Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Bhavya shah
 

Dear all,
I use a Windows 8.1 machine, and usually evade all dodgy websites,
particularly ones involving social engineering. Thus, I am in need of
a simple, powerful and accessible anti-virus tool to compliment the
built-in Windows Defender (which I deem insufficient).
To thoroughly limit the scope of this question, because I am aware
that accessible anti-virus pertaining discussions have taken place
endlessly in the past, which of the following four would a general
consensus in the NVDA community recommend - Avast, Avira, AVG or
Sophos? Please note that my personal focus would lie only with the
free versions of the aforesaid programs.
I would truly appreciate any assistance.
Thanks.

--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah

Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

Contacting Me
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com
Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125
Mobile Number: +91 7506221750


 

Bhavya,

           I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior in interacting with cyberspace?

           I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in this context.   From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this year.   It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party antivirus or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death of your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a virus to each other.  That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs simultaneously.  Every third party product I know of, including those you've named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed and reenable it if they are uninstalled.

          I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons and the fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden) or Avast.  Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution about these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET or Emsisoft Anti-Malware
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message. 

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting any infection is quite low.   I have been using Windows Defender now for a couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before that, and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just fine.  But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a decade now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get one later.  It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of these programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's  comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe Computing.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Gene
 

A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order.  You can run more than one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more than one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other straight antivirus program or combination program.  If you want to know what program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be addressed. 
 
If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend to be run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed. 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?

Bhavya,

           I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior in interacting with cyberspace?

           I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in this context.   From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this year.   It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party antivirus or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death of your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a virus to each other.  That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs simultaneously.  Every third party product I know of, including those you've named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed and reenable it if they are uninstalled.

          I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons and the fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden) or Avast.  Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution about these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET or Emsisoft Anti-Malware
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message. 

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting any infection is quite low.   I have been using Windows Defender now for a couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before that, and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just fine.  But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a decade now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get one later.  It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of these programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's  comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe Computing.
--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Bhavya shah
 

Hi Brian and Gene,
Alright, thanks for the clarifications about any third-party anti
virus program I choose to utilize not being complimentary but
substitutive.a replacement. Whilst my Internet records are quite
clean, I require to interact with multiple USB flashdrives which again
are a great agent of spreading viruses, which I may or may not always
be able to quickly scan before copying a file over quickly and
ejecting. Additionally, while I may not be completely cogent or
objective in my desire to install an alternative anti-virus software,
I have had recent problems with my computer, and those started around
the time Windows Defender started giving alerts of detecting threats
and removing them. All in all, I reckon a supposedly more 'advanced?'
option may prove productive as a long term measures, thus the
question. Since AVG and Avast are such, and Avira, I believe, was
acquired by Avast in the recent past, would Sophos be an obvious
recommendation indirectly? The other programs Brian mentioned aren't
accessibility-vouched, plus I am somewhat hesitant to be adventurous
at the present instant (due to upcoming school examinations).
Apologies for any lack of proactivity from my end in terms of
thoroughly exploring and analysing all available options.
Thanks.

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order. You can run more than
one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more than
one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination
antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other
straight antivirus program or combination program. If you want to know what
program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or
combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be
addressed.

If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend to be
run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed.
Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Bhavya,

I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider
Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior in
interacting with cyberspace?

I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in this
context. From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination
antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more
sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this
year. It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party antivirus
or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death of
your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a virus
to each other. That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs
simultaneously. Every third party product I know of, including those you've
named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed and
reenable it if they are uninstalled.

I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons and the
fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden) or
Avast. Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution about
these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on
BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
a.. AVG privacy policy update allows it to sell your browsing history
b.. Avast and AVG Antivirus products collect personal data for selling to
advertisers
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance
advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other
products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET
or Emsisoft Anti-Malware.
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft
Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message.

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting any
infection is quite low. I have been using Windows Defender now for a
couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before that,
and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just
fine. But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no
antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a decade
now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by
your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get one
later. It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of these
programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe
Computing.
--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot level on
request - it changes too often to keep in signature)
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the
opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

~ Niels Bohr





--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah

Blogger at Hiking Across Horizons: https://bhavyashah125.wordpress.com/

Contacting Me
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com
Follow me on Twitter @BhavyaShah125 or www.twitter.com/BhavyaShah125
Mobile Number: +91 7506221750


enes sarıbaş
 

hi,

correction: avg was acquired by avast, not avira.

