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lengthy reading in Braille


Christopher Kchao
 

Hi,
I was wondering if there might be a better way of doing extensive reading with NVDA and a Braille display that would not cause the whole system to think it's idle. I was recently doing some rather lengthy reading from within the browser, using nothing but the panning keys on my display and not otherwise directly interacting with the system. While I was glad that speech did not make itself heard during this process, I was unexpectedly greeted with the Windows lock screen mid-sentence.
I realize that this situation might be somewhat atypical or low-incidence, but I'm nonetheless hoping there's a work-around out there. The issue as I describe it has the potential to be fairly disruptive to those for whom Braille is their primary means of accessing the screen. Any suggestions would be most appreciated.


David Csercsics
 

 

Yes, I’ve hit this as well. Just make sure the power plan is high performance, or that nothing can cause the computer to sleep. If the screen saver or sleep activates, then this would occur. The bigger problem is that you cannot get braille on UAC or log on screens reliably, and that braille support is fairly crippled without the braille extender add-on for most braille displays as compared to other screen readers. However I’m a primary braille user, though I never use braille input because the translator lag makes touch typing quicker, even though I have to pick up the keyboard to do it. Having to install add-ons for braille seems very silly indeed, as I’d think for those that have displays since a lot of us prefer braille to speech anyway, that seems like a basic feature. I’d say for serious braille reading though, braille Extender is a required install. The key commands are a bit odd compared to other screen readers, but they work well. Incidentally the same problem happens with braille on iOS. If you stop moving your display or something for a few seconds it’ll disconnect. I’m not sure what the best way should be to handle this by default though.


Vincent Le Goff <vincent.legoff.srs@...>
 

Just throwing an idea here, but shouldn't NVDA be able to reach Windows to tell it "no, keep running, we're still doing stuff" when pressing the Braille panning keys?  I guess most of us don't notice, because this is triggered by input devices (keyboards or mouses) but a Braille display just doesn't count.  However, I would think NVDA could do that fairly easily.  Just a guess here,

something worth implementing IMO.


Vincent

On 10/25/2019 9:48 PM, David Csercsics wrote:

 

Yes, I’ve hit this as well. Just make sure the power plan is high performance, or that nothing can cause the computer to sleep. If the screen saver or sleep activates, then this would occur. The bigger problem is that you cannot get braille on UAC or log on screens reliably, and that braille support is fairly crippled without the braille extender add-on for most braille displays as compared to other screen readers. However I’m a primary braille user, though I never use braille input because the translator lag makes touch typing quicker, even though I have to pick up the keyboard to do it. Having to install add-ons for braille seems very silly indeed, as I’d think for those that have displays since a lot of us prefer braille to speech anyway, that seems like a basic feature. I’d say for serious braille reading though, braille Extender is a required install. The key commands are a bit odd compared to other screen readers, but they work well. Incidentally the same problem happens with braille on iOS. If you stop moving your display or something for a few seconds it’ll disconnect. I’m not sure what the best way should be to handle this by default though.


David Csercsics
 

I don’t think NVDA can do that because I don’t think Windows knows about the braille display. The only reason Windows doesn’t go to sleep for speech is because it’s running through the sound card. But I think the problem is that Windows does not know about braille devices.


Brian Tew
 

My displays do not disconnect after long pauses in ios.
I wonder whats going on there.


David Csercsics
 

Interesting. What display do you have? I find that with the latest iOS 13 if the screen locks automatically it disconnects the display and I have to unlock the phone and wait for the display to reconnect. I have a Brailliant BI 40, but maybe you disabled autolock, which would explain that.


Andre Fisher
 

Hi.

This seems to be fixed in NVDA 2019.3. You can test the snapshots now, or wait for the official release.


Brian Tew
 

Oops I got that wrong. You mean when the screen locks.
yes we have to unlock the screen and connect again when the screen locks.


John J. Boyer
 

I have never had problems with reading Braille for long periods. I usually read files with notepad or WordPad. I did have the help of a knowledgeable tech who
turned off everything that might make the computer sleep.

John

On Fri, Oct 25, 2019 at 05:58:29PM -0400, David Csercsics wrote:
I don’t think NVDA can do that because I don’t think Windows knows about the braille display. The only reason Windows doesn’t go to sleep for speech is because it’s running through the sound card. But I think the problem is that Windows does not know about braille devices.


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Status: Company dissolved but website and email addresses live.
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Vincent Le Goff <vincent.legoff.srs@...>
 

It's true that you still have the option to disable sleep mode in Windows settings.  I must admit I did it.  I don't want this laptop to turn off unless I turn it off manually.  So I don't have this issue either, when reading in braille, and I do read a lot. But again I guess something else could be done to keep sleep mode available and still allow long Braille reading.


Vincent

On 10/26/2019 8:51 AM, John J. Boyer wrote:
I have never had problems with reading Braille for long periods. I usually read files with notepad or WordPad. I did have the help of a knowledgeable tech who
turned off everything that might make the computer sleep.

John

On Fri, Oct 25, 2019 at 05:58:29PM -0400, David Csercsics wrote:
I don’t think NVDA can do that because I don’t think Windows knows about the braille display. The only reason Windows doesn’t go to sleep for speech is because it’s running through the sound card. But I think the problem is that Windows does not know about braille devices.



 

Well I have disabled all power modes.

I always have output of all minimums at maximum, sometimes I drop the minimal processer  to half, but mostly I don't.

Everything is set not to save power so nothing gets interupted.

The disks don't turn off, the system does not sleep, or hybernate.

Unless I turn it off it will not turn off.

The only exception is that if I close the lid or forget to shut the system off it will hybernate by default.

This may be good for short transports etc.

My aunt didn't have anything set because I always turn it off, and she shut it, and put it away in her bag and it  got hot.

It didn't damage it though, still its a good idea not to do that.

On 27/10/2019 12:57 am, Vincent Le Goff wrote:
It's true that you still have the option to disable sleep mode in Windows settings.  I must admit I did it.  I don't want this laptop to turn off unless I turn it off manually.  So I don't have this issue either, when reading in braille, and I do read a lot. But again I guess something else could be done to keep sleep mode available and still allow long Braille reading.


Vincent

On 10/26/2019 8:51 AM, John J. Boyer wrote:
I have never had problems with reading Braille for long periods. I usually read files with notepad or WordPad. I did have the help of a knowledgeable tech who
turned off everything that might make the computer sleep.

John

On Fri, Oct 25, 2019 at 05:58:29PM -0400, David Csercsics wrote:
I don’t think NVDA can do that because I don’t think Windows knows about the braille display. The only reason Windows doesn’t go to sleep for speech is because it’s running through the sound card. But I think the problem is that Windows does not know about braille devices.