Backing up a Thunderbird profile, very strange problem


Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64 bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive, so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK, that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird. I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird, if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use, but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this has got me really baffled.

Chris.


Roger Stewart
 

I really don't know what that copy files without their properties thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive. Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger

On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64 bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive, so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK, that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird. I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird, if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use, but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this has got me really baffled.

Chris.



Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

Roger,


The really bizarre thing is, I didn't see that checkbox. In fact, I couldn't even tab away from the yes button. Even using the NVDA review commands didn't really help. I suppose I could a tried to navigate that dialog with Narrator, but, ewwww! Must I?


Chris.

On 12/10/2016 3:25 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I really don't know what that copy files without their properties thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive. Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger













On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64 bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive, so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK, that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird. I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird, if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use, but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this has got me really baffled.

Chris.





 

Chris,

          Just tried this on my machine from the hard drive to an SD card (which is a USB device as far as the machine is concerned) and it went without a hitch.

          I presume you've already done a complete shutdown and restart (or straight Restart under Win10, which reloads the OS).  If you have not, I suggest you try it and see if that alleviates the problem.  I have often found when I get the occasional inexplicable error like this the power cycling works wonders.
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

Yes, I have tried this suggestion countless of times to no avale, and just to clarify, I definitely do indeed understand that you're speaking of doing a full shutdown, not just a simple restart.


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 3:55 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Chris,

          Just tried this on my machine from the hard drive to an SD card (which is a USB device as far as the machine is concerned) and it went without a hitch.

          I presume you've already done a complete shutdown and restart (or straight Restart under Win10, which reloads the OS).  If you have not, I suggest you try it and see if that alleviates the problem.  I have often found when I get the occasional inexplicable error like this the power cycling works wonders.
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    




Shaun Oliver
 

no. to navigate those dialogs when you come in to that issue, you need to use left and right arrow keys.


This has been so since windows8.1

On 11/12/2016 07:21, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
Roger,


The really bizarre thing is, I didn't see that checkbox. In fact, I couldn't even tab away from the yes button. Even using the NVDA review commands didn't really help. I suppose I could a tried to navigate that dialog with Narrator, but, ewwww! Must I?


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 3:25 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I really don't know what that copy files without their properties thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive. Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger













On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64 bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive, so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK, that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird. I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird, if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use, but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this has got me really baffled.

Chris.







 

Chris,

          The shutdown/restart distinction has been so *^%&# muddied by Microsoft that it makes me want to scream.  Prior to Windows 8 (I think it started in 8) doing a shutdown meant that the computer shut down and nothing, at all, was kept in terms of the operating system state.

          Now, since the "Fast Boot"/"Fast Start" option of shutdown is on by default, it is much more similar to hibernate than shutdown.  Hibernation writes out the operating system state and the state of all user accounts that are logged in and powers off the machine.   A shutdown with fast boot enabled only writes out the operating system state, but reloads that when the machine is powered up again.

          By contrast, the Restart command forces the operating system to reload from scratch.

          As far as I'm concerned, that's backward, and most people don't know it.  I'm posting this for that reason, as I believe you do.

          If, however, the fast boot/start feature is turned off, shutdown does a complete shutdown and Windows loads from scratch the next time the machine is powered up.
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

Oh, ok. that would explain it. Thanks for the heads up. Let me give that a try, then.


Just to confirm as well, I am! indeed, copying the correct folder, am I not?


Chris.

On 12/10/2016 4:42 PM, Shaun Oliver wrote:
no. to navigate those dialogs when you come in to that issue, you need to use left and right arrow keys.


This has been so since windows8.1



On 11/12/2016 07:21, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
Roger,


The really bizarre thing is, I didn't see that checkbox. In fact, I couldn't even tab away from the yes button. Even using the NVDA review commands didn't really help. I suppose I could a tried to navigate that dialog with Narrator, but, ewwww! Must I?


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 3:25 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I really don't know what that copy files without their properties thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive. Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger













On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64 bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive, so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK, that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird. I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird, if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use, but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this has got me really baffled.

Chris.









Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

OK, how does one see if fast boot is turned on or not, then turn it off, if needed?

Chris.