On 7/13/2017 7:26 AM, Bhavya shah wrote:
Hi Brian and Gene,
Alright, thanks for the clarifications about any third-party anti
virus program I choose to utilize not being complimentary but
substitutive.a replacement. Whilst my Internet records are quite
clean, I require to interact with multiple USB flashdrives which again
are a great agent of spreading viruses, which I may or may not always
be able to quickly scan before copying a file over quickly and
ejecting. Additionally, while I may not be completely cogent or
objective in my desire to install an alternative anti-virus software,
I have had recent problems with my computer, and those started around
the time Windows Defender started giving alerts of detecting threats
and removing them. All in all, I reckon a supposedly more 'advanced?'
option may prove productive as a long term measures, thus the
question. Since AVG and Avast are such, and Avira, I believe, was
acquired by Avast in the recent past, would Sophos be an obvious
recommendation indirectly? The other programs Brian mentioned aren't
accessibility-vouched, plus I am somewhat hesitant to be adventurous
at the present instant (due to upcoming school examinations).
Apologies for any lack of proactivity from my end in terms of
thoroughly exploring and analysing all available options.
Thanks.

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order. You can run more than
one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more than
one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination
antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other
straight antivirus program or combination program. If you want to know what
program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or
combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be
addressed.

If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend to be
run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed.
Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Bhavya,

I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider
Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior in
interacting with cyberspace?

I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in this
context. From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination
antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more
sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this
year. It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party antivirus
or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death of
your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a virus
to each other. That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs
simultaneously. Every third party product I know of, including those you've
named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed and
reenable it if they are uninstalled.

I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons and the
fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden) or
Avast. Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution about
these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on
BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
a.. AVG privacy policy update allows it to sell your browsing history
b.. Avast and AVG Antivirus products collect personal data for selling to
advertisers
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance
advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other
products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET
or Emsisoft Anti-Malware.
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft
Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message.

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting any
infection is quite low. I have been using Windows Defender now for a
couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before that,
and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just
fine. But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no
antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a decade
now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by
your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get one
later. It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of these
programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe
Computing.
--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot level on
request - it changes too often to keep in signature)
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the
opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

~ Niels Bohr






Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I'm using superantispyware as well as defender/msse. Most dodgy stuff coming in from others seems to get swatted by one or the other, though it has to be said most are not actually malware, more adware in fact.

I have tried some of the other anti virus software about for free, and do not reckon any of them offer anything over the current stuff. As many have said before I'm sure, if you are the unfortunate person to encounter something so new nobody has figured out how to block it yet, then nothing in the world is going to save you. Your best defence as always is question all emails with links and all links to web sites you are not familiar with and of course all links that look slightly wrong to be the real thing.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "enes sarıbaş" <enes.saribas@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 5:59 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


hi,

correction: avg was acquired by avast, not avira.


On 7/13/2017 7:26 AM, Bhavya shah wrote:
Hi Brian and Gene,
Alright, thanks for the clarifications about any third-party anti
virus program I choose to utilize not being complimentary but
substitutive.a replacement. Whilst my Internet records are quite
clean, I require to interact with multiple USB flashdrives which again
are a great agent of spreading viruses, which I may or may not always
be able to quickly scan before copying a file over quickly and
ejecting. Additionally, while I may not be completely cogent or
objective in my desire to install an alternative anti-virus software,
I have had recent problems with my computer, and those started around
the time Windows Defender started giving alerts of detecting threats
and removing them. All in all, I reckon a supposedly more 'advanced?'
option may prove productive as a long term measures, thus the
question. Since AVG and Avast are such, and Avira, I believe, was
acquired by Avast in the recent past, would Sophos be an obvious
recommendation indirectly? The other programs Brian mentioned aren't
accessibility-vouched, plus I am somewhat hesitant to be adventurous
at the present instant (due to upcoming school examinations).
Apologies for any lack of proactivity from my end in terms of
thoroughly exploring and analysing all available options.
Thanks.

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order. You can run more than
one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more than
one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination
antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other
straight antivirus program or combination program. If you want to know what
program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or
combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be
addressed.

If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend to be
run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed.
Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Bhavya,

I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider
Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior in
interacting with cyberspace?

I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in this
context. From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination
antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more
sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this
year. It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party antivirus
or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death of
your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a virus
to each other. That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs
simultaneously. Every third party product I know of, including those you've
named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed and
reenable it if they are uninstalled.

I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons and the
fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden) or
Avast. Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution about
these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on
BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
a.. AVG privacy policy update allows it to sell your browsing history
b.. Avast and AVG Antivirus products collect personal data for selling to
advertisers
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance
advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other
products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET
or Emsisoft Anti-Malware.
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft
Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message.

