Email Client


Andrea Sherry
 

Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea


 

Well thunderbird is fine, turn off lightning which you don't need and you can just use it.

Actually old eudora7 is better but as you have to validate ssl certs every few days its no good unless you run it without ssl I guess.

On 11/04/2017 9:44 p.m., Andrea Sherry wrote:
Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea


Gene
 

It doesn't matter if it's a basic program or not.  What matters is how you teach.  Just ignore most functions and teach a small number of keyboard commands to do things.  Enter opens messages.  Escape closes messages.  Control replies to messages.  I won't list the other two or three commands necessary but Windows Live Mail will serve or Thunderbird, though I prefer Windows Live Mail.  It has a very useful command Thunderbird doesn't, control I, to return to the inbox whatever folder you are working in.  Windows live Mail is set to read messages as plain text by default and I recommend leaving that setting as it is.  Have the viewpane opened.  You can't read mail by opening a message if you read mail as plain text.  Have the people move down the message list and, when they get to a message they want to read, simply tab to get into the viewpane and read it.  Then, have them tab twice, once to move to the folders treeview and then once again to move back to the message list.  Delete the message, if desired and you will automaticaly be on the next message.  Tab once to get to the view pane if you want to read the message, etc. 
If you do have a message you want to read as HTML for some reason, press enter to open the message, then issue the command alt shift h.  The currently opened message will be read in
Regardless of which program you use, you won't get more simple than that.  There is no reason to teach all sorts of features and use a POP account. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 4:44 AM
Subject: [nvda] Email Client

Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea


Ron Canazzi
 

Thunderbird works quite well with NVDA.



On 4/11/2017 5:44 AM, Andrea Sherry wrote:

Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea


-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Gerardo Corripio
 

Oh yes Thunderbird works great with NVDA! I'm using and have been using Thunderbird as my EMail client for the past almost 4 years!


El 11/04/2017 a las 09:15 a.m., Ron Canazzi escribió:

Thunderbird works quite well with NVDA.



On 4/11/2017 5:44 AM, Andrea Sherry wrote:

Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea


-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


 

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill



Gene
 

A user can issue a command in all sorts of programs that may get them into trouble.  The answer is not to look for programs that are so simple that this is unlikely, regardless of what keys are mistakenly pressed.  the answer is to be available to the user or to tell the user how to get help such as on an e-mail list. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 10:14 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill



 

Gene,

       We'll just have to agree to disagree.  I (or anyone) cannot be constantly available nor, if they're stuck in their e-mail program, can they get help on an e-mail list.

       One tailors what one offers to a given client based on their perceived skill set, history with working with similar clients, and what one knows about the likelihood of that client being able to figure things out for themselves or effectively reach out for help.

        Very often that means picking programs based on the simplest user interface and the least number of features that gets the job done.  I've been there, done that, and got the T-shirt many times and for many years now.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill



Gene
 

We can agree to disagree but I strongly disagree for reasons I'll explain.
 
I wouldn't want to deprive people of using a program such as Winamp.  I would tell them not to do certain things such as not to use any commands except what I taught if the user is that limited in knowledge.  In an e-mail program, what can you do?  You can open the address book, get into the menus or ribbons, start to forward something or end up in the wrong folder.  The likelihood of changing settings in any permanent way is very low.  Telling the user to do something like press escape or close and reopen the program or in the case of Windows Live mail, to use control I if they get lost and are in the wrong folder would cover problems in general.  There are no perfect solutions.  But limiting users in this way means that they won't use many programs that are actually better to use for one reason or another. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:08 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

Gene,

       We'll just have to agree to disagree.  I (or anyone) cannot be constantly available nor, if they're stuck in their e-mail program, can they get help on an e-mail list.

       One tailors what one offers to a given client based on their perceived skill set, history with working with similar clients, and what one knows about the likelihood of that client being able to figure things out for themselves or effectively reach out for help.

        Very often that means picking programs based on the simplest user interface and the least number of features that gets the job done.  I've been there, done that, and got the T-shirt many times and for many years now.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill



 

Gene,

         You are talking in abstractions, and in the abstract I agree with you 100%.

         I am talking about repeated actualities, and I know that handing a user far more than they can handle, and when they are a "panic button presser," is a recipe for ongoing disasters.

         There are no perfect solutions.  I will stand by what my years of direct tutoring experience have taught me about trying to fit the tool to the person using it.  In the specific situation under discussion here, I'd aim for the simplest e-mail client I could find.  If the client were one of my grad students who needs access to calendar, filtering capability, and myriad other features and needs to know how to use them I'd go an entirely different way.  There is no one-size fits all and judgment about what's needed and what can be handled is a part of the role of a teacher, technical or otherwise.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

I'm using thunderbird right now and it does work great with NVDA.




On 4/11/2017 7:26 AM, Gerardo Corripio wrote:

Oh yes Thunderbird works great with NVDA! I'm using and have been using Thunderbird as my EMail client for the past almost 4 years!


El 11/04/2017 a las 09:15 a.m., Ron Canazzi escribió:

Thunderbird works quite well with NVDA.



On 4/11/2017 5:44 AM, Andrea Sherry wrote:

Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea


-- 
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

-- 
Gera
Enviado desde Thunderbird


john s
 

pandora mail is a bit like Eudora and handles certificates and odd character sets better than Eudora. I haven't tried it with nvda but it worked well with Window Eyes. It costs $14.

At 05:53 AM 4/11/2017, you wrote:
Well thunderbird is fine, turn off lightning which you don't need and you can just use it.

Actually old eudora7 is better but as you have to validate ssl certs every few days its no good unless you run it without ssl I guess.




