Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


John Isige
 

Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.


Sarah k Alawami
 

That seems odd, why do you have to relicence after every major windows update. If you don't see RC I think it's the one after maybe that's major. Or maybe you could google the build number?

Take care

On Oct 4, 2017, at 3:07 PM, John Isige <gwynn@tds.net> wrote:

Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.




Gene
 

I would think that only updates from one full version of Windows 10 to another would be major.  Most updates are security and stability updates.  I believe that Windows 10 has two major upgrades a year, such as from whatever was before it to the anniversary version.
 
Gene
----- original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 6:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?

That seems odd, why do you have to  relicence after every major windows update. If you don't see RC I think it's the one after maybe that's major. Or maybe you could google the build number?

Take care

> On Oct 4, 2017, at 3:07 PM, John Isige <gwynn@...> wrote:
>
> Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.
>
>
>
>





Sarah k Alawami
 

I'm a part of the insider program so for me every Tuesday and Friday are releases.. I guess you could do a google of the checksum and see what you come up with.

Take care and be blessed.

On Oct 4, 2017, at 4:31 PM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I would think that only updates from one full version of Windows 10 to another would be major.  Most updates are security and stability updates.  I believe that Windows 10 has two major upgrades a year, such as from whatever was before it to the anniversary version.
 
Gene
----- original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 6:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?

That seems odd, why do you have to  relicence after every major windows update. If you don't see RC I think it's the one after maybe that's major. Or maybe you could google the build number?

Take care

> On Oct 4, 2017, at 3:07 PM, John Isige <gwynn@...> wrote:
> 
> Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.
> 
> 
> 
> 






John Isige
 

So to answer the responses so far:

1. You have to license after every major update because Eloquence uses one of those licenses that's based on stuff about your computer, don't ask me what because I don't know. So a major OS upgrade, even within versions, can change things enough that if you just upgrade with your current license, that license will no longer work when the upgrade is done. Beyond that, you'll have to email Code Factory.

2. OK, two major upgrades a year, cool. That's sort of helpful, but it's missing the point a bit, I think. I know, for example, that there's a big creator's update coming out some time this month. What I don't know is when I'll get it, not only because I don't know when it's coming out, but also because of course you don't get updates as soon as they come out.

So suppose I get an update next week. Is that a simple security update? Is that the big one I need to unlicense for? That's what I'm trying to figure out a way to learn. I actually don't worry about the licensing for most of them because I know they're not major updates, but like I said, I got nailed by it in the past. So now I'm trying to figure out a way to find out when I'm looking at a major update, so it doesn't update automatically on me and make me lose another license.


 

My definition of a major feature update as opposed to a "regular" update is that a major update causes a change in Version number while all others change only the bulld number (a "big" regular) or the dot number on a current build number (a "small" regular).

I don't know of a simple way to differentiate between these three types other than keeping your ear to the ground regarding which KB numbers are for the major feature updates and paying attention to what's downloaded before restart.

If ever there were a reason, and a very good one, to complain to a vendor the inanity of forcing a relicensing of application software because the Windows 10 version, build, or build dot number changes is at the top of the list.  There is absolutely no reason for doing this and virtually no one does.  Why an assistive technology maker would do so is a complete mystery.

--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


 

Well you can always set  feature updates to about a year before they do what they do so you have time to do when you wish.

and if you know one is coming you can turn off updates for a month just remember that to  do that again waindows will have to get the latest update and install it else you won't be able to update or anything after a month or during it and your system will remain unable to install or update anything.

However if you need that extra breathing room then I'd do that.

For me on a win10 pro system, the update will officially come on a day where I don't want to.

I will probably set the feature updates to a year, or something which means I can do the update at a time of my choosing manually.

On 5/10/2017 11:07 a.m., John Isige wrote:
Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.



.


 

Well firstly you need to buy a windows pro licence if you only have home.

Then you can go to advanced update settings and set various options.

standard updates can be disabled for a month, and feature updates can be disabled for a year.

You can also turn off all updates for a month remembering that to do that again you will need to install updates or the latest update to get things working so for us pro users there are a lot of options.

On 5/10/2017 1:11 p.m., John Isige wrote:
So to answer the responses so far:

1. You have to license after every major update because Eloquence uses one of those licenses that's based on stuff about your computer, don't ask me what because I don't know. So a major OS upgrade, even within versions, can change things enough that if you just upgrade with your current license, that license will no longer work when the upgrade is done. Beyond that, you'll have to email Code Factory.

