Topics

locked NVDA versus JAWS


Aine Kelly Costello
 

Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find any software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still getting info on that).

I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out now whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while I’m still living in New Zealand.

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now that that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine


 

hi.
i dont use microsoft product and not familiar with it.
but the only difference that i know is:
jaws supports virtual ribbon menu, which means that
using jaws, we can navigate between ribbons in the classic way that we
could navigate office 2003,
but nvda does not support virtual ribbon menu.
its the only difference that i know.
but i love nvda very much and pray sincerely every day for its
supporters, developers and maintainers and users who help each other
for using technology.

On 5/22/19, Aine Kelly Costello <ainekc@...> wrote:
Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but
I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as
I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find any
software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still
getting info on that).

I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for
technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out now
whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while I’m
still living in New Zealand.

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that
NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS
Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but
perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now that
that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine


--
By God,
were I given all the seven heavens
with all they contain
in order that
I may disobey God
by depriving an ant
from the husk of a grain of barley,
I would not do it.
imam ali


Quentin Christensen
 

Hi Áine,

I would argue that NVDA can do everything our competitors can do, including OCR (on Windows 10, press NVDA+r then use the regular reading keys), however, I'll leave it to others to argue the pros and cons.

One thing I would suggest, in order to become most efficient with using NVDA, you might consider purchasing our training material.  Basic Training with NVDA is the first module I would recommend.  Despite the name, it actually covers everything from reading the time, up through complex tasks like using the review cursor, object navigation and creating configuration profiles.  We also have modules on using Word, Excel and Outlook with NVDA.  You can purchase these individually, or in our NVDA Productivity Bundle which also includes telephone support.

All of those are available from the NV Access shop: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 11:03 AM Aine Kelly Costello <ainekc@...> wrote:
Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find any software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still getting info on that).

I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out now whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while I’m still living in New Zealand.

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now that that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine




--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Aravind R
 

i want to purchase microsoft office tutorial from nv access but unable
to do since it does not have payment method using indian currency.
kindly help

On 5/22/19, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:
Hi Áine,

I would argue that NVDA can do everything our competitors can do, including
OCR (on Windows 10, press NVDA+r then use the regular reading keys),
however, I'll leave it to others to argue the pros and cons.

One thing I would suggest, in order to become most efficient with using
NVDA, you might consider purchasing our training material. Basic Training
with NVDA is the first module I would recommend. Despite the name, it
actually covers everything from reading the time, up through complex tasks
like using the review cursor, object navigation and creating configuration
profiles. We also have modules on using Word, Excel and Outlook with
NVDA. You can purchase these individually, or in our NVDA Productivity
Bundle which also includes telephone support.

All of those are available from the NV Access shop:
https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 11:03 AM Aine Kelly Costello <ainekc@...>
wrote:

Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but
I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as
I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find
any
software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still
getting info on that).

I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for
technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out
now whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while
I’m still living in New Zealand.

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that
NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS
Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but
perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now
that
that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine


--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available:
http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess




--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

Assistant manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@..., aravind.andhrabank@....
aravind.rajendran@....


Quentin Christensen
 

The NV Access shop lists only in Australian dollars.  If purchasing from overseas, PayPal will automatically convert to your local currency.  You can either use a PayPal account, or enter credit card details without logging in to a PayPal account.

According to Google just now,

$30 AUD (the cost of one of the modules in electronic format) converts to roughly 1,440 Indian Rupee.
$250 AUD (the cost of the NVDA Productivity bundle) converts to roughly 11,946 Indian Rupee.

Kind regards

Quentin.


On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 11:39 AM Aravind R <aravind.andhrabank@...> wrote:
i want to purchase microsoft office tutorial from nv access but unable
to do since it does not have payment method using indian currency.
kindly help

