Topics

Is NVDA right for me?


Fantasy Sports <fantasylife@...>
 

Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?


Roger Stewart
 

I would give it a try. When you install it, you have the option of having nvda always start when the computer starts or not. If you uncheck this, nvda won't run unless you send the command of ctrl, alt, and N keys. That will start it and it will speak. When you're done, just hit the NVDA key (numpad insert plus Q and it will ask if you want to quit nvda. just hit enter and it will be gone until you want to use it again.


Roger

On 3/13/2017 1:34 AM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?












Gene
 

Regarding your first message, any screen-reader can be set to only run when you run it and you can unload it when finished.  But if your intention is to only read text, often just a small amount, then have it not run, then run it again when you want to read more text and make such changes frequently, any screen-reader may take an annoying amount of time to run when you run it.  You'll have to see how long NVDA takes when you run it repeatedly.  The first time you run it may take longer than subsequent times so you can't judge by the first time.  If you are using the installed version, you can use these two commands without any further work.  NVDA key, which is either insert in the default desktop layout, and q while holding the NVDA key, brings up the unload NVDA dialog.  Press enter once it comes up.  To run NVDA, use the command control alt j.  You can put NVDA to sleep in the program you are using and quickly resume operation when desired but as far as I know, that feature doesn't turn off the screen-reader except in that one program.  I'll discuss sleep more if you want to continue trying NVDA.  But the first question is whether any screen-reader is the best choice.  There may be programs that read selected text and those may serve you better.  There may be list members who know of such programs. 
 
As far as voices are concerned, there are a lot of voices available, some free voices, some you pay for.  You can use demos of paid voices and you can try free voices, of course, as unlimited free programs. 
 
You can read more about available voices here:
 
Regarding your second message, please send it again.  As moderator, I know why it didn't reach the list and you won't have that problem any longer.  It isn't a problem with your message, it has to do with how the list handles first messages and all your messages should now reach the list almost immediately.
 
Briefly, the first message sent by a new member must be approved.  If a second message is sent before the first message is approved, I just found out that it, too, must be approved.  I didn't know it and the second message was lost.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 1:34 AM
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue. 

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me.  Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users.  I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?












Chris Mullins
 

Hi
NVDA can easily be configured to run on demand. It sounds like you have sufficient sight not to require speech guidance through the log-in process, although NVDA can do this if required. It can just sit as a Desktop Icon and uses associated hotkey sequences to switch it on/ off as required. NVDA comes with a speech synthesizercalled Espeak which is very responsive and has numerous voices to choose from. NVDA can also use high quality 3rd party speech synthesizers which you can purchase and there are a host of free synthetic voices, including those used by Narrator, which also work very well. -----

Cheers
Chris
Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Fantasy Sports
Sent: 13 March 2017 06:35
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA, JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows, and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even want to use this type of software all the time when I use the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited way, is NVDA right for me?


Gene
 

It should be pointed out that the default fvoice that comes with NVDA is one many users don't want to use.  You can set NVDA to use all or almost all of the Microsoft voices already on your machine or you can try other voices, as I described in my previous message. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:41 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

I would give it a try. When you install it, you have the option of
having nvda always start when the computer starts or not. If you uncheck
this, nvda won't run unless you send the command of ctrl, alt, and N
keys.  That will start it and it will speak. When you're done, just hit
the NVDA key (numpad insert plus Q and it will  ask if you want to quit
nvda. just hit enter and it will be gone until you want to use it again.


Roger










On 3/13/2017 1:34 AM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
> Hello group,
>
> I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
> of text easily without getting fatigue.
>
> I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
> JAWS, or possibly other programs.
>
> Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
> sure it is the right program for me.  Let me explain.
>
> There are several people using this family computer, and I
> don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
> and run in the background and bother them.
>
> We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
> to log on and off as different users.  I myself don't even
> want to use this type of software all the time when I use
> the computer.
>
> I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
> whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
> at any given time.
>
> Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
> extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
> just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.
>
> I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
> want something too robotic sounding.
>
> So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
> way, is NVDA right for me?
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




Don H
 

As a long time user of Window Eyes I have found that NVDA with the Access32 voice is very comparable to Window Eyes. With the uncertainty of Window Eyes being a long term product, I would highly recommend NVDA.