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting any
infection is quite low. I have been using Windows Defender now for a
couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before that,
and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just
fine. But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no
antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a decade
now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by
your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get one
later. It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of these
programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe
Computing.
--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot level on
request - it changes too often to keep in signature)
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the
opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

~ Niels Bohr







 

You know thats why I have remained with msse.

An antivirus program should be a guide only unless you are not an average user.

A gamer who needs to access sites all over the place, a torrenter, hacker, or other geek.

You like to fiddle about, etc.

Or you are a student, sadly universities are rampent with viruses in fact every summesta in my local one, all computers are reformatted and restored.

When asking admins about setting things up they told me to use my system it would have to have spaciffic software and hardware on it, only certain security software was used, etc.

Even with these in place, it is impossible to keep viruses fully out of systems.

Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on them at all times.

Reality was that once infected due to the amount of systems its just not possible to locate every infection if at all due to the large ariea and these people use majorly big toolsets like trend micro, mcafee, norton and nod32 at the time.

I have yet to try super antispyware but still.

On 13/07/2017 8:29 p.m., Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io wrote:
I'm using superantispyware as well as defender/msse. Most dodgy stuff coming in from others seems to get swatted by one or the other, though it has to be said most are not actually malware, more adware in fact.

I have tried some of the other anti virus software about for free, and do not reckon any of them offer anything over the current stuff. As many have said before I'm sure, if you are the unfortunate person to encounter something so new nobody has figured out how to block it yet, then nothing in the world is going to save you. Your best defence as always is question all emails with links and all links to web sites you are not familiar with and of course all links that look slightly wrong to be the real thing.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "enes sarıbaş" <enes.saribas@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 5:59 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


hi,

correction: avg was acquired by avast, not avira.


On 7/13/2017 7:26 AM, Bhavya shah wrote:
Hi Brian and Gene,
Alright, thanks for the clarifications about any third-party anti
virus program I choose to utilize not being complimentary but
substitutive.a replacement. Whilst my Internet records are quite
clean, I require to interact with multiple USB flashdrives which again
are a great agent of spreading viruses, which I may or may not always
be able to quickly scan before copying a file over quickly and
ejecting. Additionally, while I may not be completely cogent or
objective in my desire to install an alternative anti-virus software,
I have had recent problems with my computer, and those started around
the time Windows Defender started giving alerts of detecting threats
and removing them. All in all, I reckon a supposedly more 'advanced?'
option may prove productive as a long term measures, thus the
question. Since AVG and Avast are such, and Avira, I believe, was
acquired by Avast in the recent past, would Sophos be an obvious
recommendation indirectly? The other programs Brian mentioned aren't
accessibility-vouched, plus I am somewhat hesitant to be adventurous
at the present instant (due to upcoming school examinations).
Apologies for any lack of proactivity from my end in terms of
thoroughly exploring and analysing all available options.
Thanks.

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order. You can run more than
one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more than
one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination
antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other
straight antivirus program or combination program. If you want to know what
program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or
combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be
addressed.

If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend to be
run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed.
Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Bhavya,

I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider
Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior in
interacting with cyberspace?

I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in this
context. From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination
antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more
sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this
year. It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party antivirus
or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death of
your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a virus
to each other. That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs
simultaneously. Every third party product I know of, including those you've
named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed and
reenable it if they are uninstalled.

I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons and the
fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden) or
Avast. Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution about
these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on
BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
a.. AVG privacy policy update allows it to sell your browsing history
b.. Avast and AVG Antivirus products collect personal data for selling to
advertisers
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance
advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other
products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend ESET
or Emsisoft Anti-Malware.
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft
Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message.

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting any
infection is quite low. I have been using Windows Defender now for a
couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before that,
and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just
fine. But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no
antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a decade
now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by
your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get one
later. It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of these
programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe
Computing.
--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot level on
request - it changes too often to keep in signature)
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the
opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

~ Niels Bohr










Antony Stone
 

This is a ridiculous comment.

It's true that some people's computers do get infected with viruses from time
to time (and, of course, some organisations' networks get infected too), but
to suggest that "all systems have or will have viruses on them at all times"
is just ridiculous scare-mongering.


Antony.

On Thursday 13 July 2017 at 09:53:09, Shaun Everiss wrote:

Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on
them at all times.
--
We all get the same amount of time - twenty-four hours per day.
How you use it is up to you.