On 5/22/19, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:
> Hi Áine,
>
> I would argue that NVDA can do everything our competitors can do, including
> OCR (on Windows 10, press NVDA+r then use the regular reading keys),
> however, I'll leave it to others to argue the pros and cons.
>
> One thing I would suggest, in order to become most efficient with using
> NVDA, you might consider purchasing our training material.  Basic Training
> with NVDA is the first module I would recommend.  Despite the name, it
> actually covers everything from reading the time, up through complex tasks
> like using the review cursor, object navigation and creating configuration
> profiles.  We also have modules on using Word, Excel and Outlook with
> NVDA.  You can purchase these individually, or in our NVDA Productivity
> Bundle which also includes telephone support.
>
> All of those are available from the NV Access shop:
> https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
>
> Kind regards
>
> Quentin.
>
> On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 11:03 AM Aine Kelly Costello <ainekc@...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but
>> I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!
>>
>> I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as
>> I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find
>> any
>> software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still
>> getting info on that).
>>
>> I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for
>> technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out
>> now whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while
>> I’m still living in New Zealand.
>>
>> My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that
>> NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS
>> Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.
>>
>> I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but
>> perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now
>> that
>> that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?
>>
>> Thanks very much in advance,
>>
>> Best wishes,
>>
>> Áine
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Quentin Christensen
> Training and Support Manager
>
> Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available:
> http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/
>
> www.nvaccess.org
> Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
> Twitter: @NVAccess
>
>
>
>


--
--
nothing is difficult unless you make it appear so.

r. aravind,

Assistant manager
Department of sales
bank of baroda specialised mortgage store, Chennai.
mobile no: +91 9940369593,
email id : aravind_069@..., aravind.andhrabank@....
aravind.rajendran@....





--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Hareth
 

Hi Quentin,
I am a proud NVDA user, and it works as good and sometimes better than
any other screenreaders, specially with some apps, websites ETC, And
adding its an open source free software is the best plus overall.
But with all respect, it doesn't have all jaws features.
OCR in jaws is fully featured, it works on files without opening them
and it reads complete file, even if its a multi page. plus it has the
capability to read the paper documents on the scanner without having
to save the scanned files on the computer.
NVDA's built in OCR is at best is a simple one. and most of the time
recognizes a single line, or nothing on my windows10 machine.
BTW, I have jaws installed on my PC as well, And use the OCR a lot.

On 5/22/19, Quentin Christensen <quentin@...> wrote:
Hi Áine,

I would argue that NVDA can do everything our competitors can do, including
OCR (on Windows 10, press NVDA+r then use the regular reading keys),
however, I'll leave it to others to argue the pros and cons.

One thing I would suggest, in order to become most efficient with using
NVDA, you might consider purchasing our training material. Basic Training
with NVDA is the first module I would recommend. Despite the name, it
actually covers everything from reading the time, up through complex tasks
like using the review cursor, object navigation and creating configuration
profiles. We also have modules on using Word, Excel and Outlook with
NVDA. You can purchase these individually, or in our NVDA Productivity
Bundle which also includes telephone support.

All of those are available from the NV Access shop:
https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 11:03 AM Aine Kelly Costello <ainekc@...>
wrote:

Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but
I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as
I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find
any
software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still
getting info on that).

I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for
technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out
now whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while
I’m still living in New Zealand.

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that
NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS
Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but
perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now
that
that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine


--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available:
http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess
Twitter: @NVAccess




Gene
 

What do yu mean by everything?  If you really mean "everything," That is incorrect.  NVDA is good enough that what it does doesn't need to be exaggerated.  That disappoints people and harms credibility.  I'll leave it to others to site other thingsit doesn't do since I don't use programs like Word, where I don't know if its support is yet as inclusive.  It has improved enormously, from what I've read on the list compared to a few years ago.  So lets consider a few things I know:
You can't label graphics.  You can't define frames and assign actions to them.  You don't have a screen echo that can be set by the user to echo none, some, or all.  Many users know that NVDA can echo information automatically that is placed on the screen in the DOS prompt.  If you set screen echo in JAWS to all, JAWS echos new information automatically in general, which is very useful at times.  And it can be skipped forward and back in with the JAWS repeat and skip lines, performed with the shift keys, while screen echo content is spoken.  That can, at times, make working with a program you haven't defined frames for and where you want to hear material automatically echoed far more efficient under certain circumstances. 
 
And the one more thing I know of and can think of now, NVDA doesn't allow you to set whether description is read before or after the text of something is spoken.  Thus, the user can't choose to have text of a link spoken either before or after visited link is spoken.  You can't determine whether button is spoken before or after the text of the button is read, etc.  I don't think JAWS allows you to individually set these things, but you can determine the general pattern.
 