On 3/13/2017 10:47 AM, Gene wrote:
It should be pointed out that the default fvoice that comes with NVDA is
one many users don't want to use. You can set NVDA to use all or almost
all of the Microsoft voices already on your machine or you can try other
voices, as I described in my previous message.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Roger Stewart <mailto:paganus2@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Monday, March 13, 2017 10:41 AM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

I would give it a try. When you install it, you have the option of
having nvda always start when the computer starts or not. If you uncheck
this, nvda won't run unless you send the command of ctrl, alt, and N
keys. That will start it and it will speak. When you're done, just hit
the NVDA key (numpad insert plus Q and it will ask if you want to quit
nvda. just hit enter and it will be gone until you want to use it again.


Roger










On 3/13/2017 1:34 AM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?















Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Well difficult to say really. I suppose some kind of configuring could shut it up a bit more when not needed, but to be honest, if you want human sounding voices although there are some good ones it will take a time to get things as you like them no matter what you need.
If money is no object there are other solutions that are not as verbose. Look at Dolphins supernova ranges, or some of the magnifiers you can get that have some added speech. The whole idea of a full screenreader is to speak choices, options and documents etc, and the amount of configurability you want is going to only be known to yourself.
the voice it comes with is pretty unbearable, but ther are variants in the program which are better.

Lots of synths out there to try out as well.
Its reallyy an unnswerable question.
dolphin and others do do demo downloads of their software so I'd suggest trying anything that takes your fancy.

Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Fantasy Sports" <fantasylife@earthlink.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 6:34 AM
Subject: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?


Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?











Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Depending on what you want read, and how much trouble it is for you, you could use my clipboard reading program at:

http://www.softcon.com/files/clipspeak.exe

You simply run it, and it will read anything that has been copied to the clipboard, then it exits. No fuss, no mess.

It's not designed to do anything else, so if you're not up to copying text to the clipboard all the time, then it won't work for your purposes, but if that's all you need, it works quite well.

hth.

On 3/13/2017 2:34 AM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?











Fantasy Sports <fantasylife@...>
 

I've not heard of Windows Eyes, but I have Windows
Narrator.

The problem with Narrator is it just never stops
talking, and you can't control what it reads.

For instance, I copied and pasted your email into
Narrator, and and first it doesn't read it, but
later it just reads it over and over without
stopping :)

If anyone can explain Narrator to me, that might
suffice for my needs, if I could ever get it to
work efficiently.

If not, I will probably give NVDA a try a pay
for the voice.

Thank you everyone who has responded to my messages.

-----Original Message-----
From: Don H <lmddh50@comcast.net>
Sent: Mar 13, 2017 11:04 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

As a long time user of Window Eyes I have found that NVDA with the
Access32 voice is very comparable to Window Eyes. With the uncertainty
of Window Eyes being a long term product, I would highly recommend NVDA.

On 3/13/2017 10:47 AM, Gene wrote:
It should be pointed out that the default fvoice that comes with NVDA is
one many users don't want to use. You can set NVDA to use all or almost
all of the Microsoft voices already on your machine or you can try other
voices, as I described in my previous message.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
*From:* Roger Stewart <mailto:paganus2@gmail.com>
*Sent:* Monday, March 13, 2017 10:41 AM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

I would give it a try. When you install it, you have the option of
having nvda always start when the computer starts or not. If you uncheck
this, nvda won't run unless you send the command of ctrl, alt, and N
keys. That will start it and it will speak. When you're done, just hit
the NVDA key (numpad insert plus Q and it will ask if you want to quit
nvda. just hit enter and it will be gone until you want to use it again.


Roger










On 3/13/2017 1:34 AM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?
















Fantasy Sports <fantasylife@...>
 

thanks for that, sounds interesting. That
is sort of how I'm using Narrator at the
moment, although its a bit random what
it chooses to read.

-----Original Message-----
From: Travis Siegel <tsiegel@softcon.com>
Sent: Mar 13, 2017 1:48 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Depending on what you want read, and how much trouble it is for you, you
could use my clipboard reading program at:

http://www.softcon.com/files/clipspeak.exe

You simply run it, and it will read anything that has been copied to the
clipboard, then it exits. No fuss, no mess.

It's not designed to do anything else, so if you're not up to copying
text to the clipboard all the time, then it won't work for your
purposes, but if that's all you need, it works quite well.

hth.



On 3/13/2017 2:34 AM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
Hello group,

I have a cognitive impairment and can't read large amounts
of text easily without getting fatigue.

I am trying to decide between using Windows Narrator, NVDA,
JAWS, or possibly other programs.

Although NVDA is free and is supposed to be good, I'm not
sure it is the right program for me. Let me explain.