2. OK, two major upgrades a year, cool. That's sort of helpful, but it's missing the point a bit, I think. I know, for example, that there's a big creator's update coming out some time this month. What I don't know is when I'll get it, not only because I don't know when it's coming out, but also because of course you don't get updates as soon as they come out.

So suppose I get an update next week. Is that a simple security update? Is that the big one I need to unlicense for? That's what I'm trying to figure out a way to learn. I actually don't worry about the licensing for most of them because I know they're not major updates, but like I said, I got nailed by it in the past. So now I'm trying to figure out a way to find out when I'm looking at a major update, so it doesn't update automatically on me and make me lose another license.


.


 

Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no excuse, two years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any application software treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their feet to the fire.  This update delivery paradigm is not going away and for application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it mildly.

--
Brian  Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

     The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.  But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

            Niels Bohr

 

 


Austin Pinto <austinpinto.xaviers@...>
 

hi.
its easy to tell when a major update has arrived.
if you go to settings and then updates it will tell you something like
windows 10 build 16299 or so on.
if it says this its a major upgrade.
if it tells its a cumulative update then its a small one.
if you are a member of the windows10 forum on groups.io you will
always know when is the major update arriving there is a major update
arriving on 17th october and for some it has already arrived

On 10/5/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various
editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no excuse, two
years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any application software
treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their feet to
the fire.  This update delivery paradigm is not going away and for
application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it mildly.

--
Brian  - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot level on
request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

*     * *The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.* *  But
the opposite of a profound truth may well be another* * profound truth.*

*           ~ * *Niels Bohr*
--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3


 

Hi,
Usually the feature (major) update is shown as "Feature update to Windows 10, Version mmyy". Starting on October 17th, some folks will see an entry called "Feature update to Windows 10, Version 1709" as part of a list of updates.
An important thing to note: starting from the feature update coming out this month, individual updates will have their own installation progress messages.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Austin Pinto
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?

hi.
its easy to tell when a major update has arrived.
if you go to settings and then updates it will tell you something like windows 10 build 16299 or so on.
if it says this its a major upgrade.
if it tells its a cumulative update then its a small one.
if you are a member of the windows10 forum on groups.io you will always know when is the major update arriving there is a major update arriving on 17th october and for some it has already arrived

On 10/5/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various
editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no
excuse, two years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any
application software treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their feet
to the fire. This update delivery paradigm is not going away and for
application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it mildly.

--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot
level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

* * *The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.* *
But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another* * profound
truth.*

* ~ * *Niels Bohr*

--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3


Sarah k Alawami
 

Nice. Did I mis this? I'm a part of the insider I guess I'll find out in 2 weeks eh?

Take care and I do agree. Forcing you to relicense when a major update comes is not acceptable in my humble opinion.

On Oct 4, 2017, at 8:36 PM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,
Usually the feature (major) update is shown as "Feature update to Windows 10, Version my". Starting on October 17th, some folks will see an entry called "Feature update to Windows 10, Version 1709" as part of a list of updates.
An important thing to note: starting from the feature update coming out this month, individual updates will have their own installation progress messages.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Austin Pinto
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?

hi.
its easy to tell when a major update has arrived.
if you go to settings and then updates it will tell you something like windows 10 build 16299 or so on.
if it says this its a major upgrade.
if it tells its a cumulative update then its a small one.
if you are a member of the windows10 forum on groups.io you will always know when is the major update arriving there is a major update arriving on 17th october and for some it has already arrived

On 10/5/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various
editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no
excuse, two years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any
application software treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their feet
to the fire. This update delivery paradigm is not going away and for
application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it mildly.

--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot
level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

* * *The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.* *
But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another* * profound
truth.*

* ~ * *Niels Bohr*

--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3






 

Hi,
People in the Win10 Forum will be the first to know, as early as by midnight
my time.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sarah k
Alawami
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:51 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update
is a major upgrade?

Nice. Did I mis this? I'm a part of the insider I guess I'll find out in 2
weeks eh?

Take care and I do agree. Forcing you to relicense when a major update comes
is not acceptable in my humble opinion.

On Oct 4, 2017, at 8:36 PM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi,
Usually the feature (major) update is shown as "Feature update to Windows
10, Version my". Starting on October 17th, some folks will see an entry
called "Feature update to Windows 10, Version 1709" as part of a list of
updates.
An important thing to note: starting from the feature update coming out
this month, individual updates will have their own installation progress
messages.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Austin Pinto
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows
update is a major upgrade?

hi.
its easy to tell when a major update has arrived.
if you go to settings and then updates it will tell you something like
windows 10 build 16299 or so on.
if it says this its a major upgrade.
if it tells its a cumulative update then its a small one.
if you are a member of the windows10 forum on groups.io you will
always know when is the major update arriving there is a major update
arriving on 17th october and for some it has already arrived

On 10/5/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various
editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no
excuse, two years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any
application software treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their
feet to the fire. This update delivery paradigm is not going away
and for application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it
mildly.