NVDA does some things better than JAWS.  Since I haven't used JAWS in years, I won't discuss them, because I am not familiar with such instances as they may exist today. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 8:28 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Hi Áine,

I would argue that NVDA can do everything our competitors can do, including OCR (on Windows 10, press NVDA+r then use the regular reading keys), however, I'll leave it to others to argue the pros and cons.

One thing I would suggest, in order to become most efficient with using NVDA, you might consider purchasing our training material.  Basic Training with NVDA is the first module I would recommend.  Despite the name, it actually covers everything from reading the time, up through complex tasks like using the review cursor, object navigation and creating configuration profiles.  We also have modules on using Word, Excel and Outlook with NVDA.  You can purchase these individually, or in our NVDA Productivity Bundle which also includes telephone support.

All of those are available from the NV Access shop: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 11:03 AM Aine Kelly Costello <ainekc@...> wrote:
Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find any software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still getting info on that).

I’m moving overseas, where I probably won’t have access to funding for technology, etc., as an international student. So I’m trying to work out now whether to exclusively use NVDA or try and purchase a JAWS SMA while I’m still living in New Zealand.

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now that that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine




--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

Official NVDA Training modules and expert certification now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


Bianka Brankovic <bianka.brankovic@...>
 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  


erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

Greetings,

On May 21, 2019 9:04:07 PM "Aine Kelly Costello" <ainekc@...> wrote:

Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

This topic gets bogged down in politics anyway and it's a personal favourite of mine.

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find any software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still getting info on that).

I think that's a gross generalization. If I could use mac for everything, I would. Windows is OK for the asics, especially if you have a good means of flashing back to a known good configuration, but I don't like it for the high performance applications I need.


My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

Interesting turn of phrase. I'm biassed but in my experience the reverse is true. I just started a training for a customer using jaws that wanted to learn flipp. I didn't think it would be an issue, since I had just used flipp in chrome with nvda very well. With jaws, it was just really clunky and gross. The customer got so frustrated. I tried chrome and edge with flipp and with other more basic sites and wasn't really pleased with any of it. Speaking of webpage summaries was very random. Some webpages loaded on screen but not in virtual buffer. It was discouraging.

I did have to turn a formula bar setting off in NVDA so that I could use inline editing for cells in excel spreadsheets last term. I forget where the setting is now, but could find it if needed. Other than that, I haven't had any problems in word or excel using nvda. I've done some complex reports with tables of content, heading structures, and bibliographies and have never had trouble getting formatting information and finding the options I need.

On the other hand, I went out to do a training for a college student using jaws for an excel course, and it was brootal. He had some intermitant focus issue where he couldn't navigate cells. Then he would restart the computer and things would work for a bit. Then it would poop out on him. In the spring I went out to do a jaws training and the customer had his authorization fail. List indexes aren't being reported properly. The mail app that comes with windows 10 is doing screwie things, and jaws loses focus in html content such as webpages and emails.

OK, these are small sample sizes, but it seems to me as though jaws screws up all the time nowadays. I figure, if something goes wrong with NVDA:
*Odds are good it'll be fixed in months rather than years.
*I haven't paid anything out of pocket.
*There's a strong support community and excellent documentation.

Honestly, I don't see what you would get out of jaws that you wouldn't get from either nvda or voiceover.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now that that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

OCR is a nonstarter. Everything does it now. Just pull out your phone and get'er done. Realisticly, almost all daily computing such as email, web, simple word processing and document reading can and probably should be done on mobile anyway. I have 4 email accounts on my phone, and only one on each of my development machines, and I'm writing this email from my phone where I'm sitting comfortably on a bus with a work table in front of me.Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine


Angelo Sonnesso
 

I have never had these problems with Jaws, and I have found NVDA equally
reliable.
Each screen has better access in some cases, and so I frequently switch back
and forth.
Narrator is getting there, but is not quite ready for productivity.


73 N2DYN Angelo

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of erik
burggraaf
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 8:32 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io; Aine Kelly Costello
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Greetings,

On May 21, 2019 9:04:07 PM "Aine Kelly Costello" <ainekc@...> wrote:

Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but I've
not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

This topic gets bogged down in politics anyway and it's a personal favourite
of mine.

I'm switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as I'll
be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I'll find any software
we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still getting info on
that).

