Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a webbrowser?


David Griffith
 

Personally I use  QRead for PDFs but this is not free.

As an experiment I took a Powerpoint presentation  which somebody had sent to me today  and converted it to a PDF.

I then opened it  from File Explorer in Edge with NVDA.

To a basic extent it worked very well and everything appeared to be read easily and normally in  Edge,. Certainly I could read through with line by line or  or paragraph just listen to the whole document with a say all command/ This  at least appears to be better than the say all interruption bug causing problems on the Mac at the moment.

The main downside is that although NVDA detected and announced the existence  of Headings n this document it did not navigate to them in my case with the use of the H heading command.

However as I say this was not a normal PDF so I would have to experiment further with this to see if it is a general problem.

However it seems that Edge is at least as good as if not better than the free text based PDF options like the Webbie Reader.

 

In terms of reading Tables  in PDFs Ihave in the past got around this by using Abbey Finereader which has seemed one of the best programs for detecting tables with a scan. I normally just read the tables then using Microsoft Word or save to Html to read in a browser.

However it may be that Acrobat support for screen reading access to tables has improved. I would have to hunt down a PDF with tables to check this out.

 

David Griffith

 

 

 

and.

 

My Blind Access and Guide dog Blog
http://dgriffithblog.wordpress.com/
My Blind hammer Blog
https://www.westhamtillidie.com/authors/blind-hammer/posts

 

From: Mary Otten
Sent: 01 November 2017 15:18
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a webbrowser?

 

So you are referring to the acrobat DC reader? I guess there is only one reader now? Just wanting to make sure I don’t get anything more complex then I need to have.

Mary

 

 

Sent from my iPhone

 

> On Nov 1, 2017, at 8:03 AM, Domingos de Oliveira via Groups.Io <domingos20000@...> wrote:

>

> Adobe Reader will tag the document automatically. When you start the programm first time, it will recognize that you are using assistive technology. You will then have to configure the Auto tagging function. When you open a document, the reader will insert the tags. After a few mintues, depends on the size of the document you can start to read. This procedure is not necessary for accessible or taged documents, but these docs are very rare.

>

>

>> Am 01.11.2017 um 15:31 schrieb Mary Otten:

>> I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.

>> Mary

>>

>>

>> Sent from my iPhone

>>

>

> --

> Domingos de Oliveira

> Accessibility-Consultant/Online-Redaktion

> Karthäuserstr. 13

> 53129 Bonn

> Tel: 0176 322 45 129

> Mail: domingos20000@...

> Web: www.oliveira-online.net

>

>

>

>

 

 

 


Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 

I have no problem paying for programs when they do what I need them to do. Free is nice, but it’s not always the best.


Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 1, 2017, at 9:56 AM, David Griffith <daj.griffith@...> wrote:

Personally I use  QRead for PDFs but this is not free.

As an experiment I took a Powerpoint presentation  which somebody had sent to me today  and converted it to a PDF.

I then opened it  from File Explorer in Edge with NVDA.

To a basic extent it worked very well and everything appeared to be read easily and normally in  Edge,. Certainly I could read through with line by line or  or paragraph just listen to the whole document with a say all command/ This  at least appears to be better than the say all interruption bug causing problems on the Mac at the moment.

The main downside is that although NVDA detected and announced the existence  of Headings n this document it did not navigate to them in my case with the use of the H heading command.

However as I say this was not a normal PDF so I would have to experiment further with this to see if it is a general problem.

However it seems that Edge is at least as good as if not better than the free text based PDF options like the Webbie Reader.

 

In terms of reading Tables  in PDFs Ihave in the past got around this by using Abbey Finereader which has seemed one of the best programs for detecting tables with a scan. I normally just read the tables then using Microsoft Word or save to Html to read in a browser.

However it may be that Acrobat support for screen reading access to tables has improved. I would have to hunt down a PDF with tables to check this out.

 

David Griffith

 

 

 

and.

 

My Blind Access and Guide dog Blog
http://dgriffithblog.wordpress.com/
My Blind hammer Blog
https://www.westhamtillidie.com/authors/blind-hammer/posts

 

From: Mary Otten
Sent: 01 November 2017 15:18
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a webbrowser?

 

So you are referring to the acrobat DC reader? I guess there is only one reader now? Just wanting to make sure I don’t get anything more complex then I need to have.

