Adobe Digital


MAYANK SHARMA
 

Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Mayank


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser.  An epub file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book compressed into a single file.  Simply unzip it, then find the directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml files), then just open each one with your browser.  It's not as nice as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and is actually my preferred method for reading epub books.  Your mileage may vary.

On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Mayank



heinrich@...
 

I have Adobe Digital  Editions 4.5 on a Windows  7 machine. I am a sighted user. With or without NVDA, the only way I could select text in an epub was using the mouse (and not getting voice feedback from NVDA in the process).  I could not locate a keyboard method to select text.


erik burggraaf <erik@...>
 

~I~t has been some time since I touched digital editions, but I thought the standard selection com`mands worked as long as those features weren't blocked by antipiracy measures.  In that case,  shift right arrow should select one letter to the right.  Control shift right arrow should select the next word to the right.  Shift down arrow should select one line elow, and so on.

Hope this helps,

Erik```````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````

On August 28, 2017 9:35:32 PM heinrich@... wrote:

I have Adobe Digital  Editions 4.5 on a Windows  7 machine. I am a sighted user. With or without NVDA, the only way I could select text in an epub was using the mouse (and not getting voice feedback from NVDA in the process).  I could not locate a keyboard method to select text.


James AUSTIN
 

Please forgive my question. An interesting approach, but why?

On 29/08/2017 02:21, Travis Siegel wrote:
I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser.  An epub file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book compressed into a single file.  Simply unzip it, then find the directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml files), then just open each one with your browser.  It's not as nice as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and is actually my preferred method for reading epub books.  Your mileage may vary.



On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
  Mayank






Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Several reasons.

First, it allows me to use my browser of choice, regardless of platform, which means it doesn't matter if I'm on windows, SX, linux, FreeBSD, or even dos, (admittedly, I don't use dos very often), so it's a truly crossplatform solution.

Second, I've never found an epub reader I liked.

It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.

Of course, this goes back to the whole I've never found an epub reader I like.  Most of the ones I've tried were completely inaccessible, and those that worked didn't work the way I thought they should.  I actually wrote my own epub reader (based on a slimmed down version of a web browser on OSX), but that code doesn't translate to windows, linux BSD or other operating systems, so that solution remains only on OSX.

Now, my solution of using a browser doesn't work with encrypted epub format, and for those you'll have to use some dedicated drm capable epub reader.  I tend to avoid drm whenever possible, and if drm is absolutely 100 percent unavoidable, I generally choose kindle format, since the kindle reader on the iphone is completely accessible and usable.  Failing that, I opt for pdf, because it's possible to solve that problem easier than other formats.  But, mainly the reason I read epub books with my browser is because it's the fastest and simplest method for me, and it's cross platform, which is important to me.  As I said, your mileage may vary.  Most folks don't care about whether their epub reader works on multiple platforms, and even more folks aren't even aware it's possible to read epub books with anything except 1 or 2 programs, and personally, I'm all about choice.  I think the more options someone has to accomplish something, the better off said person is.  So, by letting folks know that epub is (generally) just html files that work just fine in your browser, I offer another solution for folks to read epub formats for themselves if something happens and their current method stops working.

On 8/29/2017 1:36 PM, James AUSTIN wrote:
Please forgive my question. An interesting approach, but why?


On 29/08/2017 02:21, Travis Siegel wrote:
I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser.  An epub file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book compressed into a single file. Simply unzip it, then find the directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml files), then just open each one with your browser.  It's not as nice as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and is actually my preferred method for reading epub books.  Your mileage may vary.



On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
  Mayank









James AUSTIN
 

Thanks Travis a font of knowledge as always. I share your sentiment re choice. I did not know taht the epub format was essentially a .zip file. I thought it ws a 'rapper' for the internal HTML/XML files, or is that the same thing?

On 29/08/2017 19:07, Travis Siegel wrote:
Several reasons.

First, it allows me to use my browser of choice, regardless of platform, which means it doesn't matter if I'm on windows, SX, linux, FreeBSD, or even dos, (admittedly, I don't use dos very often), so it's a truly crossplatform solution.

Second, I've never found an epub reader I liked.

It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.

Of course, this goes back to the whole I've never found an epub reader I like.  Most of the ones I've tried were completely inaccessible, and those that worked didn't work the way I thought they should.  I actually wrote my own epub reader (based on a slimmed down version of a web browser on OSX), but that code doesn't translate to windows, linux BSD or other operating systems, so that solution remains only on OSX.

