mouse movement


Richard Kuzma
 

There is an add in called golden cursor.

You will need sighted assistance to place the mouse where you want to mark.

Its been a while since I used it, so would have to review how it works.

Also, I took a usb mouse and covered the mouse part on the bottom that tracks the pointer around and use it just for clicking on things,

This makes it very easy to use and you don’t have to worry about moveing the pointer around when you don’t want it to move.

 


Ibrahim Ajayi
 

Hello:
Thanks for the information.
What is the keystroke for the golden cursor. I'll very much like to
try it out.
Thanks.

On 11/20/16, Richard Kuzma via Groups.Io <rmkuzma=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
There is an add in called golden cursor.

You will need sighted assistance to place the mouse where you want to mark.

Its been a while since I used it, so would have to review how it works.

Also, I took a usb mouse and covered the mouse part on the bottom that
tracks the pointer around and use it just for clicking on things,

This makes it very easy to use and you don't have to worry about moveing
the
pointer around when you don't want it to move.




Gene
 

I don't have your original message any longer but here are my answers based on my recollection of the questions. 
 
First, there is a Windows command to move to the system tray.  It is Windows key b.  Insert b is an NVDA command that reads the currently active Window. 
 
But if you want to use something that is almost identical to the JAWS system tray dialog, there is an NVDA add on you can get that does this.  The command to open the system tray dialog when you use the add on is the same as in JAWS, insert f11.  You can use either insert.  Once opened, select an item in the list and tab around the dialog to see how things are organized and what short cut commands do what.  For example, you will hear that right click is alt r. 
 
As far as mouse movement is concerned, you may want to try using the golden cursor add on.  I haven't done so and I would very strongly urge you to learn NVDA screen review commands before deciding what you want to do about the golden Cursor add on.  When you know how to move around using screen review commands, you can move the mouse to the current place you are at when using screen review by issuing the command numpad insert numpad slash.  That is, hold the numpad insert and while doing so, press numpad slash.  It's the key to the right of the numpad.  If you then want to click the mouse, press numpad slash by itself. 
 
I am giving desktop keyboard layout commands for mouse commands.  I don't use the laptop layout and I don't know those commands. 
 
I would suggest that you listen to at least part of a good tutorial on NVdA, particularly topics dealing with screen review.  you may save yourself time, trouble, and frustration if you learn in an organized manner. 
 
I'll let other list members discuss tutorials.  Joseph Lee created a very good one.  If no one else gives the link, I'll look it up and give it.  Other list members may discuss other tutorials. 
 
If you don't learn well with tutorials but you do with material in the form of a manual, you may want to learn from the user guide.  But in my experience, most computer users much prefer tutorials so that's what I'm discussing in this message.
 
Gene


David Moore
 

Hi,
I love golden cursor and use it all of the time. You can press the arrow keys to move the mouse in that direction. You don’t need sighted assistance to mark places, because here is what you can do with the golden cursor. Press windows+NVDA+P to get the pixel position of where the mouse pointer is at. The default for most screens is 1,366 pixels across, and 768 pixels down. The left is 0 and the top is 0. The X position is given and then the Y position. For example, the start button is at the position: 24 748. In other words, the mouse pointer is 24 pixels to the right of the left edge of the screen, and 748 pixels down from the top. This is almost at the very bottom left corner of the screen. You can get a very good picture of where things are on the screen by pressing that command and finding out what pixel position things are on the screen. Now, to save a pixel position, press CTRL+NVDA+L. type in the X and Y numbers without a space, and then space and write what that position is, like start bottom, for example. In other words, you would type: 24748 start button. Just press enter, and you have saved that position on the screen just like a book marker. Now, to open a list of positions you have saved, just press shift+NvDA+L and arrow to the position and press enter. The mouse pointer will go right to that position. You can access places in programs only by doing this mouse pointer movement and clicking with the mouse. You can always read with the review cursor and use object navigation as well to get to a certain place, and press numb pad insert+numb pad slash to route the mouse pointer to the review cursor. The laptop position is shift+NVDA+M to do the routing. I would like to ask right here if any work is being done on Golden Cursor, because I think that is so powerful, because you can find the position the pointer is on the screen and save that position like a book mark. That is so powerful that it makes me jump up and down. You can use your mouse or touch pad like a sighted person by using the Golden Cursor. You can also go to ease of access center and set your computer to move the mouse pointer with the mum lock turned on instead of off to use NVDA commands.
David Moore
 
 

From: Richard Kuzma via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 8:07 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] mouse movement
 

There is an add in called golden cursor.

You will need sighted assistance to place the mouse where you want to mark.

Its been a while since I used it, so would have to review how it works.

Also, I took a usb mouse and covered the mouse part on the bottom that tracks the pointer around and use it just for clicking on things,

This makes it very easy to use and you don’t have to worry about moveing the pointer around when you don’t want it to move.

 


David Moore
 

Hi,
The Golden Cursor is a NVDA add on that you can find on the add ons page. You just download it and press enter on it in your downloads folder and it installs to NvDA as an add on. To look and change your add ons, just press NVDA+N and go to the tools sub menu and press right arrow and go to manage add ons and press enter. You can arrow down through your add ons, and tab to get information on that addon. The key commands I gave for the Golden cursor are all there in the help section of the add on web page. You can find add ons in a number of places, but, you can go to this URL:
www.addons.nvda-project.org
Take care,
David Moore

-----Original Message-----
From: Ibrahim Ajayi
Sent: Saturday, November 19, 2016 9:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] mouse movement

Hello:
Thanks for the information.
What is the keystroke for the golden cursor. I'll very much like to
try it out.
Thanks.

On 11/20/16, Richard Kuzma via Groups.Io <rmkuzma=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
There is an add in called golden cursor.

You will need sighted assistance to place the mouse where you want to mark.

Its been a while since I used it, so would have to review how it works.

Also, I took a usb mouse and covered the mouse part on the bottom that
tracks the pointer around and use it just for clicking on things,

This makes it very easy to use and you don't have to worry about moveing
the
pointer around when you don't want it to move.




 

I will preface this with:  I know nothing about the Golden Cursor add-on and what follows is not intended as any sort of comment about its utility.

Don't forget that NVDA has what I think is a major improvement over other screen readers in its mouse tracking function.  Once you develop some slight skill in using the mouse to "scan" the page, even without being able to see exactly where the mouse is, you can get a very good "quick and dirty" knowledge of what is actually on that page, particularly in regard to controls and general content.  I have tried to teach my clients to not "be afraid of the mouse" when used for this purpose and to be willing to actually use it for left and right click (which is easy to do if you keep it in a caddy so it can't move across the surface on which it rests).  I don't often "succeed" (for lack of a better term) as much with an actual mouse as I do with a mouse pad, because it's a simple matter to mask the mouse pad with a piece of heavy cardboard for when you don't want to be activating it accidentally while still having full and easy access to the actual left and right mouse buttons.

I would imagine, based on the description of Golden Cursor, that there could be a powerful wedding between its ability to save a specific location for later "snapping to" and NVDA's mouse tracking to allow you to do a quick "fly over" of a page to find those locations you might want to use with Golden Cursor.

If I'm wrong about this I'm sure someone will set me straight as to how, and I'm more than willing to hear that.  This is conjecture based on very little knowledge of Golden Cursor.
--
Brian

Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.

    ~ Lauren Bacall