor for proof of her computer being destroyed but she couldn't give me an answer. I had a trojan on my old computer but it didn't totally destroy it. I was able to get rid of the trojan.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

On 11/19/2016 10:37 AM, Gene wrote:

I don't know if any malware can physically damage a computer.  Most malware doesn't.  it may do all sorts of things you don't want it to do but physically destroying your computer is the least of the worries associated with malware.  I don't know anything about your neighbor's knowledge of computers but a high degree of skepticism should be maintained regarding what people tell you unless they have proven records of knowledge and reliability.  There is an enormous amount of misinformation constantly being circulated regarding computers and related matters.

 

Gene 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 12:28 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

Hi, Arleen,

 

I try to be very careful about what sites I visit. My next-door neighbor told me that one time she had a virus and it totally destroyed her computer. I don't know how she got it but she had to end up getting a brand-new computer.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

On 11/19/2016 10:15 AM, Arlene wrote:

Also, if you visit sites. Even if you have IE or firefox or edge clean out the history. You may have to manually get rid of history.  Even though you have your virus scan up to date always clean your hystery.  I have my computer not remember passwords even though it asks.  If you are on sites you login always log out.  Sites like drop box or others.  Someone in the xp days told me to always log out and I always do it. 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: November-19-16 9:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Anti Virus

 

On Sat, Nov 19, 2016 at 08:00 am, Roger Stewart wrote:

Only caution I'd give is to do a manual check for updates several times a day as their virus database is updated several times a day but the program will only check itself once when you start the computer.

 I have not found this to be the case under Windows 10.  If you open Windows Defender you can see when the last virus definition update has taken place, and that's often very recent even when I've had my machine up and running for days.

This also wasn't the case, at least if I'm recalling correctly, under Windows 8.1 either.  It would make absolutely no sense for any modern antivirus program, and Windows Defender is one, to not auto-update its own definitions and, in fact, itself as new releases are released.
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Brian

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