I think that's a gross generalization. If I could use mac for everything, I
would. Windows is OK for the asics, especially if you have a good means of
flashing back to a known good configuration, but I don't like it for the high
performance applications I need.


My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that NVDA
does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS Word, excel
and web browsing, in particular.

Interesting turn of phrase. I'm biassed but in my experience the reverse is
true. I just started a training for a customer using jaws that wanted to
learn flipp. I didn't think it would be an issue, since I had just used flipp
in chrome with nvda very well. With jaws, it was just really clunky and
gross. The customer got so frustrated. I tried chrome and edge with flipp
and with other more basic sites and wasn't really pleased with any of it.
Speaking of webpage summaries was very random. Some webpages loaded on screen
but not in virtual buffer. It was discouraging.

I did have to turn a formula bar setting off in NVDA so that I could use
inline editing for cells in excel spreadsheets last term. I forget where the
setting is now, but could find it if needed. Other than that, I haven't had
any problems in word or excel using nvda. I've done some complex reports with
tables of content, heading structures, and bibliographies and have never had
trouble getting formatting information and finding the options I need.

On the other hand, I went out to do a training for a college student using
jaws for an excel course, and it was brootal. He had some intermitant focus
issue where he couldn't navigate cells. Then he would restart the computer
and things would work for a bit. Then it would poop out on him.
In the spring I went out to do a jaws training and the customer had his
authorization fail. List indexes aren't being reported properly. The mail
app that comes with windows 10 is doing screwie things, and jaws loses focus
in html content such as webpages and emails.

OK, these are small sample sizes, but it seems to me as though jaws screws up
all the time nowadays. I figure, if something goes wrong with NVDA:
*Odds are good it'll be fixed in months rather than years.
*I haven't paid anything out of pocket.
*There's a strong support community and excellent documentation.

Honestly, I don't see what you would get out of jaws that you wouldn't get
from either nvda or voiceover.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but
perhaps there's enough free software around to do this efficiently now that
that's not a big deal any more . thoughts?

OCR is a nonstarter. Everything does it now. Just pull out your phone and
get'er done. Realisticly, almost all daily computing such as email, web,
simple word processing and document reading can and probably should be done on
mobile anyway. I have 4 email accounts on my phone, and only one on each of
my development machines, and I'm writing this email from my phone where I'm
sitting comfortably on a bus with a work table in front of me.Thanks very much
in advance,

Best wishes,

ine


Arlene
 

Can confirm this.  When I took an online course. I had to use NVDA Jaws did not work well with that online course.  I switch back and forth.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Angelo Sonnesso
Sent: May 22, 2019 5:45 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [NVDA] NVDA versus JAWS

 

I have never had these problems with Jaws, and I have found NVDA equally

reliable.

Each screen has better access in some cases, and so I frequently switch back

and forth.

Narrator is getting there, but is not quite ready for productivity.

 

 

73 N2DYN Angelo

 

-----Original Message-----

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of erik

burggraaf

Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 8:32 AM

To: nvda@nvda.groups.io; Aine Kelly Costello

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Greetings,

 

On May 21, 2019 9:04:07 PM "Aine Kelly Costello" <ainekc@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

 

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but I've

not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

 

This topic gets bogged down in politics anyway and it's a personal favourite

of mine.

 

I'm switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as I'll

be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I'll find any software

we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still getting info on

that).

 

I think that's a gross generalization.  If I could use mac for everything, I

would.  Windows is OK for the asics, especially if you have a good means of

flashing back to a known good configuration, but I don't like it for the high

performance applications I need.

 

 

My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that NVDA

does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS Word, excel

and web browsing, in particular.

 

Interesting turn of phrase.  I'm biassed but in my experience the reverse is

true.  I just started a training for a customer using jaws that wanted to

learn flipp.  I didn't think it would be an issue, since I had just used flipp

in chrome with nvda very well.  With jaws, it was just really clunky and

gross.  The customer got so frustrated.  I tried chrome and edge with flipp

and with other more basic sites and wasn't really pleased with any of it.

Speaking of webpage summaries was very random.  Some webpages loaded on screen

but not in virtual buffer.  It was discouraging.

