Topics

Setting Up New All-In-One Computer with Win10, Acer Brand


David Russell
 

Hello Group,

In an effort to be concise: Can someone recommend a website be it
afb.org, Entopia, or some such, that provides sighted and blind users
alike a step-by-step guide on setting up a new computer with Windows,
MS Word, and NVDA?

Alongside this, per the recent digest noting the synthesizer issue
with Google Docs, can you please recommend an NVDA version, perhaps
not the most latest, that will work with FireFox, Win10, and Google
Docs, subverting the discussed synthesizer issue?

On the computer purchased, I am told Windows 10 needs to be
downloaded, as does MS Word, but the appropriate software is provided
to download all necessary. Thanks in advance!
And, my wife will appreciate this task being made easier!

Holiday Sentiments,
--
David Russell
david.sonofhashem@gmail.com


 

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019 at 10:48 AM, David Russell wrote:
I am told Windows 10 needs to be
downloaded,
My only comment with regard to Windows 10 needing to be downloaded is, "Not likely on a brand new computer."   Unless you bought something that's been sitting on the shelf for a very long time I haven't seen a PC ship with other than Windows 10 on it (other than by special order) for about 3 years now, at least.

If the machine did not come with MS-Office preinstalled then you will have to acquire a license key for the edition of Office you want then go to setup.office.com to initiate the download and install process.  It's quite straightforward.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


 

There is no definitive end user guide for your all in 1.

Firstly you will need to navigate a website the  acer site with your model and serial, to get all the driver and programs you want.

You will then have to download the windows media creation tool, run it, follow the instructions to make a bootable usb stick.

After that you need to incert it, turn off the system, hit f8, turn it on while holding such, select the usb device to boot it.

Use control win enter and make sure scan mode is not set.

then open a command prompt

do a list disk

then select disk 0

then type clean

then y

then select disk 1 if you have another drive and select clean

then exit

go to setup select the drive with the free space usually the smaller one usually the one thats not 1tb in size out of scan mode hit create then next, you can also put a new partition on disk 1 if you want, but we can do it later.

Then follow instructions to install windows.

After windows starts you need to set your network, and update things, then go through all the settings page by page and configure them how you want then install all the drivers how you want via their wizzards and configure them how you want.

After all that the system will work and you can create your secondary partition in disk manager which is in admin tools in control panel and then computer management and then storage, then select the empty drive right click it with the app key and create a drive then you can format it from there or my computer then use it.

You should configure windows update and everything else to your liking and go and configure speech and option features to your liking to as well as privacy and security pages.

After that windows is set up.

I've basically missed a few steps but thats basically a from scratch clean clear and burn of a new system.

Its a darn lot to do and you probably will want someone that does it as a job to set it, I mean there are shortcuts but whatever.

As for office, any office from xp-2010 will need to be installed normally the installs are easy enough to do, set name key formatting, etc the way you want it.

In office 2013 and up updates are controled via alt f d r and space in office itself.

Compatability packs will not work with office versions over 2010 either.

So there is a really rough guide

Now if you can wait and am really patient, I will be going through a servicing contract for 2 business systems as well as a potential eventual entry level business system upgrade for a new client from win7 to 10 but having windows 10 on a new system completely.

I will be able to guide as best as I can the user through a setup of windows itself, and try to do settings and the like.

I will also go through the setup of libre office.

Its not microsoft office but the basic setup for most of this stuff is the same.

Microsoft office is online for most of it from 2013 up so it may be slightly different and configuration to, but most of it will be standard.

For me, its easier for me to just do, and just go and its done.

It will be a challenge for me to speak what I am doing before I do it, and my pitfalls on things to.

However you will have to wait for that guide, I realise you probably can't wait that long.

On 21/12/2019 4:48 am, David Russell wrote:
Hello Group,

In an effort to be concise: Can someone recommend a website be it
afb.org, Entopia, or some such, that provides sighted and blind users
alike a step-by-step guide on setting up a new computer with Windows,
MS Word, and NVDA?

Alongside this, per the recent digest noting the synthesizer issue
with Google Docs, can you please recommend an NVDA version, perhaps
not the most latest, that will work with FireFox, Win10, and Google
Docs, subverting the discussed synthesizer issue?

On the computer purchased, I am told Windows 10 needs to be
downloaded, as does MS Word, but the appropriate software is provided
to download all necessary. Thanks in advance!
And, my wife will appreciate this task being made easier!