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

If it were that easy not to get malware, then we wouldn't need antimalware programs.  Taking precautions is important but it's hardly any sort of guarantee or close to it, that you won't get malware.  Enough malware can be contracted with the user simply going to a web site and taking no other action, that making it sound as though such precautions as you state is more or less going to prevent malware contraction is misleading and leads to a false sense of security. 

To significantly reduce risks from such sites, using ad blockers and a script blocker or not allowing JAVA scripts to run unless they are needed are significant security enhancers.  Using a good antimalware program or programs with real time protection can significantly protect you against such risks as well.  You may want to take all these precautions or just run a really good antimalware program or programs, but just not doing things such as opening attachments, while important, is not adequate.
 
Sophos has gotten very favorable comments from just about all blind users whose comments I've seen.  I would bet that it gets much higher ratings than Windows Defender in properly done reviews, but I'll leave that for those who are interested enough to check for themselves.  It would be used in place of Windows Defender, not in conjunction with Windows Defender.  And if you are having problems with your computer that you think may be the result of malware, getting sighted help and asking Bleeping Computer for help in thoroughly checking for and removing malware would be a good idea.  Some of the procedures that will be recommended may require sighted assistance.  I don't know that but I suspect it.  Bleeping Computer has volunteer geeks who help with malware.  it is one of the major activities of the site. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 3:29 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?

I'm using superantispyware as well as defender/msse. Most dodgy stuff coming
in from others seems to get swatted by one or the other, though it has to be
said most are not actually malware, more adware in fact.

I have tried some of the other anti virus software about for free, and do
not reckon any of them offer anything over the current stuff. As many have
said before I'm sure, if you are the unfortunate person to encounter
something so new nobody has figured out how to block it yet, then nothing in
the world is going to save you. Your best defence as always is  question all
emails with links and all links to web sites you are not familiar with and
of course all links that look slightly wrong to be the real thing.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "enes sarıbaş" <enes.saribas@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 5:59 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


> hi,
>
> correction: avg was acquired by avast, not avira.
>
>
> On 7/13/2017 7:26 AM, Bhavya shah wrote:
>> Hi Brian and Gene,
>> Alright, thanks for the clarifications about any third-party anti
>> virus program I choose to utilize not being complimentary but
>> substitutive.a replacement. Whilst my Internet records are quite
>> clean, I require to interact with multiple USB flashdrives which again
>> are a great agent of spreading viruses, which I may or may not always
>> be able to quickly scan before copying a file over quickly and
>> ejecting. Additionally, while I may not be completely cogent or
>> objective in my desire to install an alternative anti-virus software,
>> I have had recent problems with my computer, and those started around
>> the time Windows Defender started giving alerts of detecting threats
>> and removing them. All in all, I reckon a supposedly more 'advanced?'
>> option may prove productive as a long term measures, thus the
>> question. Since AVG and Avast are such, and Avira, I believe, was
>> acquired by Avast in the recent past, would Sophos be an obvious
>> recommendation indirectly? The other programs Brian mentioned aren't
>> accessibility-vouched, plus I am somewhat hesitant to be adventurous
>> at the present instant (due to upcoming school examinations).
>> Apologies for any lack of proactivity from my end in terms of
>> thoroughly exploring and analysing all available options.
>> Thanks.
>>
>> On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
>>> A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order.  You can run more
>>> than
>>> one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more
>>> than
>>> one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination
>>> antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other
>>> straight antivirus program or combination program.  If you want to know
>>> what
>>> program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or
>>> combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be
>>> addressed.
>>>
>>> If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend
>>> to be
>>> run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed.
>>> Gene
>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Brian Vogel
>>> Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
>>> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
>>> Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?
>>>
>>>
>>> Bhavya,
>>>
>>>             I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider
>>> Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior
>>> in
>>> interacting with cyberspace?
>>>
>>>             I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in
>>> this
>>> context.   From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination
>>> antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more
>>> sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this
>>> year.   It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party
>>> antivirus
>>> or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death
>>> of
>>> your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a
>>> virus
>>> to each other.  That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs
>>> simultaneously.  Every third party product I know of, including those
>>> you've
>>> named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed
>>> and
>>> reenable it if they are uninstalled.
>>>
>>>            I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons
>>> and the
>>> fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden)
>>> or
>>> Avast.  Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution
>>> about
>>> these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on
>>> BleepingComputer.com:
>>> ---------------------------
>>> You may want to read...
>>>    a.. AVG privacy policy update allows it to sell your browsing history
>>>    b.. Avast and AVG Antivirus products collect personal data for
>>> selling to
>>> advertisers
>>> More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance
>>> advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other
>>> products.
>>>
>>> See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend
>>> ESET
>>> or Emsisoft Anti-Malware.
>>> ------------------------------------
>>>
>>> I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft
>>> Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message.
>>>
>>> If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting
>>> any
>>> infection is quite low.   I have been using Windows Defender now for a
>>> couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before
>>> that,
>>> and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just
>>> fine.  But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no
>>> antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a
>>> decade
>>> now.
>>>
>>> Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by
>>> your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get
>>> one
>>> later.  It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of
>>> these
>>> programs keeps you 100% safe, either.
>>>
>>> See quietman7's  comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe
>>> Computing.
>>> --
>>> Brian  - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level
>>> on
>>> request - it changes too often to keep in signature)
>>>       The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the
>>> opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.
>>>
>>>              ~ Niels Bohr
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
>
>