Mary

 

 

Sent from my iPhone

 

> On Nov 1, 2017, at 8:03 AM, Domingos de Oliveira via Groups.Io <domingos20000@...> wrote:

>

> Adobe Reader will tag the document automatically. When you start the programm first time, it will recognize that you are using assistive technology. You will then have to configure the Auto tagging function. When you open a document, the reader will insert the tags. After a few mintues, depends on the size of the document you can start to read. This procedure is not necessary for accessible or taged documents, but these docs are very rare.

>

>

>> Am 01.11.2017 um 15:31 schrieb Mary Otten:

>> I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.

>> Mary

>>

>>

>> Sent from my iPhone

>>

>

> --

> Domingos de Oliveira

> Accessibility-Consultant/Online-Redaktion

> Karthäuserstr. 13

> 53129 Bonn

> Tel: 0176 322 45 129

> Mail: domingos20000@...

> Web: www.oliveira-online.net

>

>

>

>

 

 

 


Mary Otten <motten53@...>
 



 hi David,
Well, all I know is that on my old windows XP machine with an old version of Acrobat reader, if I come across a table, using the window ice cream eater, OK never mind, I could manage the table. I know NVDA has the ability to manage tables. So I’m surprised that adobe doesn’t do a better job for you. I wonder what this acrobat pro thing is with its OCR. I have a OCR program Kurzweil 1000, and it has worked well for me in the past, but I haven’t used it for reading things already had the text available. It just seems like this should not be a big deal in 2017. For heaven sake‘s.
Mary
Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 1, 2017, at 9:56 AM, David Griffith <daj.griffith@...> wrote:

Personally I use  QRead for PDFs but this is not free.

As an experiment I took a Powerpoint presentation  which somebody had sent to me today  and converted it to a PDF.

I then opened it  from File Explorer in Edge with NVDA.

To a basic extent it worked very well and everything appeared to be read easily and normally in  Edge,. Certainly I could read through with line by line or  or paragraph just listen to the whole document with a say all command/ This  at least appears to be better than the say all interruption bug causing problems on the Mac at the moment.

The main downside is that although NVDA detected and announced the existence  of Headings n this document it did not navigate to them in my case with the use of the H heading command.

However as I say this was not a normal PDF so I would have to experiment further with this to see if it is a general problem.

However it seems that Edge is at least as good as if not better than the free text based PDF options like the Webbie Reader.

 

In terms of reading Tables  in PDFs Ihave in the past got around this by using Abbey Finereader which has seemed one of the best programs for detecting tables with a scan. I normally just read the tables then using Microsoft Word or save to Html to read in a browser.

However it may be that Acrobat support for screen reading access to tables has improved. I would have to hunt down a PDF with tables to check this out.

 

David Griffith

 

 

 

and.

 

My Blind Access and Guide dog Blog
http://dgriffithblog.wordpress.com/
My Blind hammer Blog
https://www.westhamtillidie.com/authors/blind-hammer/posts

 

From: Mary Otten
Sent: 01 November 2017 15:18
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Reading PDF files with NVDA using acrobat? Or a webbrowser?

 

So you are referring to the acrobat DC reader? I guess there is only one reader now? Just wanting to make sure I don’t get anything more complex then I need to have.

Mary

 

 

Sent from my iPhone

 

> On Nov 1, 2017, at 8:03 AM, Domingos de Oliveira via Groups.Io <domingos20000@...> wrote:

>

> Adobe Reader will tag the document automatically. When you start the programm first time, it will recognize that you are using assistive technology. You will then have to configure the Auto tagging function. When you open a document, the reader will insert the tags. After a few mintues, depends on the size of the document you can start to read. This procedure is not necessary for accessible or taged documents, but these docs are very rare.

>

>

>> Am 01.11.2017 um 15:31 schrieb Mary Otten:

>> I am coming from an old windows XP machine where I used an old version of Adobe acrobat with good success on many PDF files. It let me navigate tables, access links, read continuously if I wanted to, page through the document, etc. i’m going to get a new Windows 10 machine, and I’m going to put NVDA on it and of course it will have narrator. I want to know which method work the best for reading PDF files. I understand they will open in edge if you want. And I assume the Adobe DC acrobat reader or whatever it’s called is also accessible. I gather the older readers are no longer supported. Anyway, I’m looking for something that will give me the best possible experience with the least possible hassle.

>> Mary

>>

>>

>> Sent from my iPhone

>>

>

> --

> Domingos de Oliveira

> Accessibility-Consultant/Online-Redaktion

> Karthäuserstr. 13

> 53129 Bonn

> Tel: 0176 322 45 129

> Mail: domingos20000@...

> Web: www.oliveira-online.net

>

>

>

>