There are several people using this family computer, and I
don't want an intrusive program that will take over Windows,
and run in the background and bother them.

We all use the same log in, and I don't want people to have
to log on and off as different users. I myself don't even
want to use this type of software all the time when I use
the computer.

I personally just want a program that I can turn on and off
whenever I want to read out loud a specific piece of text
at any given time.

Windows Narrator is pretty easy to turn on and off, but its
extremely difficult to control what it reads out loud, it
just starts spewing without end whatever is on the screen.

I also don't know how the voice sounds in NVDA, but I don't
want something too robotic sounding.

So based on that I just want to use this program in a limited
way, is NVDA right for me?















Pranav Lal
 

Hi,

I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.

Pranav


Fantasy Sports <fantasylife@...>
 

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@gmail.com>
Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Hi,

I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.

Pranav




john s
 

If you have Microsoft Office 2010 or later, you can get Window Eyes for free.

At 02:27 PM 3/14/2017, you wrote:
Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@gmail.com>
Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Hi,

I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask
may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.

Pranav



John


Gene
 

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>



Fantasy Sports <fantasylife@...>
 

Yes, I agree with you.  Thank you everyone in this group for all your kind advice, it has helped me a lot.

I will definitely look into these other options before coming back to screen readers as an option.

I should probably unsubscribe to this group until that time, my mailbox can't handle too many messages...
 
Do you know how I would unsubscribe?

Peace.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Mar 14, 2017 2:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi,

The address for unsubscribing is

nvda+unsubscribe@groups.io.

Hope this helps.

Rosemarie



On 3/15/2017 1:35 PM, Fantasy Sports wrote:
Yes, I agree with you.  Thank you everyone in this group for all your kind advice, it has helped me a lot.

I will definitely look into these other options before coming back to screen readers as an option.

I should probably unsubscribe to this group until that time, my mailbox can't handle too many messages...
 
Do you know how I would unsubscribe?

Peace.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Mar 14, 2017 2:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>




Георги Ламбов <obichamlegiona@...>
 

   Hi!

In my opinion you mustn't unSubscribe this group. There are people with good computer's knowledge and experience here, who will help you further. And about the messages you can make filters for the messages of NvdA-mailinglist and this filter will be only for the messages from this group. If you are also member of any other group, you can do the same about the messages of the group you are. In this way you will have more place for the letters you receive.
Cheers!
Georgi
На 15.3.2017 г. в 22:35 ч., Fantasy Sports написа:

Yes, I agree with you.  Thank you everyone in this group for all your kind advice, it has helped me a lot.

I will definitely look into these other options before coming back to screen readers as an option.

I should probably unsubscribe to this group until that time, my mailbox can't handle too many messages...
 
Do you know how I would unsubscribe?

Peace.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Mar 14, 2017 2:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>




Fantasy Sports <fantasylife@...>
 

Well if there are people here with good computer knowledge and
experience, then the main question I would want to ask next
is how to get Windows Narrator to work properly.

Is there anyone here who can help me get Windows Narrator
to work efficiently, so that it reads outloud exactly what I want it to
each time?

Right Now, it appears that Windows Narrator is like a wild horse
that just runs around and does what it wants to, haha.

If anyone here can help with Narrator, I'd be very grateful.

-----Original Message-----
From: Георги Ламбов
Sent: Mar 15, 2017 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

   Hi!

In my opinion you mustn't unSubscribe this group. There are people with good computer's knowledge and experience here, who will help you further. And about the messages you can make filters for the messages of NvdA-mailinglist and this filter will be only for the messages from this group. If you are also member of any other group, you can do the same about the messages of the group you are. In this way you will have more place for the letters you receive.
Cheers!
Georgi
На 15.3.2017 г. в 22:35 ч., Fantasy Sports написа:
Yes, I agree with you.  Thank you everyone in this group for all your kind advice, it has helped me a lot.

I will definitely look into these other options before coming back to screen readers as an option.

I should probably unsubscribe to this group until that time, my mailbox can't handle too many messages...
 
Do you know how I would unsubscribe?

Peace.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Mar 14, 2017 2:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>




Gene
 

Are you selecting text with a mouse?  If Narrator doesn't read it when you do so, I doubt there is such a setting.  Have you looked through the settings and is there anything related to what is read such as read selected or highlighted?  I don't recall what version of Windows you are using and such a feature may have been added in Windows 8 or 10 but I doubt it. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2017 1:59 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Well if there are people here with good computer knowledge and
experience, then the main question I would want to ask next
is how to get Windows Narrator to work properly.