Holiday Sentiments,


David Russell
 

Hello NVDA Members,

I first want to express thanks to NV Everiss for taking the time to
send me an admittedly rough guide to ensure windows 10 gets installed
on my newly purchased all-in-one computer.

I have a couple concerns that relate to this topic and NVDA that may
also be of concern to others in a similar situation:
"I found a 2016 article at Accessibility Central, discouraging then
the download of windows 2010 and reasons given. Since this comes with
the Narrator Screen Reader, am I obligated to use it for setting up
windows on any computer as a blind person?

- Since Narrator is the built-in screen reading program, will the
installation of Win10 work if I follow the steps from
support.microsoft.com

According to them one can install windows by using Narrator.

Note: I did purchase a product key for MS Office, and though yet to
open the box, assume a product key comes with the windows 10 on this
Acer PC.

- If I have to do much more to ensure proper install of windows and MS
Office, than finding an outside vendor may be wise.

- The final issue is if I want NVDA, can I uninstall Narrator and make
NVDA the primary screen reader, once all is installed?

Thanks once again!
Sincerely,
--
David Russell
david.sonofhashem@gmail.com


 

On Fri, Dec 20, 2019 at 02:49 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
Firstly you will need to navigate a website the  acer site with your model and serial, to get all the driver and programs you want.

You will then have to download the windows media creation tool, run it, follow the instructions to make a bootable usb stick.
The style of computer has little to no bearing on the vast majority of setup of Windows 10.

If this is a brand new computer with Windows 10 shipped with it there is no reason to need to go to the Acer support pages for drivers as the manufacturer drivers will already be installed.  One very seldom needs to do this at all these days, as most OEMs have gotten much better about supplying Microsoft with their drivers for inclusion in The Great Microsoft Driver Library in the Cloud that's used by Win10 to get drivers.  There is a rare exception, but I never go to get drivers in advance anymore.  If you have a non-functional or flaky device, then you can go to get the OEM driver if needed.

It is generally a bad idea to take a brand new machine with Windows 10 installed by the OEM and do a completely clean Windows 10 reinstall "just because."  There are rare times where that may need to be done, but it's just as easy to remove bloatware that might come with the machine, or just ignore it, than it is to do a completely clean reinstall on a machine with an already fresh Windows 10 instance running on it.  If the instance is stale from sitting on the shelf, well, Windows Update will take care of that in short order.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


 

As a separate note, I would like anyone who wishes to extend this conversation further to take it to the NVDA Chat Subgroup and/or consider asking on the Windows 10 for Screen Reader Users group.  It's really not about NVDA in any meaningful way, as there's nothing distinctive about installing NVDA on Windows 10 versus 8.1 or 7.  You simply fetch the installer for the version you wish to install and run it.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


 

Well, the licence will be tied to your bios.

You will probably want to set the system up and refresh it/reformat immediately because of the amount of bloat on it.

You can use fresh start for this but I forget where it is.

If you got office there is a key, most installs are the same and yeah they work.

Narator has come a long way since 2016.

You can start and stop it and you can run nvda with it to if you want you don't need to and you can't uninstall it.

I sometimes run nvda and narator together because narator scan can be usefull.

You can set up windows with narator and to some extent use narator, nvda will work with a lot more apps but if you read your article from 2016 well  its old.

As for office it depends on the version as I said.

Basically you will need to adjust background apps to not load everything bar windows security, and you will also want to adjust your privacy and security settings to what you want and a few other things.

If you are not wanting to reformat just yet, removing unwanted stuff is fine.

The issue I have found with all the systems that have come preconfigured mainly my hp boxes is that windows came with several recovery partitions, including but not limited to, recovery bios and diagnostic partitions and important recovery and oem partitions.

The point being that you may reach a point where windows will not be able to install feature updates due to the fact there is no more space to create a recovery partition and set extra stuff up.

There is a probable way round that but the way I have done it is to clear out all the drives, by cleaning all partitions except with thehard drive if its a secondary where I can clear the secondary partition off it and then well expand the volume.

With windows and your drivers downloadable from the net you won't need to have the spaciffic configurations needed anyway.

If you are going the new user rout, you probably will have a lot of trials like mcafee  and other stuff about.

The easiest way is to download all the drivers or get someone to do it, and then clear off the entire computer then recreate all partitions, then and only then install windows or well you can do that yourself.

After doing this to all systems I have had no issue with them not wanting to install updates for features at all.

I have always tried to custom build things myself but saying that I have never had shop brought shop branded things so maybe I can control things.