--
Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063 (dot
level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

* * *The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.* *
But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another* * profound
truth.*

* ~ * *Niels Bohr*

--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@gmail.com
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3






Sarah k Alawami
 

Ah good. I guess i'll just pay attention when I receive my update probably on Friday, Tuesday, or when ever it gets to be released to me. I'm on the fast ring so it's almost every day I get something to test. Oh fun fun.

Take care

On Oct 4, 2017, at 8:53 PM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,
People in the Win10 Forum will be the first to know, as early as by midnight
my time.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sarah k
Alawami
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:51 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update
is a major upgrade?

Nice. Did I mis this? I'm a part of the insider I guess I'll find out in 2
weeks eh?

Take care and I do agree. Forcing you to relicense when a major update comes
is not acceptable in my humble opinion.

On Oct 4, 2017, at 8:36 PM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,
Usually the feature (major) update is shown as "Feature update to Windows
10, Version my". Starting on October 17th, some folks will see an entry
called "Feature update to Windows 10, Version 1709" as part of a list of
updates.
An important thing to note: starting from the feature update coming out
this month, individual updates will have their own installation progress
messages.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of 
Austin Pinto
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows
update is a major upgrade?

hi.
its easy to tell when a major update has arrived.
if you go to settings and then updates it will tell you something like
windows 10 build 16299 or so on.
if it says this its a major upgrade.
if it tells its a cumulative update then its a small one.
if you are a member of the windows10 forum on groups.io you will 
always know when is the major update arriving there is a major update 
arriving on 17th october and for some it has already arrived

On 10/5/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various 
editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no 
excuse, two years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any 
application software treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their 
feet to the fire.  This update delivery paradigm is not going away 
and for application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it
mildly.

--
Brian  - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot 
level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

*     * *The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.* *
But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another* * profound
truth.*

*           ~ * *Niels Bohr*



--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@...
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3














 

Hi,

If you are on fast ring, chances are that you might in fact be running what others will get starting on the 17th.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sarah k Alawami
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 10:09 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?

 

Ah good. I guess i'll just pay attention when I receive my update probably on Friday, Tuesday, or when ever it gets to be released to me. I'm on the fast ring so it's almost every day I get something to test. Oh fun fun.

 

Take care



On Oct 4, 2017, at 8:53 PM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

 

Hi,
People in the Win10 Forum will be the first to know, as early as by midnight
my time.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: 
nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Sarah k
Alawami
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:51 PM
To: 
nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update
is a major upgrade?

Nice. Did I mis this? I'm a part of the insider I guess I'll find out in 2
weeks eh?

Take care and I do agree. Forcing you to relicense when a major update comes
is not acceptable in my humble opinion.


On Oct 4, 2017, at 8:36 PM, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@...> wrote:

Hi,
Usually the feature (major) update is shown as "Feature update to Windows

10, Version my". Starting on October 17th, some folks will see an entry
called "Feature update to Windows 10, Version 1709" as part of a list of
updates.

An important thing to note: starting from the feature update coming out

this month, individual updates will have their own installation progress
messages.

Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of 
Austin Pinto
Sent: Wednesday, October 4, 2017 8:30 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows

update is a major upgrade?


hi.
its easy to tell when a major update has arrived.
if you go to settings and then updates it will tell you something like

windows 10 build 16299 or so on.

if it says this its a major upgrade.
if it tells its a cumulative update then its a small one.
if you are a member of the windows10 forum on groups.io you will 
always know when is the major update arriving there is a major update 
arriving on 17th october and for some it has already arrived

On 10/5/17, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Regardless of the gyrations one can or cannot take under the various 
editions of Windows 10 to defer updates, there is absolutely no 
excuse, two years plus into the Windows as a service era, for any 
application software treating Windows 10 updates as anything but routine.

The vendors who do not need to have their customers holding their 
feet to the fire.  This update delivery paradigm is not going away 
and for application software not to recognize it is outrageous, to put it

mildly.