Is there anyone here who can help me get Windows Narrator
to work efficiently, so that it reads outloud exactly what I want it to
each time?

Right Now, it appears that Windows Narrator is like a wild horse
that just runs around and does what it wants to, haha.

If anyone here can help with Narrator, I'd be very grateful.

-----Original Message-----
From: Георги Ламбов
Sent: Mar 15, 2017 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

   Hi!

In my opinion you mustn't unSubscribe this group. There are people with good computer's knowledge and experience here, who will help you further. And about the messages you can make filters for the messages of NvdA-mailinglist and this filter will be only for the messages from this group. If you are also member of any other group, you can do the same about the messages of the group you are. In this way you will have more place for the letters you receive.
Cheers!
Georgi
На 15.3.2017 г. в 22:35 ч., Fantasy Sports написа:
Yes, I agree with you.  Thank you everyone in this group for all your kind advice, it has helped me a lot.

I will definitely look into these other options before coming back to screen readers as an option.

I should probably unsubscribe to this group until that time, my mailbox can't handle too many messages...
 
Do you know how I would unsubscribe?

Peace.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Mar 14, 2017 2:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>




Gene
 

See this article:
 
Narrator can be made to read selected text to an extent but it may not do what you want. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2017 2:39 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Are you selecting text with a mouse?  If Narrator doesn't read it when you do so, I doubt there is such a setting.  Have you looked through the settings and is there anything related to what is read such as read selected or highlighted?  I don't recall what version of Windows you are using and such a feature may have been added in Windows 8 or 10 but I doubt it. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2017 1:59 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Well if there are people here with good computer knowledge and
experience, then the main question I would want to ask next
is how to get Windows Narrator to work properly.

Is there anyone here who can help me get Windows Narrator
to work efficiently, so that it reads outloud exactly what I want it to
each time?

Right Now, it appears that Windows Narrator is like a wild horse
that just runs around and does what it wants to, haha.

If anyone here can help with Narrator, I'd be very grateful.

-----Original Message-----
From: Георги Ламбов
Sent: Mar 15, 2017 4:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

   Hi!

In my opinion you mustn't unSubscribe this group. There are people with good computer's knowledge and experience here, who will help you further. And about the messages you can make filters for the messages of NvdA-mailinglist and this filter will be only for the messages from this group. If you are also member of any other group, you can do the same about the messages of the group you are. In this way you will have more place for the letters you receive.
Cheers!
Georgi
На 15.3.2017 г. в 22:35 ч., Fantasy Sports написа:
Yes, I agree with you.  Thank you everyone in this group for all your kind advice, it has helped me a lot.

I will definitely look into these other options before coming back to screen readers as an option.

I should probably unsubscribe to this group until that time, my mailbox can't handle too many messages...
 
Do you know how I would unsubscribe?

Peace.

-----Original Message-----
From: Gene
Sent: Mar 14, 2017 2:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Window-eyes isn't simpler than NVDA.  I don't know just what Narrator can do.  for your purposes, I don't know if it's any better or not.  Narrator may be simpler but that doesn't mean it will meet your needs.  I'm not saying that NVDA or Narrator will meet your needs or not.  I'm saying that I don't think you are looking at options in the right order.  I would think that there are e-mail lists and/or Internet forums where people who have dyslexia and other print disabilities can discuss programs they use to read print and they may be able to discuss how best to read whatever you want to read.  
 
I'm not saying that you won't decide to look into screen-readers after you try to get information about other means.  I'm saying that I think you are looking at options in the wrong order.  Screen-readers are intended for blind users and don't necessarily do things that you want done or in the way you want them done. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 1:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?

Cannot read much text without getting ill, but don't need to
navigate the computer.

I think the answers have pretty much covered it, right now
leaning towards something that might be simpler then NVDA.

Might need to learn how to really fine tune Windows Narrator
or learn more about Windows Eyes.

Thanks for the help!

-----Original Message-----
>From: Pranav Lal <pranav.lal@...>
>Sent: Mar 13, 2017 7:21 PM
>To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>Subject: Re: [nvda] Is NVDA right for me?
>
>Hi,
>
>I have not seen all messages on this thread therefore what I ask may have already been covered. In what situation do you need to read text? If you are fatigued when reading long documents then a solution like text aloud may work better. If however, you need to navigate the computer by using speech, then NVDA is the way to go.
>
>Pranav
>
>
>
>