On 22/12/2019 7:30 am, David Russell wrote:
Hello NVDA Members,

I first want to express thanks to NV Everiss for taking the time to
send me an admittedly rough guide to ensure windows 10 gets installed
on my newly purchased all-in-one computer.

I have a couple concerns that relate to this topic and NVDA that may
also be of concern to others in a similar situation:
"I found a 2016 article at Accessibility Central, discouraging then
the download of windows 2010 and reasons given. Since this comes with
the Narrator Screen Reader, am I obligated to use it for setting up
windows on any computer as a blind person?

- Since Narrator is the built-in screen reading program, will the
installation of Win10 work if I follow the steps from
support.microsoft.com

According to them one can install windows by using Narrator.

Note: I did purchase a product key for MS Office, and though yet to
open the box, assume a product key comes with the windows 10 on this
Acer PC.

- If I have to do much more to ensure proper install of windows and MS
Office, than finding an outside vendor may be wise.

- The final issue is if I want NVDA, can I uninstall Narrator and make
NVDA the primary screen reader, once all is installed?

Thanks once again!
Sincerely,


Arlene
 

Hi there: Can you use Narator for your main screen reader? Someone did ask me if you can. I did tell this person I’m not sure if you can.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Shaun Everiss
Sent: December 21, 2019 8:32 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Setting Up New All-In-One Computer with Win10, Acer Brand

 

Well, the licence will be tied to your bios.

 

You will probably want to set the system up and refresh it/reformat

immediately because of the amount of bloat on it.

 

You can use fresh start for this but I forget where it is.

 

If you got office there is a key, most installs are the same and yeah

they work.

 

Narator has come a long way since 2016.

 

You can start and stop it and you can run nvda with it to if you want

you don't need to and you can't uninstall it.

 

I sometimes run nvda and narator together because narator scan can be

usefull.

 

You can set up windows with narator and to some extent use narator, nvda

will work with a lot more apps but if you read your article from 2016

well  its old.

 

As for office it depends on the version as I said.

 

Basically you will need to adjust background apps to not load everything

bar windows security, and you will also want to adjust your privacy and

security settings to what you want and a few other things.

 

If you are not wanting to reformat just yet, removing unwanted stuff is

fine.

 

The issue I have found with all the systems that have come preconfigured

mainly my hp boxes is that windows came with several recovery

partitions, including but not limited to, recovery bios and diagnostic

partitions and important recovery and oem partitions.

 

The point being that you may reach a point where windows will not be

able to install feature updates due to the fact there is no more space

to create a recovery partition and set extra stuff up.

 

There is a probable way round that but the way I have done it is to

clear out all the drives, by cleaning all partitions except with thehard

drive if its a secondary where I can clear the secondary partition off

it and then well expand the volume.

 

With windows and your drivers downloadable from the net you won't need

to have the spaciffic configurations needed anyway.

 

If you are going the new user rout, you probably will have a lot of

trials like mcafee  and other stuff about.

 

The easiest way is to download all the drivers or get someone to do it,

and then clear off the entire computer then recreate all partitions,

then and only then install windows or well you can do that yourself.

 

After doing this to all systems I have had no issue with them not

wanting to install updates for features at all.

 

I have always tried to custom build things myself but saying that I have

never had shop brought shop branded things so maybe I can control things.

 

 

 

 

On 22/12/2019 7:30 am, David Russell wrote:

> Hello NVDA Members,

> I first want to express thanks to NV Everiss for taking the time to

> send me an admittedly rough guide to ensure windows 10 gets installed

> on my newly purchased all-in-one computer.

> I have a couple concerns that relate to this topic and NVDA that may

> also be of concern to others in a similar situation:

> "I found a 2016 article at Accessibility Central, discouraging then

> the download of windows 2010 and reasons given. Since this comes with

> the Narrator Screen Reader, am I obligated to use it for setting up

> windows on any computer as a blind person?

> - Since Narrator is the built-in screen reading program, will the

> installation of Win10 work if I follow the steps from

> support.microsoft.com

> According to them one can install windows by using Narrator.

> Note: I did purchase a product key for MS Office, and though yet to

> open the box, assume a product key comes with the windows 10 on this

> Acer PC.

> - If I have to do much more to ensure proper install of windows and MS

> Office, than finding an outside vendor may be wise.

> - The final issue is if I want NVDA, can I uninstall Narrator and make

> NVDA the primary screen reader, once all is installed?

> Thanks once again!

> Sincerely,