 

You may be right I do run off and on malwarebytes, I do have an add block and script blocker on firefox, never leave home without these.

I haven't as yet installed sophos yet but I do have an account.

On 13/07/2017 9:01 p.m., Gene wrote:
If it were that easy not to get malware, then we wouldn't need antimalware programs. Taking precautions is important but it's hardly any sort of guarantee or close to it, that you won't get malware. Enough malware can be contracted with the user simply going to a web site and taking no other action, that making it sound as though such precautions as you state is more or less going to prevent malware contraction is misleading and leads to a false sense of security.

To significantly reduce risks from such sites, using ad blockers and a script blocker or not allowing JAVA scripts to run unless they are needed are significant security enhancers. Using a good antimalware program or programs with real time protection can significantly protect you against such risks as well. You may want to take all these precautions or just run a really good antimalware program or programs, but just not doing things such as opening attachments, while important, is not adequate.

Sophos has gotten very favorable comments from just about all blind users whose comments I've seen. I would bet that it gets much higher ratings than Windows Defender in properly done reviews, but I'll leave that for those who are interested enough to check for themselves. It would be used in place of Windows Defender, not in conjunction with Windows Defender. And if you are having problems with your computer that you think may be the result of malware, getting sighted help and asking Bleeping Computer for help in thoroughly checking for and removing malware would be a good idea. Some of the procedures that will be recommended may require sighted assistance. I don't know that but I suspect it. Bleeping Computer has volunteer geeks who help with malware. it is one of the major activities of the site.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 3:29 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


I'm using superantispyware as well as defender/msse. Most dodgy stuff coming
in from others seems to get swatted by one or the other, though it has to be
said most are not actually malware, more adware in fact.

I have tried some of the other anti virus software about for free, and do
not reckon any of them offer anything over the current stuff. As many have
said before I'm sure, if you are the unfortunate person to encounter
something so new nobody has figured out how to block it yet, then nothing in
the world is going to save you. Your best defence as always is question all
emails with links and all links to web sites you are not familiar with and
of course all links that look slightly wrong to be the real thing.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "enes sarıbaş" <enes.saribas@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 5:59 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


hi,

correction: avg was acquired by avast, not avira.


On 7/13/2017 7:26 AM, Bhavya shah wrote:
Hi Brian and Gene,
Alright, thanks for the clarifications about any third-party anti
virus program I choose to utilize not being complimentary but
substitutive.a replacement. Whilst my Internet records are quite
clean, I require to interact with multiple USB flashdrives which again
are a great agent of spreading viruses, which I may or may not always
be able to quickly scan before copying a file over quickly and
ejecting. Additionally, while I may not be completely cogent or
objective in my desire to install an alternative anti-virus software,
I have had recent problems with my computer, and those started around
the time Windows Defender started giving alerts of detecting threats
and removing them. All in all, I reckon a supposedly more 'advanced?'
option may prove productive as a long term measures, thus the
question. Since AVG and Avast are such, and Avira, I believe, was
acquired by Avast in the recent past, would Sophos be an obvious
recommendation indirectly? The other programs Brian mentioned aren't
accessibility-vouched, plus I am somewhat hesitant to be adventurous
at the present instant (due to upcoming school examinations).
Apologies for any lack of proactivity from my end in terms of
thoroughly exploring and analysing all available options.
Thanks.

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
A bit of expansion and clarification may be in order. You can run more
than
one antispyware program, such as Malware Bytes but you can't run more
than
one antivirus program or more than one program that is a combination
antivirus program and antispyware program in combination with any other
straight antivirus program or combination program. If you want to know
what
program to run in place of Windows Defender that is an antivirus or
combination antivirus and antimalware program, that question can be
addressed.