On 12/10/2016 4:43 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Chris,

          The shutdown/restart distinction has been so *^%&# muddied by Microsoft that it makes me want to scream.  Prior to Windows 8 (I think it started in 8) doing a shutdown meant that the computer shut down and nothing, at all, was kept in terms of the operating system state.

          Now, since the "Fast Boot"/"Fast Start" option of shutdown is on by default, it is much more similar to hibernate than shutdown.  Hibernation writes out the operating system state and the state of all user accounts that are logged in and powers off the machine.   A shutdown with fast boot enabled only writes out the operating system state, but reloads that when the machine is powered up again.

          By contrast, the Restart command forces the operating system to reload from scratch.

          As far as I'm concerned, that's backward, and most people don't know it.  I'm posting this for that reason, as I believe you do.

          If, however, the fast boot/start feature is turned off, shutdown does a complete shutdown and Windows loads from scratch the next time the machine is powered up.
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    




 

To Turn Off Fast Startup in Windows 8 or Windows 10

1.       Open Control Panel,

2.       Open Power Options,

3.      Activate "Choose what the power button does" link,

4.      Activate "Change settings that are currently unavailable" link,

5.      Uncheck checkbox for "Turn on Fast Startup (Recommended)"

6.      Hit the Save Changes button.

--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

Would there really be a reason to turn this off, normally?


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 5:34 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

To Turn Off Fast Startup in Windows 8 or Windows 10

1.       Open Control Panel,

2.       Open Power Options,

3.      Activate "Choose what the power button does" link,

4.      Activate "Change settings that are currently unavailable" link,

5.      Uncheck checkbox for "Turn on Fast Startup (Recommended)"

6.      Hit the Save Changes button.

--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    




 

Chris,

          The answer as to whether there is "really a reason" to turn Fast Start off will be answered differently by different technicians.

          I have experienced no end of problems, and specifically with assistive technology, when something, and heaven knows what, becomes corrupted in the hiberfile that is written out for use by Fast Start on the next boot cycle.  I've seen things as bizarre as keyboards not responding, but if you knew to do a Restart you could get around it.  You could do a shutdown/restart as many times as you liked with Fast Start on and the problem was persistent, so I have no doubt it had to be something about the system state that was being saved in the hiberfile.

          I turn it off for precisely this reason on every machine I configure.  Most people believe that when they are shutting down their machine using the shutdown button (or alternate process, like the shutdown command from command prompt) that they are doing precisely that, but with Fast Boot on they're really not.

          I keep my machine on for days at a time after I boot up, so I don't care if my boot time is "long."  I want to know that when I shut down I am not bringing a single, solitary thing from my prior OS run state back into play when I power my machine up again.

          There are others who will feel precisely the opposite, and so long as they know that they can force the OS to be reloaded from scratch using Restart then that's OK, too.  Different strokes for different folks.
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



 

Well if you used a desktop you probably would turn it off, I always do.
The only reason you would keep this on is if you were a business user on the go that needed to be active almost immediately.

On 11/12/2016 11:55 a.m., Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
Would there really be a reason to turn this off, normally?


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 5:34 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

*/To Turn Off Fast Startup in Windows 8 or Windows 10/*

1.Open Control Panel,

2.Open Power Options,

3.Activate "Choose what the power button does" link,

4.Activate "Change settings that are currently unavailable" link,

5.Uncheck checkbox for "Turn on Fast Startup (Recommended)"

6.Hit the Save Changes button.

--
*/Brian/*

*/Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from
/**/insufficient premises./*

*/~ Samuel Butler, /1835-1902*



Gene
 

And I believe that using the restart command performs a full shutdown before the restart.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2016 3:43 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Backing up a Thunderbird profile, very strange problem

Chris,

          The shutdown/restart distinction has been so *^%&# muddied by Microsoft that it makes me want to scream.  Prior to Windows 8 (I think it started in 8) doing a shutdown meant that the computer shut down and nothing, at all, was kept in terms of the operating system state.

          Now, since the "Fast Boot"/"Fast Start" option of shutdown is on by default, it is much more similar to hibernate than shutdown.  Hibernation writes out the operating system state and the state of all user accounts that are logged in and powers off the machine.   A shutdown with fast boot enabled only writes out the operating system state, but reloads that when the machine is powered up again.