--
Brian  - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1703, Build 15063  (dot 
level on request - it changes too often to keep in signature)

*     * *The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.* *
But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another* * profound
truth.*

*           ~ * *Niels Bohr*



--
search for me on facebook, google+, orkut..
austinpinto.xaviers@...
follow me on twitter.
austinmpinto
contact me on skype.
austin.pinto3












 


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

The problem here is that the creators fall update, spring in the southern hemisphere, is I think due on the 17th, and is basically a completely new windows. The updates in between tend to be just patches.
I'm sure that there is a hierarchical system to updates though.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Isige" <gwynn@tds.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 11:07 PM
Subject: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.



Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

The next according to Microsoft is on 17th of this month. Creators update fall edition.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@ripco.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, October 05, 2017 12:31 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


I would think that only updates from one full version of Windows 10 to another would be major. Most updates are security and stability updates. I believe that Windows 10 has two major upgrades a year, such as from whatever was before it to the anniversary version.

Gene
----- original Message -----

From: Sarah k Alawami
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 6:20 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


That seems odd, why do you have to relicence after every major windows update. If you don't see RC I think it's the one after maybe that's major. Or maybe you could google the build number?

Take care

On Oct 4, 2017, at 3:07 PM, John Isige <gwynn@tds.net> wrote:

Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.




Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I notice the way Dolphin do it is monitor your system and if anything is detected as a change it will still work but you have a set time to register merely by clicking on a link. It works well as obviously companies do know when a major update has occurred and it even works if I've had to change a piece of hardware, like the drive or memory. Quite how it does this I do not know, but it works.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Isige" <gwynn@tds.net>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, October 05, 2017 1:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


So to answer the responses so far:

1. You have to license after every major update because Eloquence uses one of those licenses that's based on stuff about your computer, don't ask me what because I don't know. So a major OS upgrade, even within versions, can change things enough that if you just upgrade with your current license, that license will no longer work when the upgrade is done. Beyond that, you'll have to email Code Factory.

2. OK, two major upgrades a year, cool. That's sort of helpful, but it's missing the point a bit, I think. I know, for example, that there's a big creator's update coming out some time this month. What I don't know is when I'll get it, not only because I don't know when it's coming out, but also because of course you don't get updates as soon as they come out.

So suppose I get an update next week. Is that a simple security update? Is that the big one I need to unlicense for? That's what I'm trying to figure out a way to learn. I actually don't worry about the licensing for most of them because I know they're not major updates, but like I said, I got nailed by it in the past. So now I'm trying to figure out a way to find out when I'm looking at a major update, so it doesn't update automatically on me and make me lose another license.


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

You are allowed to go back also for a few days. It normally mangles some software if my previous experience is anything to go by, so I generally back those up first!
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, October 05, 2017 2:55 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


Well you can always set feature updates to about a year before they do what they do so you have time to do when you wish.

and if you know one is coming you can turn off updates for a month just remember that to do that again waindows will have to get the latest update and install it else you won't be able to update or anything after a month or during it and your system will remain unable to install or update anything.

However if you need that extra breathing room then I'd do that.

For me on a win10 pro system, the update will officially come on a day where I don't want to.

I will probably set the feature updates to a year, or something which means I can do the update at a time of my choosing manually.




On 5/10/2017 11:07 a.m., John Isige wrote:
Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.



.


Sarah k Alawami
 

I've ben running the builds since I think July. You will love what you see actually. It is fast and very very stable. This is on a production machine.

Take care

On Oct 5, 2017, at 2:19 AM, Brian's Mail list account via Groups.Io <bglists@...> wrote:

You are allowed to go back also for a few days. It normally mangles some software if my previous experience is anything to go by, so I generally back those up first!
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, October 05, 2017 2:55 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Slightly OT: Is there a way to tell if a Windows update is a major upgrade?


Well you can always set feature updates to about a year before they do what they do so you have time to do when you wish.

and if you know one is coming you can turn off updates for a month just remember that to do that again waindows will have to get the latest update and install it else you won't be able to update or anything after a month or during it and your system will remain unable to install or update anything.

However if you need that extra breathing room then I'd do that.

For me on a win10 pro system, the update will officially come on a day where I don't want to.

I will probably set the feature updates to a year, or something which means I can do the update at a time of my choosing manually.




On 5/10/2017 11:07 a.m., John Isige wrote:
Hi all. The recent posts about Win 10 made me think of this. I'm running Code Factory Eloquence. They say for major upgrades you should unlicense it and relicense after the upgrade's done, and I actually had to contact them about this for one of the major updates, anniversary or creator's. Is there some way to tell if an update is major? Mostly I see updates when I shut down, "update and shut down" pops up. It would be nice not to have to stop and go unlicense for every update.



.