If you want to know what straight antispyware program people recommend
to be
run in addition to what you are running now, that can also be addressed.
Gene
----- Original Message -----


From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 1:39 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Bhavya,

I am not trying to be argumentative, but why do you consider
Windows Defender "insufficient" given your own self-described behavior
in
interacting with cyberspace?

I am also confused as to what you mean by "complement," in
this
context. From Windows 8 and onward Windows Defender is a combination
antivirus/antimalware and is rapidly morphing into a still far more
sophisticated product with the cloud-based components coming later this
year. It cannot be run on a system that's running a third-party
antivirus
or security suite as they'd engage each other in a battle to the death
of
your system since antivirus products use techniques that look like a
virus
to each other. That's why you cannot ever run two antivirus programs
simultaneously. Every third party product I know of, including those
you've
named, automatically disable Windows Defender when they are installed
and
reenable it if they are uninstalled.

I would not consider either AVG (for accessibility reasons
and the
fact that it's become insanely oversensitive and false positive laden)
or
Avast. Here is what security expert quietman7 had to say as a caution
about
these two on the thread entitled, Looking for a good free Anti-Virus, on
BleepingComputer.com:
---------------------------
You may want to read...
a.. AVG privacy policy update allows it to sell your browsing history
b.. Avast and AVG Antivirus products collect personal data for
selling to
advertisers
More of a concern for most users, are the nagging pop-ups, nuisance
advertising and prompts to upgrade to the paid version or purchase other
products.

See my comments in Choosing an Anti-Virus Program as to why I recommend
ESET
or Emsisoft Anti-Malware.
------------------------------------

I cannot speak, at all, to the accessibility of ESET or Emsisoft
Anti-Malware, but I didn't want to alter his message.

If you engage in safe web browsing practices the probability of getting
any
infection is quite low. I have been using Windows Defender now for a
couple of years, after having used AVG for probably a decade before
that,
and Avast and Panda on a couple of other machines and it has worked just
fine. But, of course, I have little basis for saying that since no
antivirus product I've used has detected an infection for well over a
decade
now.

Your own history of having any viruses, malware, etc., ever picked up by
your scanners is the first and best predictor if you're likely to get
one
later. It's not a 100% accurate prediction, nothing is, but none of
these
programs keeps you 100% safe, either.

See quietman7's comments on Security Basics and Best Practices for Safe
Computing.
--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot level
on
request - it changes too often to keep in signature)
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the
opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

~ Niels Bohr








Kevin Huber
 

Hi Antony:

I think you are right, but it is better to assume the worst and hope
for the best. That way, you are less likely to be taken by surprise.
Kevin Huber

On 7/13/17, Antony Stone <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it> wrote:
This is a ridiculous comment.

It's true that some people's computers do get infected with viruses from
time
to time (and, of course, some organisations' networks get infected too), but

to suggest that "all systems have or will have viruses on them at all times"

is just ridiculous scare-mongering.


Antony.

On Thursday 13 July 2017 at 09:53:09, Shaun Everiss wrote:

Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on
them at all times.
--
We all get the same amount of time - twenty-four hours per day.
How you use it is up to you.

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't* CC
me.




Gene
 

It is better to base opinions on facts as much as possible rather than assuming or hoping based on a generalization unsupported by facts or statistics.  Assuming the worst can lead to not taking advantage of many online opportunities because of fear not based on what facts indicate should be one's attitude or approach.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 9:40 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?

Hi Antony:

I think you are right, but it is better to assume the worst and hope
for the best.  That way, you are less likely to be taken by surprise.
Kevin Huber

On 7/13/17, Antony Stone <antony.stone@...> wrote:
> This is a ridiculous comment.
>
> It's true that some people's computers do get infected with viruses from
> time
> to time (and, of course, some organisations' networks get infected too), but
>
> to suggest that "all systems have or will have viruses on them at all times"
>
> is just ridiculous scare-mongering.
>
>
> Antony.
>
> On Thursday 13 July 2017 at 09:53:09, Shaun Everiss wrote:
>
>> Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on
>> them at all times.
>
> --
> We all get the same amount of time - twenty-four hours per day.
> How you use it is up to you.
>
>                                                    Please reply to the
> list;
>                                                          please *don't* CC
> me.
>
>
>
>



Kevin Huber
 

Hi Gene:

You have a good point. In fact, I rthink that you are quite right I
never thought of the fact that one might become afraid to venture into
something new.

thanks for pointing that out.
Kevin

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
It is better to base opinions on facts as much as possible rather than
assuming or hoping based on a generalization unsupported by facts or
statistics. Assuming the worst can lead to not taking advantage of many
online opportunities because of fear not based on what facts indicate should
be one's attitude or approach.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin Huber
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 9:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Hi Antony:

I think you are right, but it is better to assume the worst and hope
for the best. That way, you are less likely to be taken by surprise.
Kevin Huber

On 7/13/17, Antony Stone <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it> wrote:
This is a ridiculous comment.