 

I did have to turn a formula bar setting off in NVDA so that I could use

inline editing for cells in excel spreadsheets last term.  I forget where the

setting is now, but could find it if needed.  Other than that, I haven't had

any problems in word or excel using nvda.  I've done some complex reports with

tables of content, heading structures, and bibliographies and have never had

trouble getting formatting information and finding the options I need.

 

On the other hand, I went out to do a training for a college student using

jaws for an excel course, and it was brootal.  He had some intermitant focus

issue where he couldn't navigate cells.  Then he would restart the computer

and things would work for a bit.  Then it would poop out on him.

In the spring I went out to do a jaws training and the customer had his

authorization fail.  List indexes aren't being reported properly.  The mail

app that comes with windows 10 is doing screwie things, and jaws loses focus

in html content such as webpages and emails.

 

OK, these are small sample sizes, but it seems to me as though jaws screws up

all the time nowadays.  I figure, if something goes wrong with NVDA:

*Odds are good it'll be fixed in months rather than years.

*I haven't paid anything out of pocket.

*There's a strong support community and excellent documentation.

 

Honestly, I don't see what you would get out of jaws that you wouldn't get

from either nvda or voiceover.

 

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but

perhaps there's enough free software around to do this efficiently now that

that's not a big deal any more . thoughts?

 

OCR is a nonstarter.  Everything does it now.  Just pull out your phone and

get'er done.  Realisticly, almost all daily computing such as email, web,

simple word processing and document reading can and probably should be done on

mobile anyway.  I have 4 email accounts on my phone, and only one on each of

my development machines, and I'm writing this email from my phone where I'm

sitting comfortably on a bus with a work table in front of me.Thanks very much

in advance,

 

Best wishes,

 

Áine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Arlene
 

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 


Aine Kelly Costello
 

Thanks everyone for your comments.

To be clear, my intention in posing this question was not to suggest that NVDA is a poor choice of screenreader, or to davalue it in comparison to JAWS. It was simply to get to the heart of the fact that different screenreaders have their pros and cons, and while I’ll definitely download and have NVDA for use regardless of if I buy JAWS, the financial question to sort out is whether to get JAWS, if that makes sense. That’s why I posed the question looking one-sided haha.

Again, I appreciate your input:)

Áine

On 23/05/2019, at 10:41 AM, Arlene <nedster66@...> wrote:

 
Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 
From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS
 
Hello Aine, hello list, 
 
I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences. 
 
Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.
 
As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no. 
 
Hope that helps … 
 
Thanks and kind regards,
 
Bianka 
  

 


Sky Mundell
 

Hello Erick. I have to agree with you. To add to your post, JAWS no longer works with the spellchecker in Office 2019. Meaning, if you push f7, JAWS is just going to say ignore button and nothing else. This started happening in JAWS 18 and it still happens to this day. Needless to say, I'm disappointed with the state of it. When I started using it in 3.5 days, it was perfect! Sure it had its faults, but it at that time was still in the employ of Henter-Joyce, under the direction of a man named Ted Henter who was blind. Now days, JAWS seems to be going downhill. Sad to say, whenever you're at the top, you tend to sit back a little bit. And when you are the second, you tend to work harder. It's honestly sad to watch JAWS go downhill. Fortunately, some if not all agencies are waking up and realising that they're not getting what they are paying for with JAWS updates.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of erik burggraaf
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 5:32 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io; Aine Kelly Costello
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Greetings,

On May 21, 2019 9:04:07 PM "Aine Kelly Costello" <ainekc@...> wrote:

Hi all,

New here and my apologies if this topic has been well-covered before but
I’ve not found an efficient ways to search group archives yet!

This topic gets bogged down in politics anyway and it's a personal
favourite of mine.

I’m switching back to Windows after using a Mac for a couple of years, as
I’ll be studying investigative journalism and am fairly sure I’ll find any
software we need to use etc. to work better on Windows than Mac (still
getting info on that).

I think that's a gross generalization. If I could use mac for everything,
I would. Windows is OK for the asics, especially if you have a good means
of flashing back to a known good configuration, but I don't like it for the
high performance applications I need.


My question is: can you tell me about anything that springs to mind that
NVDA does particularly poorly that JAWS does well? In the domains of MS
Word, excel and web browsing, in particular.