Now, my solution of using a browser doesn't work with encrypted epub format, and for those you'll have to use some dedicated drm capable epub reader.  I tend to avoid drm whenever possible, and if drm is absolutely 100 percent unavoidable, I generally choose kindle format, since the kindle reader on the iphone is completely accessible and usable.  Failing that, I opt for pdf, because it's possible to solve that problem easier than other formats.  But, mainly the reason I read epub books with my browser is because it's the fastest and simplest method for me, and it's cross platform, which is important to me.  As I said, your mileage may vary.  Most folks don't care about whether their epub reader works on multiple platforms, and even more folks aren't even aware it's possible to read epub books with anything except 1 or 2 programs, and personally, I'm all about choice.  I think the more options someone has to accomplish something, the better off said person is.  So, by letting folks know that epub is (generally) just html files that work just fine in your browser, I offer another solution for folks to read epub formats for themselves if something happens and their current method stops working.



On 8/29/2017 1:36 PM, James AUSTIN wrote:
Please forgive my question. An interesting approach, but why?


On 29/08/2017 02:21, Travis Siegel wrote:
I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser.  An epub file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book compressed into a single file. Simply unzip it, then find the directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml files), then just open each one with your browser.  It's not as nice as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and is actually my preferred method for reading epub books.  Your mileage may vary.



On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
  Mayank












Rob
 

Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.

Um, why not just use Calibre (which is cross platform too, by the way) to convert .epub to .htmlz and read it that way. No skipping around in the address bar, with split000.html and split00001.html.


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

The zip file is simply a collection of all of the files in the epub format, (usually in multiple directories), one of those directories is the actual book content, and it's name varies depending on what epub creater was used to make the book, but it's usually relatively easy to find, (just look for the directory that has multiple xml/html files).  Simply enter that directory, and select any file you like, they're usually named with chapter numbers at the end of their name, though some of the names are a mile long for obscure reasons nobody but the epub creater knows, so wading through all that to get to the actual numbers at the end is sometimes a chore.  I have actually written both unix shell scripts, and windows batch files to rename these files to just their chapter numbers, because I don't need all the artifacts relating to creation, since I'm not actually using their prebuilt table of contents, so names don't need to match for me.

But in any case, after the files are named properly, it's simple enough to click on the 0000 or 0001 file, then to move to the next one, I just change the address in my browser, which is usually as simple as pressing control-l, pressing end, then backspace, then the new number, then press enter.  Very fast and simple.  Again, for folks who like their guis (I am not one of those people), you might want to stick to the epub reader you're using now, but I find having complete access to the book via web browser suits my purposes just fine.

On 8/29/2017 2:43 PM, James AUSTIN wrote:
Thanks Travis a font of knowledge as always. I share your sentiment re choice. I did not know taht the epub format was essentially a .zip file. I thought it ws a 'rapper' for the internal HTML/XML files, or is that the same thing?


On 29/08/2017 19:07, Travis Siegel wrote:
Several reasons.

First, it allows me to use my browser of choice, regardless of platform, which means it doesn't matter if I'm on windows, SX, linux, FreeBSD, or even dos, (admittedly, I don't use dos very often), so it's a truly crossplatform solution.

Second, I've never found an epub reader I liked.

It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.

Of course, this goes back to the whole I've never found an epub reader I like.  Most of the ones I've tried were completely inaccessible, and those that worked didn't work the way I thought they should.  I actually wrote my own epub reader (based on a slimmed down version of a web browser on OSX), but that code doesn't translate to windows, linux BSD or other operating systems, so that solution remains only on OSX.

Now, my solution of using a browser doesn't work with encrypted epub format, and for those you'll have to use some dedicated drm capable epub reader.  I tend to avoid drm whenever possible, and if drm is absolutely 100 percent unavoidable, I generally choose kindle format, since the kindle reader on the iphone is completely accessible and usable.  Failing that, I opt for pdf, because it's possible to solve that problem easier than other formats.  But, mainly the reason I read epub books with my browser is because it's the fastest and simplest method for me, and it's cross platform, which is important to me.  As I said, your mileage may vary.  Most folks don't care about whether their epub reader works on multiple platforms, and even more folks aren't even aware it's possible to read epub books with anything except 1 or 2 programs, and personally, I'm all about choice.  I think the more options someone has to accomplish something, the better off said person is.  So, by letting folks know that epub is (generally) just html files that work just fine in your browser, I offer another solution for folks to read epub formats for themselves if something happens and their current method stops working.



On 8/29/2017 1:36 PM, James AUSTIN wrote:
Please forgive my question. An interesting approach, but why?