It's true that some people's computers do get infected with viruses from
time
to time (and, of course, some organisations' networks get infected too),
but

to suggest that "all systems have or will have viruses on them at all
times"

is just ridiculous scare-mongering.


Antony.

On Thursday 13 July 2017 at 09:53:09, Shaun Everiss wrote:

Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on
them at all times.
--
We all get the same amount of time - twenty-four hours per day.
How you use it is up to you.

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't*
CC
me.





Nimer Jaber
 

Hello,

I recommend Sophos here. It runs great on all machines I run it on, and it is accessible. It allows me to manage up to ten machines I believe, and just runs great. Highly recommend, and reviews are very favorable, although I have also seen some tech experts recommend that most users stick with MSE these days... still, call me old-school, I can't recommend that an individual run an anti-virus program by an OS vendor... let Microsoft do what they do well. Anyway, that is an opinion, and the ratings for MSE have gotten better lately.

In short, yes, I recommend Sophos.

On Thu, Jul 13, 2017 at 10:42 AM Kevin Huber <kevin.huber1@...> wrote:
Hi Gene:

You have a good point.  In fact, I rthink that you are quite right I
never thought of the fact that one might become afraid to venture into
something new.

thanks for pointing that out.
Kevin

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
> It is better to base opinions on facts as much as possible rather than
> assuming or hoping based on a generalization unsupported by facts or
> statistics.  Assuming the worst can lead to not taking advantage of many
> online opportunities because of fear not based on what facts indicate should
> be one's attitude or approach.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Kevin Huber
> Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 9:40 AM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?
>
>
> Hi Antony:
>
> I think you are right, but it is better to assume the worst and hope
> for the best.  That way, you are less likely to be taken by surprise.
> Kevin Huber
>
> On 7/13/17, Antony Stone <antony.stone@...> wrote:
>> This is a ridiculous comment.
>>
>> It's true that some people's computers do get infected with viruses from
>> time
>> to time (and, of course, some organisations' networks get infected too),
>> but
>>
>> to suggest that "all systems have or will have viruses on them at all
>> times"
>>
>> is just ridiculous scare-mongering.
>>
>>
>> Antony.
>>
>> On Thursday 13 July 2017 at 09:53:09, Shaun Everiss wrote:
>>
>>> Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on
>>> them at all times.
>>
>> --
>> We all get the same amount of time - twenty-four hours per day.
>> How you use it is up to you.
>>
>>                                                    Please reply to the
>> list;
>>                                                          please *don't*
>> CC
>> me.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>



--
Cordially,

Nimer Jaber

My mission is to bring love and peace to everyone around me with all tools available to me.
My core values are integrity, innovation, loyalty, excellence, and 100% personal responsibility.

The message above is intended for the recipient to whom it was
addressed. If you believe that you are not the intended recipient,
please notify me via reply email and destroy all copies of this
correspondence. Action taken as a result of this email or its contents
by anyone other than the intended recipient(s) may result in civil or
criminal charges. I have checked this email and all corresponding
attachments for security threats. However, security of your machine is
up to you. Thanks.

Registered Linux User 529141.
http://counter.li.org/

To find out about a free and versatile screen reader for windows XP
and above, please click here:
http://www.nvda-project.org

You can follow @nimerjaber on Twitter for the latest technology news.

To contact me, you can reply to this email or you may call me at (218-606-0475) and I will do my best to respond to you promptly. Thank
you, and have a great day!


Dejan Ristic
 

I use Avast! free antivirus on Windows 7, 64bit, but to make it NVDA-accessible, I am obliged to have self-defense turned off. It is also packaged with a browser called Avast Safe Zone Browser. It happens that I sometimes run into web pages Avast antivirus considers possibly dangerous, and it blocks me out of them so that I may not have access to them, even if I try it.

On 7/12/2017 8:12 PM, Bhavya shah wrote:
Dear all,
I use a Windows 8.1 machine, and usually evade all dodgy websites,
particularly ones involving social engineering. Thus, I am in need of
a simple, powerful and accessible anti-virus tool to compliment the
built-in Windows Defender (which I deem insufficient).
To thoroughly limit the scope of this question, because I am aware
that accessible anti-virus pertaining discussions have taken place
endlessly in the past, which of the following four would a general
consensus in the NVDA community recommend - Avast, Avira, AVG or
Sophos? Please note that my personal focus would lie only with the
free versions of the aforesaid programs.
I would truly appreciate any assistance.
Thanks.