Interesting turn of phrase. I'm biassed but in my experience the reverse
is true. I just started a training for a customer using jaws that wanted
to learn flipp. I didn't think it would be an issue, since I had just used
flipp in chrome with nvda very well. With jaws, it was just really clunky
and gross. The customer got so frustrated. I tried chrome and edge with
flipp and with other more basic sites and wasn't really pleased with any of
it. Speaking of webpage summaries was very random. Some webpages loaded
on screen but not in virtual buffer. It was discouraging.

I did have to turn a formula bar setting off in NVDA so that I could use
inline editing for cells in excel spreadsheets last term. I forget where
the setting is now, but could find it if needed. Other than that, I
haven't had any problems in word or excel using nvda. I've done some
complex reports with tables of content, heading structures, and
bibliographies and have never had trouble getting formatting information
and finding the options I need.

On the other hand, I went out to do a training for a college student using
jaws for an excel course, and it was brootal. He had some intermitant
focus issue where he couldn't navigate cells. Then he would restart the
computer and things would work for a bit. Then it would poop out on him.
In the spring I went out to do a jaws training and the customer had his
authorization fail. List indexes aren't being reported properly. The mail
app that comes with windows 10 is doing screwie things, and jaws loses
focus in html content such as webpages and emails.

OK, these are small sample sizes, but it seems to me as though jaws screws
up all the time nowadays. I figure, if something goes wrong with NVDA:
*Odds are good it'll be fixed in months rather than years.
*I haven't paid anything out of pocket.
*There's a strong support community and excellent documentation.

Honestly, I don't see what you would get out of jaws that you wouldn't get
from either nvda or voiceover.

I imagine JAWS is well-ahead of NVDA in OCRing by now, for instance, but
perhaps there’s enough free software around to do this efficiently now that
that’s not a big deal any more … thoughts?

OCR is a nonstarter. Everything does it now. Just pull out your phone and
get'er done. Realisticly, almost all daily computing such as email, web,
simple word processing and document reading can and probably should be done
on mobile anyway. I have 4 email accounts on my phone, and only one on
each of my development machines, and I'm writing this email from my phone
where I'm sitting comfortably on a bus with a work table in front of
me.Thanks very much in advance,

Best wishes,

Áine


Vlad Dragomir
 

Hello,

 

I’m throwing out  a bit of feedback as well. I use NVDA almost exclusively nowadays. However, I keep preferring the JAWS cursor approach, compared to the concept of screen review found in NVDA. Moreover, JAWS seems to be somewhat better at dealing with programs that haven’t been designed with accessibility in mind. One example to illustrate this: There is a software I use a lot, it’s called Uninstall Tool. It helps uninstall programs by also cleaning up everything they leave behind, which most stand-alone uninstallers do not do unfortunately. In this software, there is a place where we can choose what category of “uninstallable” apps we want to display. That part hasn’t been designed to be reach with the keyboard. With JAWS, I can painlessly find those categories with the JAWScursor,left-click the one I want, and boom, the list opens. On the other hand, when using screen review in NVDA, those categories aren’t even being announced, it’s as if they didn’t exist at all. Therefore, for that program and a few others, I am forced o switch to JAWS.

 

Back to the original question now. Personally, I would advise having both screen readers installed, you can never know what surprises you might have, especially if you try to use different new programs for different purposes. I truly wish NVDA became better at seeing and reporting things that it’s not supposed to, to deal with those situations in which a software creator doesn’t care about accessibility. If I’m not mistaken, JAWS uses a special driver that interacts directly with the graphic card or the video driver, something that NVDA doesn’t do. I might be wrong here, I remember reading about this somewhere long time ago, that’s all.

 

I hope this annoying story is going to help your decision a little bit.

 

Warm regards from Europe,

 

Vlad.


erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 


Nimer Jaber
 

Well, until your theory gets put into practice, we can't tell users that it isn't a good idea to use and have multiple screen readers on their machine. i run into things all the time which work in one but not another. JAWS has a number of features which NVDA lacks. The touch cursor is one powerful example. Text analyzer is another. I use NVDA as my primary screen reader, but at this point, JAWS is more responsive for many tasks than NVDA is, and if Dvorak support was implemented in JAWS, I would likely switch. Not to mention that JAWS provides many more options for indicating web elements and other attributes with sounds, which for me at least makes my computing more efficient. I wish I didn't have to write all of what i am writing, but there you have it.