          By contrast, the Restart command forces the operating system to reload from scratch.

          As far as I'm concerned, that's backward, and most people don't know it.  I'm posting this for that reason, as I believe you do.

          If, however, the fast boot/start feature is turned off, shutdown does a complete shutdown and Windows loads from scratch the next time the machine is powered up.
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



 

On Sat, Dec 10, 2016 at 03:37 pm, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Well if you used a desktop you probably would turn it off, I always do.
The only reason you would keep this on is if you were a business user on the go that needed to be active almost immediately.

Er, no.  My desktop stays powered up, too.   As a general rule I keep my machines powered up until or unless some misbehavior requires a power cycling.  I have also, anecdotally, noticed the claims about hard drives lasting longer when they don't have to spin down and spin up again any more frequently than necessary.  Of course, these days, they do that all on their own with energy management controls, so I don't know how much difference it makes.  I've been around computers too darned long!! 
--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



 

On Sat, Dec 10, 2016 at 03:55 pm, Gene wrote:
And I believe that using the restart command performs a full shutdown before the restart.

Yes, it does, at least under Windows 8 and Windows 10.

Does anyone happen to know whether this was true in all earlier versions of Windows?  It seems to me that it did not, at least at for a while, but I could be entirely wrong.

--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



Gene
 

Restart has always restarted Windows from a full shutdown.  I've seen times when I've made some settings changes or perhaps done something else, I don't remember now, it was a long time ago, when the process told me to restart and gave me an option to do so in a dialog.  At times, using that option wouldn't completely shut down the computer as far as I could tell from what I heard.  But using the restart command always has.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, December 10, 2016 6:04 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Backing up a Thunderbird profile, very strange problem

On Sat, Dec 10, 2016 at 03:55 pm, Gene wrote:
And I believe that using the restart command performs a full shutdown before the restart.

Yes, it does, at least under Windows 8 and Windows 10.

Does anyone happen to know whether this was true in all earlier versions of Windows?  It seems to me that it did not, at least at for a while, but I could be entirely wrong.

--
Brian

 Life is the art of drawing sufficient conclusions from insufficient premises.

         ~ Samuel Butler, 1835-1902

    



Shaun Oliver
 

yes, I believe so. I've never had to back up thunderbird before today, I just do a fresh install and reenter the data

On 11/12/2016 08:36, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
Oh, ok. that would explain it. Thanks for the heads up. Let me give that a try, then.


Just to confirm as well, I am! indeed, copying the correct folder, am I not?


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 4:42 PM, Shaun Oliver wrote:
no. to navigate those dialogs when you come in to that issue, you need to use left and right arrow keys.


This has been so since windows8.1



On 11/12/2016 07:21, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
Roger,


The really bizarre thing is, I didn't see that checkbox. In fact, I couldn't even tab away from the yes button. Even using the NVDA review commands didn't really help. I suppose I could a tried to navigate that dialog with Narrator, but, ewwww! Must I?


Chris.



On 12/10/2016 3:25 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I really don't know what that copy files without their properties thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive. Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger













On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64 bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive, so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK, that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird. I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird, if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use, but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this has got me really baffled.

Chris.











Jacques <lists4js@...>
 

Hi Guys

The described prompts about stream loss is related to the flash drive formatted as FAT32 rather than NTFS. There will undoubtedly be many arguments for and against formatting a flash drive as NTFS, but I won't go into them here. In some cases, when building a bootable flash drive, it is necessary to format as FAT32. However, if the flash drive is used only for storing files for backup purposes on a Windows based system, re-formatting the flash drive as NTFS will solved the problem Chris described.

A last note, if you are also using the flash drive for porting files between a Windows based machine and a MAC, NTFS is not an option, since MAC cannot read NTFS partitions.

Hope this clears up the confusion.


Jacques

On 2016/12/10 10:25 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I really don't know what that copy files without their properties
thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB
drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive.
Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take
too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the
same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these
notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this
for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to
go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy
everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger













On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64
bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind
script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find
them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my
Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile
folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive,
so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no
problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying
the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK,
that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes
the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then
paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things
start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy
the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the
whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop
asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever
progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an
administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a
fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this
same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of
it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound
up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old
school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's
a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason
this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird.
I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard
installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird,
if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or
service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use,
but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would
indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running
Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple
different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both
as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left
to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this
has got me really baffled.