Gene
 

I don't know if you can turn off features you don't want or do so accessibly.  You can remove features you don't want.  I don't know if the browser has features you want but if you don't know about the uninstallation option, you may want to ask more about it here.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 1:04 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?

I use Avast! free antivirus on Windows 7, 64bit, but to make it
NVDA-accessible, I am obliged to have self-defense turned off. It is
also packaged with a browser called Avast Safe Zone Browser. It happens
that I sometimes run into web pages Avast antivirus considers possibly
dangerous, and it blocks me out of them so that I may not have access to
them, even if I try it.


On 7/12/2017 8:12 PM, Bhavya shah wrote:
> Dear all,
> I use a Windows 8.1 machine, and usually evade all dodgy websites,
> particularly ones involving social engineering. Thus, I am in need of
> a simple, powerful and accessible anti-virus tool to compliment the
> built-in Windows Defender (which I deem insufficient).
> To thoroughly limit the scope of this question, because I am aware
> that accessible anti-virus pertaining discussions have taken place
> endlessly in the past, which of the following four would a general
> consensus in the NVDA community recommend - Avast, Avira, AVG or
> Sophos? Please note that my personal focus would lie only with the
> free versions of the aforesaid programs.
> I would truly appreciate any assistance.
> Thanks.
>





 

I would have to disagree, sophos killed several files immediately and I can't seem to find how to get them back all false positives stuff I had allready excluded in msse.

I sent a message to nvda list.

I may retry again as soon as I can get the system to work right again.

I have just restored the system again and luckily only lost one update to windows.

On 14/07/2017 4:35 a.m., Nimer Jaber wrote:
Hello,

I recommend Sophos here. It runs great on all machines I run it on, and it
is accessible. It allows me to manage up to ten machines I believe, and
just runs great. Highly recommend, and reviews are very favorable, although
I have also seen some tech experts recommend that most users stick with MSE
these days... still, call me old-school, I can't recommend that an
individual run an anti-virus program by an OS vendor... let Microsoft do
what they do well. Anyway, that is an opinion, and the ratings for MSE have
gotten better lately.

In short, yes, I recommend Sophos.

On Thu, Jul 13, 2017 at 10:42 AM Kevin Huber <kevin.huber1@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Gene:

You have a good point. In fact, I rthink that you are quite right I
never thought of the fact that one might become afraid to venture into
something new.

thanks for pointing that out.
Kevin

On 7/13/17, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:
It is better to base opinions on facts as much as possible rather than
assuming or hoping based on a generalization unsupported by facts or
statistics. Assuming the worst can lead to not taking advantage of many
online opportunities because of fear not based on what facts indicate
should
be one's attitude or approach.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Kevin Huber
Sent: Thursday, July 13, 2017 9:40 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Avast, Avira, AVG or Sophos?


Hi Antony:

I think you are right, but it is better to assume the worst and hope
for the best. That way, you are less likely to be taken by surprise.
Kevin Huber

On 7/13/17, Antony Stone <antony.stone@nvda.open.source.it> wrote:
This is a ridiculous comment.

It's true that some people's computers do get infected with viruses from
time
to time (and, of course, some organisations' networks get infected too),
but

to suggest that "all systems have or will have viruses on them at all
times"

is just ridiculous scare-mongering.


Antony.

On Thursday 13 July 2017 at 09:53:09, Shaun Everiss wrote:

Its a given that the systems all systems have or will have viruses on
them at all times.
--
We all get the same amount of time - twenty-four hours per day.
How you use it is up to you.

Please reply to the
list;
please *don't*
CC
me.




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Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Just for reference, and against comentary to the contrary, I run both avast and sophos home. Never had any problems, though avast does have a habbit of flagging any programs I write that have timing routines in them, so I have to jump through hoops in my code to make them appear not to be actually timing execution length. <sigh>

On 7/12/2017 2:12 PM, Bhavya shah wrote:
Dear all,
I use a Windows 8.1 machine, and usually evade all dodgy websites,
particularly ones involving social engineering. Thus, I am in need of
a simple, powerful and accessible anti-virus tool to compliment the
built-in Windows Defender (which I deem insufficient).
To thoroughly limit the scope of this question, because I am aware
that accessible anti-virus pertaining discussions have taken place
endlessly in the past, which of the following four would a general
consensus in the NVDA community recommend - Avast, Avira, AVG or
Sophos? Please note that my personal focus would lie only with the
free versions of the aforesaid programs.
I would truly appreciate any assistance.
Thanks.