On 29/08/2017 02:21, Travis Siegel wrote:
I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser.  An epub file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book compressed into a single file. Simply unzip it, then find the directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml files), then just open each one with your browser.  It's not as nice as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and is actually my preferred method for reading epub books.  Your mileage may vary.



On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
  Mayank















Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

Mostly because calibre uses a *lot* of resources, and when I extract the epub files, I don't use any resources at all just clicking on them (well, on the first one), to load it into my browser, after that, the only thing I need to change is the last 1 or 2 digits in the address bar, and that's real simple.  I only change the names of the files to make it easier for me, it's actually not necessary.

And, besides, why should I convert html to html, it's a waste of time.  The epub books are already html format, and I see no reason to use a 3rd party program to simply make their names more convenient for myself, when I can do that myself.

On 8/29/2017 4:15 PM, Rob wrote:
Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.
Um, why not just use Calibre (which is cross platform too, by the way) to convert .epub to .htmlz and read it that way. No skipping around in the address bar, with split000.html and split00001.html.



Jitendra Kumar
 

Just for information: if any of you use firefox, an extension epub
reader is a great thing, and it has next and previous chapter buttons,
and the layout is divided in frames, the first frame is the navigation
pane, second is the main document and last for next and previous
buttons.
it is very accessible, and you can open any epub file using open file
dialog from the firefox.
Hth, thank you.

On 8/30/17, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
Mostly because calibre uses a *lot* of resources, and when I extract the
epub files, I don't use any resources at all just clicking on them
(well, on the first one), to load it into my browser, after that, the
only thing I need to change is the last 1 or 2 digits in the address
bar, and that's real simple.  I only change the names of the files to
make it easier for me, it's actually not necessary.

And, besides, why should I convert html to html, it's a waste of time.
The epub books are already html format, and I see no reason to use a 3rd
party program to simply make their names more convenient for myself,
when I can do that myself.


On 8/29/2017 4:15 PM, Rob wrote:
Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.
Um, why not just use Calibre (which is cross platform too, by the way) to
convert .epub to .htmlz and read it that way. No skipping around in the
address bar, with split000.html and split00001.html.







--
Skype:
Jeet.delhi


MAYANK SHARMA
 

Hi.

That's the problem I'm facing. I'm unable to select text using the keyboard.
Just to confirm, can we highlight and mark the text and go back to it
for our reference? that's what I understood when I read the help.

Erik

No the general commands aren't working for this on the keyboard. I've
tried it. Maybe it could be the recent version. I do remember I was
able to select text on an old version of the software.

Cheers

Mayank

On 8/29/17, heinrich@... <heinrich@...> wrote:
I have Adobe Digital Editions 4.5 on a Windows 7 machine. I am a sighted
user. With or without NVDA, the only way I could select text in an epub was
using the mouse (and not getting voice feedback from NVDA in the process).
I could not locate a keyboard method to select text.


MAYANK SHARMA
 

Hi.

it's useful to know. Going through some previous mails I did learn
that this format is files zipped together. But how do you unsip or
extract them to be able to use it.

It's still handy. for me, to have a software that opens Epub directly.
except the work around marking specific text to go back to, it seems
accessible.

If I open it in my browser, do I have an option of creating bookmarks?
Could be a generic question but I don't know of a way yet so I can go
back to text I last read, or highlight certain portions to go back to
if I need to refer to them in a meeting.


Thanks

Cheers
M

On 8/29/17, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
Several reasons.

First, it allows me to use my browser of choice, regardless of platform,
which means it doesn't matter if I'm on windows, SX, linux, FreeBSD, or
even dos, (admittedly, I don't use dos very often), so it's a truly
crossplatform solution.

Second, I've never found an epub reader I liked.

It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.

Of course, this goes back to the whole I've never found an epub reader I
like. Most of the ones I've tried were completely inaccessible, and
those that worked didn't work the way I thought they should. I actually
wrote my own epub reader (based on a slimmed down version of a web
browser on OSX), but that code doesn't translate to windows, linux BSD
or other operating systems, so that solution remains only on OSX.

