Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a web browser?


Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 

I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone


Domingos de Oliveira <domingos20000@...>
 

Adobe Reader will tag the document automatically. When you start the programm first time, it will recognize that you are using assistive technology. You will then have to configure the Auto tagging function. When you open a document, the reader will insert the tags. After a few mintues, depends on the size of the document you can start to read. This procedure is not necessary for accessible or taged documents, but these docs are very rare.


Am 01.11.2017 um 15:31 schrieb Mary Otten:

I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone
--
Domingos de Oliveira
Accessibility-Consultant/Online-Redaktion
Karthäuserstr. 13
53129 Bonn
Tel: 0176 322 45 129
Mail: domingos20000@googlemail.com
Web: www.oliveira-online.net


Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 

So you are referring to the acrobat DC reader? I guess there is only one reader now? Just wanting to make sure I don’t get anything more complex then I need to have.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 1, 2017, at 8:03 AM, Domingos de Oliveira via Groups.Io <domingos20000=googlemail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Adobe Reader will tag the document automatically. When you start the programm first time, it will recognize that you are using assistive technology. You will then have to configure the Auto tagging function. When you open a document, the reader will insert the tags. After a few mintues, depends on the size of the document you can start to read. This procedure is not necessary for accessible or taged documents, but these docs are very rare.


Am 01.11.2017 um 15:31 schrieb Mary Otten:
I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone
--
Domingos de Oliveira
Accessibility-Consultant/Online-Redaktion
Karthäuserstr. 13
53129 Bonn
Tel: 0176 322 45 129
Mail: domingos20000@googlemail.com
Web: www.oliveira-online.net




Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Horses for courses really. Adobe reader DC is OK as long as the writer of the file has flagged changes in reading order, but I'm sure you are aware of the problems with picture pdfs and those who run columns together and all of that.
you might also like the pdf reader on the Webbie site, which still works on 7 and 10, and is good for those files which are pure text as its a lot less messy to use.

I cannot speak for in browser solutions, None of the ones I've used seem to work very well.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Mary Otten" <motten53@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 2:31 PM
Subject: [nvda] Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a web browser?


I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Hi.

I use qRead, as someone else mentioned below. It is not free but works with PDFs, epubs and a couple of other formats, and I like it because it loads them really, really fast, even if they are large, which isn't really the case with Adobe. I also have Adobe pro on this machine and I really like it; the oCR feature is great. Again though, it's slow as can be, even on my new Windows 10 machine, so not always a nice solution.

I tested Adobe Acrobat DC on a work machine running Windows 10 and it works pretty well with JAWS, at least. I can't speak for its funcationality with nVDA (which I myself just started using), and there's the caveat about speed I mentioned earlier, which never seems something Adobe has been interested in improving upon.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mary Otten
Sent: November 1, 2017 10:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a web browser?

I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone


Mário Navarro
 

Hi Mary.
Welcome to windows 10.
Yes, any one of the alternatives work well on windows 10.
almost all work well at the moment.

PDF-reading experience on windows with NVDA and JAWS, is completely different than in mac os.
Yes dear Mary, you know as well as I, the misery that is the PDF accessibility support in mac os.
Welcome to a much better reading experience of PDF in windows!
cheers.


Às 14:31 de 01/11/2017, Mary Otten escreveu:

I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.
Mary


Sent from my iPhone

.


Giles Turnbull
 

I had not heard of QRead before so went to their website to check it out. I downloaded the demo version and within 5 mins had returned to the website to purchase the full version! I think it's fantastic! I use a HIMS Blaze ET book reader and one thing that does annoy me is that Bookshare books cannot be navigated word by word or character by character which, if you want to know how a word is spelled is troublesome. When I read a html webpage, such as a newspaper, there is the word and character navigation, but apparently not in Daisy format books.

The QRead program will open Daisy books from Bookshare right from the zipped download, and I can navigate by word or character as I desire. Although Bookshare books can be read online, having to press the next page button at the end of a page gets a little tiring in a few hundred page book!

I tried QRead out on a PDF file too and can confirm it does open the PDF very quickly and is far simpler to navigate than using Acrobat DC. With PDF files I always either save them as text from Acrobat, or OCR them using Abbyy Finereader because I find that the best way to turn a PDF into a plain text file.

I'll be using QRead as my first port of call for PDFs and Daisy reading, and several other formats it handles :)


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Yes, it’s a neat product and I was pretty quick to buy it, too. Sometimes the mainstream applications are just not the most convenient to use. Glad you like it.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: November 2, 2017 11:49 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a web browser?

 

I had not heard of QRead before so went to their website to check it out. I downloaded the demo version and within 5 mins had returned to the website to purchase the full version! I think it's fantastic! I use a HIMS Blaze ET book reader and one thing that does annoy me is that Bookshare books cannot be navigated word by word or character by character which, if you want to know how a word is spelled is troublesome. When I read a html webpage, such as a newspaper, there is the word and character navigation, but apparently not in Daisy format books.

The QRead program will open Daisy books from Bookshare right from the zipped download, and I can navigate by word or character as I desire. Although Bookshare books can be read online, having to press the next page button at the end of a page gets a little tiring in a few hundred page book!

I tried QRead out on a PDF file too and can confirm it does open the PDF very quickly and is far simpler to navigate than using Acrobat DC. With PDF files I always either save them as text from Acrobat, or OCR them using Abbyy Finereader because I find that the best way to turn a PDF into a plain text file.

I'll be using QRead as my first port of call for PDFs and Daisy reading, and several other formats it handles :)


Michal Rada
 

Hi all, I am using Balabolka for reading EPUB and PDF files, and it works perfectly for me.

M


Dne 2.11.2017 v 16:48 Giles Turnbull napsal(a):

I had not heard of QRead before so went to their website to check it out. I downloaded the demo version and within 5 mins had returned to the website to purchase the full version! I think it's fantastic! I use a HIMS Blaze ET book reader and one thing that does annoy me is that Bookshare books cannot be navigated word by word or character by character which, if you want to know how a word is spelled is troublesome. When I read a html webpage, such as a newspaper, there is the word and character navigation, but apparently not in Daisy format books.

The QRead program will open Daisy books from Bookshare right from the zipped download, and I can navigate by word or character as I desire. Although Bookshare books can be read online, having to press the next page button at the end of a page gets a little tiring in a few hundred page book!

I tried QRead out on a PDF file too and can confirm it does open the PDF very quickly and is far simpler to navigate than using Acrobat DC. With PDF files I always either save them as text from Acrobat, or OCR them using Abbyy Finereader because I find that the best way to turn a PDF into a plain text file.

I'll be using QRead as my first port of call for PDFs and Daisy reading, and several other formats it handles :)