On 11/04/2017 9:44 p.m., Andrea Sherry wrote:
Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea

John


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Andrea,


Thunderbird works well with

NVDA.

Rosemarie


On 4/11/2017 2:44 AM, Andrea Sherry wrote:

Can anyone suggest a very basic email program for use with NVDA.

We are working with some NVDA users who are elderly or who have little computer skill.

Any suggestions much appreciated.

Cheers

Andrea



Peter Chin
 

I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well. However, I have not found a way to  enable the spellcheck facility. Suggestions would be appreciated.
 

Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill

 


Gene
 

If you mean to run the spellchecker, the short cut command is f7.  That is a very common command to run the spell checker in programs that have them.
 
Gene

------- Original Message -----
From: Peter Chin
Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well. However, I have not found a way to  enable the spellcheck facility. Suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill

 


Ron Canazzi
 

Hi Peter,


Keep in mind that if you do not have a Microsoft Office product installed then the spell checker will not work in Windows Live Mail.  You can get a number of free spell checkers that will work with Windows Live Mail.  I haven't needed one for a while, but someone on the list will probably recommend one or you can Google Spell Checker for Windows Live Mail and find one.



On 4/13/2017 12:03 AM, Gene wrote:
If you mean to run the spellchecker, the short cut command is f7.  That is a very common command to run the spell checker in programs that have them.
 
Gene
------- Original Message -----
From: Peter Chin
Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well. However, I have not found a way to  enable the spellcheck facility. Suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill

 


--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

If you do not have any microsoft office product installed you have no spell hecker. Its another reason why I'm still using Outlook express.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter Chin" <peter.chinpk@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 8:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client


I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well. However, I have not found a way to enable the spellcheck facility. Suggestions would be appreciated.

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers. One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed. That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit. That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail. It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client. If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here. I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint. The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical. If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

~ Dorothy Nevill


Gene
 

That isn't correct.  Outlook Express has no spell checker and uses the Word spell checker.  Most e-mail programs do have spell checkers including Thunderbird and Windows Live Mail.  And in Outlook Express, beyond a certain version of Word, you can't use the Word spell checker in Outlook Express.  The last version where might have been Word 2003 or Word 2007 but the Word spell checker hasn't worked or worked properly with Outlook Express for years.
 
There are third party spell checkers you can use with Outlook Express.  I don't know how good they are.
 
Gene
----- Original Meessage ------

Sent: Thursday, April 13, 2017 12:22 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

If you do not have any microsoft office product installed you have no spell
hecker. Its another reason why I'm still using Outlook express.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter Chin" <peter.chinpk@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 8:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client


I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well.
However, I have not found a way to  enable the spellcheck facility.
Suggestions would be appreciated.

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works
beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and
ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less
sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by
fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know
about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the
trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially
supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their
proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows
Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.
If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft
Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in
7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of
weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client,
that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an
accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than
Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client
for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the
right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill








Peter Chin
 

Hello Gene,
 
Thanks for your suggestion. My last message was written in haste and I neglected to point out that I had already tried F7 without effect. When I go to the spellcheck via the ribbon, it tells me that it is disabled and I can find no way of enabling it.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, April 13, 2017 12:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 
If you mean to run the spellchecker, the short cut command is f7.  That is a very common command to run the spell checker in programs that have them.
 
Gene
------- Original Message -----
From: Peter Chin
Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 
I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well. However, I have not found a way to  enable the spellcheck facility. Suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill

 


Gene
 

I don't know why.  All I can suggest is uninstalling and reinstalling the program.  That might help but I don't know how likely that is.. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Chin
Sent: Thursday, April 13, 2017 9:23 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client

Hello Gene,
 
Thanks for your suggestion. My last message was written in haste and I neglected to point out that I had already tried F7 without effect. When I go to the spellcheck via the ribbon, it tells me that it is disabled and I can find no way of enabling it.
 
From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, April 13, 2017 12:03 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 
If you mean to run the spellchecker, the short cut command is f7.  That is a very common command to run the spell checker in programs that have them.
 
Gene
------- Original Message -----
From: Peter Chin
Sent: Wednesday, April 12, 2017 2:43 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 
I am using mainly Windows Live Mail and for the most part it works well. However, I have not found a way to  enable the spellcheck facility. Suggestions would be appreciated.
 
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2017 11:14 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Email Client
 

I'm with everyone so far, but in different senses.

Thunderbird is indeed an excellent e-mail client overall and works beautifully with NVDA and other screen readers.  One can teach basic use and ignore all the bells and whistles not needed.  That being said, the less sophisticated user can and often does get themselves into trouble by fat-fingering something and triggering some function that they do not know about, do not wish to trigger, and have no idea how to exit.  That is the trouble with using a really full-featured e-mail client like Thunderbird.

I like Windows Live Mail 2012, and even though it's no longer officially supported that is mostly because Microsoft decided to change their proprietary access methods and did not wish to continue updating Windows Live Mail.   It still serves perfectly well as a POP or IMAP e-mail client.  If you want to download a copy of the full offline installer for Microsoft Essentials, of which Windows Live Mail is a part, it's on my Google Drive in 7-Zip format here.  I snagged a copy of the offline installer a couple of weeks before Microsoft withdrew active support.

I have recently learned of another fairly simple email client, eM Client, that looks quite good but I have not had a chance yet to evaluate it from an accessibility standpoint.  The interface seems to be simpler than Thunderbird's is, and that can be critical.   If you do evaluate this client for accessibility please report back.
--
Brian

     The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

            ~ Dorothy Nevill