Accessible music notation software


brandon
 

Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon


John Sanfilippo
 

Hi,

You might try these:

1, www.lilypond.org: This is open source software which runs on many
platforms. It is text based, so you learn a text coding which is
interpreted by lilypond, and output as PDF and MIDI files. You print the
pdf and optionally listen to the midi file.

2, www.Musescore.org is an open source scoring program like Sibelius or
Finale. Scores are written on screen using keyboard and mouse. They are
aware of accessibility, but they say that the program is right now more
suitable for reading scores than writing them for visually impaired.

Now, if you have some funds there are two other scoring programs:

3, Sibelius which has Jaws and some NVDA support.
More info is here:
http://www.raisedbar.co.uk/Sibelius/SibeliusAccessV5.htm

4, www.dancingdots.com develops a program called Goodfeel. For this you
must run Jaws. I know of no NVDA support, though that may be
forthcoming. This is a suite of programs which includes SharpEye, a
music OCR program for scanning printed music, Lime, a print music
scoring program made accessible by Jaws scripts called LimeAloud, and
Goodfeel, a braille music transcribing software which converts Lime
scores into braille music.

Hope this helps some.

John S

On 5/27/17 15:45, brandon wrote:
Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon

--
- JS o -


 

Brandon,

           I forwarded your message to a dear friend of mine who's an organist and who's been blind since birth.  Here is her response:
--------------------
He needs to learn braille music, and somewhere out there is something, don't know what to call it, that shows what the print notation looks like, but personally I'd have to ask questions before I could answer his. If you think I'd be helpful, permission granted to give him my email.
--------------------
           If you wish to take her up on her offer please send me a private message and I'll arrange a cyber introduction.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.332

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Brian,

 

If Brandon needs to learn braille music, Hadley School for the Blind has courses in braille music. That might be a first step for him.

 

Rosemarie

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, May 27, 2017 5:52 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Accessible music notation software

 

Brandon,

           I forwarded your message to a dear friend of mine who's an organist and who's been blind since birth.  Here is her response:
--------------------
He needs to learn braille music, and somewhere out there is something, don't know what to call it, that shows what the print notation looks like, but personally I'd have to ask questions before I could answer his. If you think I'd be helpful, permission granted to give him my email.
--------------------
           If you wish to take her up on her offer please send me a private message and I'll arrange a cyber introduction.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.332

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


 

Rosemarie,

             That's very useful information to have, particularly for those who might just be beginning to wade into music.

              I would hope that someone who is considering a music major in college who also happens to be blind would already be entirely proficient with Braille music notation.  Majoring in music, whether performance or education, presumes a thorough knowledge of more than just the basics from the outset.  I made the presumption that someone considering a music major would be proficient in Braille music notation if they are blind.  In Brandon's case I also presumed that the need is for some sort of "instant translator" program that allows his sighted fellow-musicians to see the music he's working with or they're all trying to work with in the conventional musical notation and to be able to do this "on the fly".
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063.332

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Jorge Gonçalves <joport3@...>
 

Hello:


You also have Braille Music Editor 2

http://www.veia.it/en/bme2_product


For this software there is a Add-on for Nvda which makes it perfectly usable with our screen reader.

Cheers,

Jorge



Às 00:26 de 28/05/2017, John Sanfilippo escreveu:

Hi,

You might try these:

1, www.lilypond.org: This is open source software which runs on many
platforms. It is text based, so you learn a text coding which is
interpreted by lilypond, and output as PDF and MIDI files. You print the
pdf and optionally listen to the midi file.

2, www.Musescore.org is an open source scoring program like Sibelius or
Finale. Scores are written on screen using keyboard and mouse. They are
aware of accessibility, but they say that the program is right now more
suitable for reading scores than writing them for visually impaired.

Now, if you have some funds there are two other scoring programs:

3, Sibelius which has Jaws and some NVDA support.
More info is here:
http://www.raisedbar.co.uk/Sibelius/SibeliusAccessV5.htm

4, www.dancingdots.com develops a program called Goodfeel. For this you
must run Jaws. I know of no NVDA support, though that may be
forthcoming. This is a suite of programs which includes SharpEye, a
music OCR program for scanning printed music, Lime, a print music
scoring program made accessible by Jaws scripts called LimeAloud, and
Goodfeel, a braille music transcribing software which converts Lime
scores into braille music.

Hope this helps some.

John S



On 5/27/17 15:45, brandon wrote:
Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon


Jorge Gonçalves <joport3@...>
 

I forgot to say. With Braille music Editor 2, you can have print scores if you export your braille music as Muxicxml File. This allows a sighted person to open this file with a mainstream Notation software and print it. I have done it without any problems.


Às 20:45 de 27/05/2017, brandon escreveu:

Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon


brandon
 

thank you all for your kind suggestions.

On 5/28/17, Jorge Gonçalves <joport3@gmail.com> wrote:
I forgot to say. With Braille music Editor 2, you can have print scores
if you export your braille music as Muxicxml File. This allows a sighted
person to open this file with a mainstream Notation software and print
it. I have done it without any problems.


Às 20:45 de 27/05/2017, brandon escreveu:
Greetings list,

I am planning on starting my journey on becomming a music major in the
fall of this year.
I was wondering if there are any accessible programs that can help me in
music notation.
Especially ones that can display music notation in the standard print
way.
Also if there are any tips and tricks of the trade that can help those
would be appreciated.
Kind regards,
Brandon