Ideally, software developers would code things up to spec, screen readers would implement the spec in the same way, and using different screen readers wouldn't matter much, but it does. Until the day comes that this becomes reality, having multiple tools and being acquainted with them is a great idea for most users, and a necessity for anyone wishing to be productive at work in most workplace environments.

thanks.

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 8:18 AM erik burggraaf <erik@...> wrote:

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken accessibility system poorly implemented.  Name one other platform where multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for reliable access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it doesn't comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access into existence.  Since no one can keep up with everything, some things will invariably work differently across the board.  Then add stability issues caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you get a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline.  If a product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the quality of development of that product or service up to meet the standard.  On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.  It's bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:

 

Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.  Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other will work.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Bianka Brankovic
Sent: May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello Aine, hello list,

 

I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.

 

Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know if you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as accessible as you would like it.

 

As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you will be using standard software and you are considering if you really need Jaws to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.

 

Hope that helps …

 

Thanks and kind regards,

 

Bianka

  

 



--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970) (393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


Lenron
 

I have not needed to use jaws as of late but I do think it's a good
idea to have both in the tool box. I would probably use jaws a little
more if I didn't get that damn video driver message all the time, even
after a re-install. Also if I was using a version later than the last
version of 16

On 5/23/19, Nimer Jaber <nimerjaber1@...> wrote:
Well, until your theory gets put into practice, we can't tell users that it
isn't a good idea to use and have multiple screen readers on their machine.
i run into things all the time which work in one but not another. JAWS has
a number of features which NVDA lacks. The touch cursor is one powerful
example. Text analyzer is another. I use NVDA as my primary screen reader,
but at this point, JAWS is more responsive for many tasks than NVDA is, and
if Dvorak support was implemented in JAWS, I would likely switch. Not to
mention that JAWS provides many more options for indicating web elements
and other attributes with sounds, which for me at least makes my computing
more efficient. I wish I didn't have to write all of what i am writing, but
there you have it.

Ideally, software developers would code things up to spec, screen readers
would implement the spec in the same way, and using different screen
readers wouldn't matter much, but it does. Until the day comes that this
becomes reality, having multiple tools and being acquainted with them is a
great idea for most users, and a necessity for anyone wishing to be
productive at work in most workplace environments.

thanks.

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 8:18 AM erik burggraaf <erik@...>
wrote:

I debunk this.

The requirement for multiple screen readers is a simptim of a broken
accessibility system poorly implemented. Name one other platform where
multiple screen readers and switching on the fly are required for
reliable
access?

The problem with windows was is and probably shall ever be that it
doesn't
comply with it's own standards and relies on third parties to hack access
into existence. Since no one can keep up with everything, some things
will
invariably work differently across the board. Then add stability issues
caused by the veritable hackathon, video card instability, third party
scripting issues, and (in the case of one product) outright denial of
service caused by it's own draconian content protection scheme, and you
get
a quagmire.

I don't know about linux so much, but mac, Iphone, and android for sure
are all really slick accessibility products where the expectation is that
things will be stable and accessible out of the box as a baseline. If a
product or feature on those platforms is not accessible, we bring the
quality of development of that product or service up to meet the
standard.
On windows, we bring the accessibility tools down so that they can crunch
through the mess and come up with something that works as long as there's
time, money, demand, and co-operation from the vendor of the product.
It's
bass ackwards, and we've more or less tollerated it because it's what we
are used to.

Best,

Erik

On May 22, 2019 6:42:15 PM "Arlene" <nedster66@...> wrote:



Hi I can confirm this. It’s best to have 2 screan readers on yor system.
Should one not work with whatever it is you are doing. Then the other
will
work.

Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
Windows 10



*From: *Bianka Brankovic <bianka.brankovic@...>
*Sent: *May 22, 2019 4:08 AM
*To: *nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject: *Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS



Hello Aine, hello list,



I am not able to give you an objective view here, just my experiences.



Coming from a Mac/Unix environment myself I would say NVDA does a good
job with standard office applications. Of course, if you want to play it
safe and you have the financial possibilities, update your Jaws to the
newest version before starting your studies. After all, you never know
if
you will encounter a software that doesn’t work with NvDA and works with
Jaws. Personally, I subscribe to the view that it’s always good to have
more than one screen reader installed just in case something is not as
accessible as you would like it.



