Filling out MS Word Document


 

Hello everyone,

I am filling out an MS Word form using NVDA.
The blanks to fill out are underlined Which NVDA speaks it as "line
line line ..." an as I type the information, those lines move forward.
Is there a way to keep the underlined blank line stationary while I type?
Or would it be best to delete the underlines, type the information and
then underline if I so wish?
I would appreciate your response.
Nevzat Adil


 

Nevzat,

            You are the recipient of an MS-Word document that is a form that is meant to be printed and filled out by hand, which seems to be how most of them get made.  Why true MS-Word forms, with form fields, have never come into common use I will never know.

            What I tend to do is to select the underlines as a group, then use the underline feature related to the font in use to type in its replacement.

            I hate even doing this as it can cause things to shift that shouldn't shift, but typing in front of the underscores that have been put in the document as the line to write on will guarantee that things will shift and the final result will be, shall we say, unexpected.

            Those who are creating MS-Word forms had ought to know how to actually create MS-Word forms with form fields that you simply tab through and type.  But that ship has long ago sailed and you'll get lots of "forms" that are meant to be printed as paper forms for filling out by hand.
--
Brian

    I don't find an uninformed hatred a "principled position" that I need to respect in any way.

        ~ Ellen Evans, soc.motss, 11/6/2004



Louis Maher <ljmaher@...>
 

Another approach is to switch from insert mode to overtype mode.  I believe the command for this (at least in JAWS) is:

Toggle Writing Mode use ALT+CTRL+I. Toggles between insert and overtype modes.

 

Regards

Louis Maher

Phone: 713-444-7838

E-mail: ljmaher@...

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 5:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Filling out MS Word Document

 

Nevzat,

            You are the recipient of an MS-Word document that is a form that is meant to be printed and filled out by hand, which seems to be how most of them get made.  Why true MS-Word forms, with form fields, have never come into common use I will never know.

            What I tend to do is to select the underlines as a group, then use the underline feature related to the font in use to type in its replacement.

            I hate even doing this as it can cause things to shift that shouldn't shift, but typing in front of the underscores that have been put in the document as the line to write on will guarantee that things will shift and the final result will be, shall we say, unexpected.

            Those who are creating MS-Word forms had ought to know how to actually create MS-Word forms with form fields that you simply tab through and type.  But that ship has long ago sailed and you'll get lots of "forms" that are meant to be printed as paper forms for filling out by hand.
--
Brian

    I don't find an uninformed hatred a "principled position" that I need to respect in any way.

        ~ Ellen Evans, soc.motss, 11/6/2004

 


Quentin Christensen
 

I don't think Word forms will ever increase in popularity now that it's very hard to find the controls to create them - you need to enable the developer ribbon first now to get the buttons on the ribbon.  I guess a lot of forms are moving to web page forms now?

Anyway, the other thing I wanted to chime in on was that overtype mode is disabled by default in recent versions of Word.  You need to enable it by going into file menu (alt+f), selecting options (t) then control+tab five times to get to "Advanced", then either press alt+o to get to "use the insert key to control overtype mode".

The other option is to add it to the status bar, then you can press F6, then arrow to it and then press enter, but if you are going to do that, you might as well just enable using INSERT - note if you have INSERT set as your NVDA key, you'll need to press it twice to toggle overtype mode.

Regards

Quentin.

On Wed, Feb 8, 2017 at 2:09 PM, Louis Maher <ljmaher@...> wrote:

Another approach is to switch from insert mode to overtype mode.  I believe the command for this (at least in JAWS) is:

Toggle Writing Mode use ALT+CTRL+I. Toggles between insert and overtype modes.

 

Regards

Louis Maher

Phone: 713-444-7838

E-mail: ljmaher@...

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, February 7, 2017 5:34 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Filling out MS Word Document

 

Nevzat,

            You are the recipient of an MS-Word document that is a form that is meant to be printed and filled out by hand, which seems to be how most of them get made.  Why true MS-Word forms, with form fields, have never come into common use I will never know.

            What I tend to do is to select the underlines as a group, then use the underline feature related to the font in use to type in its replacement.

            I hate even doing this as it can cause things to shift that shouldn't shift, but typing in front of the underscores that have been put in the document as the line to write on will guarantee that things will shift and the final result will be, shall we say, unexpected.

            Those who are creating MS-Word forms had ought to know how to actually create MS-Word forms with form fields that you simply tab through and type.  But that ship has long ago sailed and you'll get lots of "forms" that are meant to be printed as paper forms for filling out by hand.
--
Brian

    I don't find an uninformed hatred a "principled position" that I need to respect in any way.

        ~ Ellen Evans, soc.motss, 11/6/2004

 




--
Quentin Christensen
Training Material Developer
Basic Training for NVDA & Microsoft Word with NVDA E-Books now available: http://www.nvaccess.org/shop/

www.nvaccess.org 
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess 
Twitter: @NVAccess 


 

Quentin,

         Thanks for confirming that what I found in my own Word 2010 configuration with regard to overtype mode being disabled is now the default for later versions of Word.  I used to hate, hate, hate how easy it was to accidentally activate it, though I can see precisely why it would be incredibly handy under the circumstances described earlier.  I'm going to have to check out if JAWS does something clever to have the toggle key sequence mentioned by Mr. Maher work when it's running, as it does not when it is not.

I still use Word forms with blind clients when I know that they will be responsible for churning out the same thing over and over again.  They're very handy for things like check templates (once you get the positioning correct), envelope templates, and forms around an office like taking phone messages.  It also makes life much  easier if you happen to get distracted in the middle of filling one out (at least if they're put together correctly) because you can hit the F1 key to have information about the form field that you're currently in spoken and know where you're picking up.
--
Brian

    I don't find an uninformed hatred a "principled position" that I need to respect in any way.

        ~ Ellen Evans, soc.motss, 11/6/2004



 

Control+alt+i works with Jaws to toggle.
Thank you all for your responses.
Nevzat Adil

On 2/8/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Quentin,

         Thanks for confirming that what I found in my own Word 2010
configuration with regard to overtype mode being disabled is now the default
for later versions of Word.  I used to hate, hate, hate how easy it was to
accidentally activate it, though I can see precisely why it would be
incredibly handy under the circumstances described earlier.  I'm going to
have to check out if JAWS does something clever to have the toggle key
sequence mentioned by Mr. Maher work when it's running, as it does not when
it is not.

I still use Word forms with blind clients when I know that they will be
responsible for churning out the same thing over and over again.  They're
very handy for things like check templates (once you get the positioning
correct), envelope templates, and forms around an office like taking phone
messages.  It also makes life much  easier if you happen to get distracted
in the middle of filling one out (at least if they're put together
correctly) because you can hit the F1 key to have information about the form
field that you're currently in spoken and know where you're picking up.
--
*Brian*

   I don't find an uninformed hatred a "principled position" that I need to
respect in any way.

        ~ *Ellen Evans * , soc.motss , 11/6/2004