Now, my solution of using a browser doesn't work with encrypted epub
format, and for those you'll have to use some dedicated drm capable epub
reader. I tend to avoid drm whenever possible, and if drm is absolutely
100 percent unavoidable, I generally choose kindle format, since the
kindle reader on the iphone is completely accessible and usable.
Failing that, I opt for pdf, because it's possible to solve that problem
easier than other formats. But, mainly the reason I read epub books
with my browser is because it's the fastest and simplest method for me,
and it's cross platform, which is important to me. As I said, your
mileage may vary. Most folks don't care about whether their epub reader
works on multiple platforms, and even more folks aren't even aware it's
possible to read epub books with anything except 1 or 2 programs, and
personally, I'm all about choice. I think the more options someone has
to accomplish something, the better off said person is. So, by letting
folks know that epub is (generally) just html files that work just fine
in your browser, I offer another solution for folks to read epub formats
for themselves if something happens and their current method stops working.



On 8/29/2017 1:36 PM, James AUSTIN wrote:
Please forgive my question. An interesting approach, but why?


On 29/08/2017 02:21, Travis Siegel wrote:
I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser. An epub
file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book
compressed into a single file. Simply unzip it, then find the
directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml
files), then just open each one with your browser. It's not as nice
as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next
chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and
is actually my preferred method for reading epub books. Your mileage
may vary.



On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Mayank














MAYANK SHARMA
 

Thanks. will have a look. Good to know of the options I have so I can
choos the best one depending on what I need.

Cheers
M

On 8/31/17, Jitendra Kumar <jeet.invincible@...> wrote:
Just for information: if any of you use firefox, an extension epub
reader is a great thing, and it has next and previous chapter buttons,
and the layout is divided in frames, the first frame is the navigation
pane, second is the main document and last for next and previous
buttons.
it is very accessible, and you can open any epub file using open file
dialog from the firefox.
Hth, thank you.

On 8/30/17, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
Mostly because calibre uses a *lot* of resources, and when I extract the
epub files, I don't use any resources at all just clicking on them
(well, on the first one), to load it into my browser, after that, the
only thing I need to change is the last 1 or 2 digits in the address
bar, and that's real simple. I only change the names of the files to
make it easier for me, it's actually not necessary.

And, besides, why should I convert html to html, it's a waste of time.
The epub books are already html format, and I see no reason to use a 3rd
party program to simply make their names more convenient for myself,
when I can do that myself.


On 8/29/2017 4:15 PM, Rob wrote:
Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next
links.
Um, why not just use Calibre (which is cross platform too, by the way)
to
convert .epub to .htmlz and read it that way. No skipping around in the
address bar, with split000.html and split00001.html.








--
Skype:
Jeet.delhi




Brian's Mail list account
 

What is it called on the add on store?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jitendra Kumar" <jeet.invincible@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2017 2:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Adobe Digital


Just for information: if any of you use firefox, an extension epub
reader is a great thing, and it has next and previous chapter buttons,
and the layout is divided in frames, the first frame is the navigation
pane, second is the main document and last for next and previous
buttons.
it is very accessible, and you can open any epub file using open file
dialog from the firefox.
Hth, thank you.

On 8/30/17, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
Mostly because calibre uses a *lot* of resources, and when I extract the
epub files, I don't use any resources at all just clicking on them
(well, on the first one), to load it into my browser, after that, the
only thing I need to change is the last 1 or 2 digits in the address
bar, and that's real simple. I only change the names of the files to
make it easier for me, it's actually not necessary.

And, besides, why should I convert html to html, it's a waste of time.
The epub books are already html format, and I see no reason to use a 3rd
party program to simply make their names more convenient for myself,
when I can do that myself.


On 8/29/2017 4:15 PM, Rob wrote:
Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.
Um, why not just use Calibre (which is cross platform too, by the way) to
convert .epub to .htmlz and read it that way. No skipping around in the
address bar, with split000.html and split00001.html.








--
Skype:
Jeet.delhi


Jitendra Kumar
 

it is lucifox, and yes for mayank, you can use your screen-reader's
jump to line or placemarker feature to return to and set a location.
since the content is in virtual buffer, try selecting the text and see
what it brings.

On 9/1/17, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io
<bglists@...> wrote:
What is it called on the add on store?
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jitendra Kumar" <jeet.invincible@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2017 2:18 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Adobe Digital


Just for information: if any of you use firefox, an extension epub
reader is a great thing, and it has next and previous chapter buttons,
and the layout is divided in frames, the first frame is the navigation
pane, second is the main document and last for next and previous
buttons.
it is very accessible, and you can open any epub file using open file
dialog from the firefox.
Hth, thank you.

On 8/30/17, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
Mostly because calibre uses a *lot* of resources, and when I extract the
epub files, I don't use any resources at all just clicking on them
(well, on the first one), to load it into my browser, after that, the
only thing I need to change is the last 1 or 2 digits in the address
bar, and that's real simple. I only change the names of the files to
make it easier for me, it's actually not necessary.