Chris.






Christopher-Mark Gilland <clgilland07@...>
 

It clears up the confusion, yes, but what is one to do if I wanted to back up my profile folder on a USB drive which I use both on my mac, and on Windows?


Chris.

On 12/10/2016 9:04 PM, Jacques wrote:
Hi Guys

The described prompts about stream loss is related to the flash drive formatted as FAT32 rather than NTFS. There will undoubtedly be many arguments for and against formatting a flash drive as NTFS, but I won't go into them here. In some cases, when building a bootable flash drive, it is necessary to format as FAT32. However, if the flash drive is used only for storing files for backup purposes on a Windows based system, re-formatting the flash drive as NTFS will solved the problem Chris described.

A last note, if you are also using the flash drive for porting files between a Windows based machine and a MAC, NTFS is not an option, since MAC cannot read NTFS partitions.

Hope this clears up the confusion.


Jacques

On 2016/12/10 10:25 PM, Roger Stewart wrote:
I really don't know what that copy files without their properties
thinghy means but I get it here all the time but only if I copy to a USB
drive of any kind like a flash stick or an external USB drive.
Apparently there are some invisible file properties that just must take
too much bandwidth to pass through the USB interface as I can copy the
same files from one internal disk drive to another without getting these
notices. Anyhow, there's usually a checkbox that asks you to do this
for all subsequent files and if you just check this and then tell it to
go ahead and copy without the properties, it should then just copy
everything without you needing to do anything more.

Hope this helps.

Roger













On 12/10/2016 1:20 PM, Christopher-Mark Gilland wrote:
This is just totally strange! So... I'm running Windows 10 Home, 64
bit, Thunderbird 45.2.0, and JAWS 18 without the Thunderbird Blind
script from John
Martin. I have them, but don't have them installed, as I don't find
them all that helpful.

Anyway, I have only one profile which contains one e-mail account: my
Gmail, which is of corse set up as IMap, not as Pop3.

Basically, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to copy my profile
folder from appdata\roming\thunderbird\profiles over to a flash drive,
so that I have
a backup, in case I ever need it. I get the folder copied with no
problem. Note, I'm not copying the actual profiles folder. I'm copying
the actual profile
folder within the profiles folder with the weird number string. OK,
that works fine, and I get it to my clipboard, no worries. Then, comes
the problem.
I navigate over to my D drive which is my USB flash drive. I then
paste with ctrl+V right there in the root of the USB drive. Things
start copying until
about 89% when I get an interupted action. It asks if I want to copy
the current file as is, without its properties. If I say no, then the
whole paste
process aborts. If I say yes, then it goes into an infinent loop
asking me if I want to do the same thing over and over, and never ever
progresses beyond
that 89%. Yes, I do have admin rights, and yes, I'm logged on as an
administrator, and further, UAC is disabled completely. I know for a
fact that this
isn't an issue of me having a corrupted installation, as I had this
same exact problem with another laptop I used to own, come to think of
it, and I never
could figure out how to get around it. It seems like I finally wound
up using the command line, and copying over the profile with the old
school XCopy
utility, but I don't remember its syntax. Even if I did though, that's
a really! annoying way to have to do this! There's gotta be a reason
this is happening.
I should add that this is not a portable installation of Thunderbird.
I have it actually fully installed to my C drive as a standard
installation.

I wondered if maybe even though I'd hit alt+F4 and closed Thunderbird,
if maybe it was still running in the background as a process or
service, and therefore
wasn't letting certain files copy over, as they were locked in use,
but that's not the case, as I see nothing in task manager that would
indicate such.
Further, I've rebooted, and have tried this before ever even running
Thunderbird, and I still get the problem. I've tried with multiple
different flash
drives, and I've also reformatted the drives. I've formatted them both
as FAT32, as well as NTFS, but in both cases, the issue is persisting.

Honestly folks, I'm out of options. I don't know what on earth is left
to try.

Any ideas? Normally, I'm really good with this kind a thing, but this
has got me really baffled.

Chris.