As to your original question though, if you are pretty sure that you
will
be using standard software and you are considering if you really need
Jaws
to survive in the computer age, my personal answer is no.



Hope that helps …



Thanks and kind regards,



Bianka





--
Best,

Nimer Jaber

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (970)
(393-4481) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!



--
Lenron Brown
Cell: 985-271-2832
Skype: ron.brown762


Glenn / Lenny
 

One thing Jaws has implemented that is helpful is the touch cursor.
This emulates a touch screen with the cursors, whether you have a touch screen installed or not.
Does NVDA have touch screen support?
If so, I may resource this in NVDA.
I too still switch to Jaws when I feel like I need a "jaws cursor".
Glenn
 

Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 2:36 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

Hello,

 

I’m throwing out  a bit of feedback as well. I use NVDA almost exclusively nowadays. However, I keep preferring the JAWS cursor approach, compared to the concept of screen review found in NVDA. Moreover, JAWS seems to be somewhat better at dealing with programs that haven’t been designed with accessibility in mind. One example to illustrate this: There is a software I use a lot, it’s called Uninstall Tool. It helps uninstall programs by also cleaning up everything they leave behind, which most stand-alone uninstallers do not do unfortunately. In this software, there is a place where we can choose what category of “uninstallable” apps we want to display. That part hasn’t been designed to be reach with the keyboard. With JAWS, I can painlessly find those categories with the JAWScursor,left-click the one I want, and boom, the list opens. On the other hand, when using screen review in NVDA, those categories aren’t even being announced, it’s as if they didn’t exist at all. Therefore, for that program and a few others, I am forced o switch to JAWS.

 

Back to the original question now. Personally, I would advise having both screen readers installed, you can never know what surprises you might have, especially if you try to use different new programs for different purposes. I truly wish NVDA became better at seeing and reporting things that it’s not supposed to, to deal with those situations in which a software creator doesn’t care about accessibility. If I’m not mistaken, JAWS uses a special driver that interacts directly with the graphic card or the video driver, something that NVDA doesn’t do. I might be wrong here, I remember reading about this somewhere long time ago, that’s all.

 

I hope this annoying story is going to help your decision a little bit.

 

Warm regards from Europe,

 

Vlad.


 

Hi,

Touch cursor, as far as mechanics is concerned, is object navigation.
Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Glenn / Lenny
Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 8:52 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

One thing Jaws has implemented that is helpful is the touch cursor.

This emulates a touch screen with the cursors, whether you have a touch screen installed or not.

Does NVDA have touch screen support?

If so, I may resource this in NVDA.

I too still switch to Jaws when I feel like I need a "jaws cursor".

Glenn

 

 

Sent: Thursday, May 23, 2019 2:36 AM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA versus JAWS

 

Hello,

 

I’m throwing out  a bit of feedback as well. I use NVDA almost exclusively nowadays. However, I keep preferring the JAWS cursor approach, compared to the concept of screen review found in NVDA. Moreover, JAWS seems to be somewhat better at dealing with programs that haven’t been designed with accessibility in mind. One example to illustrate this: There is a software I use a lot, it’s called Uninstall Tool. It helps uninstall programs by also cleaning up everything they leave behind, which most stand-alone uninstallers do not do unfortunately. In this software, there is a place where we can choose what category of “uninstallable” apps we want to display. That part hasn’t been designed to be reach with the keyboard. With JAWS, I can painlessly find those categories with the JAWScursor,left-click the one I want, and boom, the list opens. On the other hand, when using screen review in NVDA, those categories aren’t even being announced, it’s as if they didn’t exist at all. Therefore, for that program and a few others, I am forced o switch to JAWS.

 

Back to the original question now. Personally, I would advise having both screen readers installed, you can never know what surprises you might have, especially if you try to use different new programs for different purposes. I truly wish NVDA became better at seeing and reporting things that it’s not supposed to, to deal with those situations in which a software creator doesn’t care about accessibility. If I’m not mistaken, JAWS uses a special driver that interacts directly with the graphic card or the video driver, something that NVDA doesn’t do. I might be wrong here, I remember reading about this somewhere long time ago, that’s all.

 

I hope this annoying story is going to help your decision a little bit.

 

Warm regards from Europe,

 

Vlad.