And, besides, why should I convert html to html, it's a waste of time.
The epub books are already html format, and I see no reason to use a 3rd
party program to simply make their names more convenient for myself,
when I can do that myself.


On 8/29/2017 4:15 PM, Rob wrote:
Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next
links.
Um, why not just use Calibre (which is cross platform too, by the way)
to
convert .epub to .htmlz and read it that way. No skipping around in the
address bar, with split000.html and split00001.html.








--
Skype:
Jeet.delhi







--
Skype:
Jeet.delhi


Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...>
 

It's a zip file, you'd open it the same way you'd open any zip file on your machine.

As for marking text, that is a function of the epub reader, not the epub format itself.  A web browser allows highlighting of text, in which case you could just copy it to a notes file or something similar, but no, reading it on the borwser isn't going to give you features that don't exist in the browser, it's simply a web page, nothing more nothing less.

Like I said, reading with a browser may not work for you, and that's fine, it's just another option for folks that don't have epub readers, or (like me) haven't found one they like.

On 8/31/2017 11:01 AM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi.

it's useful to know. Going through some previous mails I did learn
that this format is files zipped together. But how do you unsip or
extract them to be able to use it.

It's still handy. for me, to have a software that opens Epub directly.
except the work around marking specific text to go back to, it seems
accessible.

If I open it in my browser, do I have an option of creating bookmarks?
Could be a generic question but I don't know of a way yet so I can go
back to text I last read, or highlight certain portions to go back to
if I need to refer to them in a meeting.


Thanks

Cheers
M









On 8/29/17, Travis Siegel <tsiegel@...> wrote:
Several reasons.

First, it allows me to use my browser of choice, regardless of platform,
which means it doesn't matter if I'm on windows, SX, linux, FreeBSD, or
even dos, (admittedly, I don't use dos very often), so it's a truly
crossplatform solution.

Second, I've never found an epub reader I liked.

It's a lot easier for me to change a number in the address bar of my
browser to move through the pages/chapters than it is to hunt around on
some inaccessible interface, trying to find the previous and next links.

Of course, this goes back to the whole I've never found an epub reader I
like. Most of the ones I've tried were completely inaccessible, and
those that worked didn't work the way I thought they should. I actually
wrote my own epub reader (based on a slimmed down version of a web
browser on OSX), but that code doesn't translate to windows, linux BSD
or other operating systems, so that solution remains only on OSX.

Now, my solution of using a browser doesn't work with encrypted epub
format, and for those you'll have to use some dedicated drm capable epub
reader. I tend to avoid drm whenever possible, and if drm is absolutely
100 percent unavoidable, I generally choose kindle format, since the
kindle reader on the iphone is completely accessible and usable.
Failing that, I opt for pdf, because it's possible to solve that problem
easier than other formats. But, mainly the reason I read epub books
with my browser is because it's the fastest and simplest method for me,
and it's cross platform, which is important to me. As I said, your
mileage may vary. Most folks don't care about whether their epub reader
works on multiple platforms, and even more folks aren't even aware it's
possible to read epub books with anything except 1 or 2 programs, and
personally, I'm all about choice. I think the more options someone has
to accomplish something, the better off said person is. So, by letting
folks know that epub is (generally) just html files that work just fine
in your browser, I offer another solution for folks to read epub formats
for themselves if something happens and their current method stops working.



On 8/29/2017 1:36 PM, James AUSTIN wrote:
Please forgive my question. An interesting approach, but why?


On 29/08/2017 02:21, Travis Siegel wrote:
I don't use anything for epub ebooks except my web browser. An epub
file is just a zip file that has all the content of the book
compressed into a single file. Simply unzip it, then find the
directory with the book files in it(they'll be either html or xml
files), then just open each one with your browser. It's not as nice
as an epub reader, because it lacks the previous and next
chapter/page links an epub reader will have, but it works for me, and
is actually my preferred method for reading epub books. Your mileage
may vary.



On 8/28/2017 12:20 PM, MAYANK SHARMA wrote:
Hi all,

I'm reading an epub file using adobe digital 4.5. It's more or less
accessible but a problem I'm currently facing is to do with selecting
text in the book. My purpose is to highlight the text so I can get
back to it later for a reference. Is there a better way to do so?
Right now I'm not able to select the text so I can highlight, or
perhaps add notes which I haven't yet tried.

I've been reading Epub files on and off using this program, and have
just gone through the help file.

Hope someone figures out what I'm doing wrong.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Mayank