Topics

NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?


licurici.stelistii@...
 

Hello. Is there any way that I can make NVDA read the subtitles from movies? Is there a video player that I can use? I'm on Windows 7. Thanks


Rob Hudson
 

licurici.stelistii via Groups.Io <licurici.stelistii=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Is there any way that I can make NVDA read the subtitles from movies? Is there a video player that I can use? I'm on Windows 7. Thanks
If the subtitle is a bitmap, i.e a picture, no way. There is theoretically a way in vlc to see them, if they are actual text pieces scrolling on the screen, but i Haven't found a way.


 

Personally, I'd actually go for a dubbed version, if we're talking foreign film.  Although I'd rather avoid dubbed versions, the idea of simultaneous reading of subtitles over top of the actual dialog would be maddening.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


Rob Hudson
 

Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
Personally, I'd actually go for a dubbed version, if we're talking foreign film. Although I'd rather avoid dubbed versions, the idea of simultaneous reading of subtitles over top of the actual dialog would be maddening.
Ideally you'd want to read the subs on a braille display. But again, if the subs are a bitmap, no can do. Subs are a mess to OCR, also.


 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 11:47 AM, Rob Hudson wrote:
Ideally you'd want to read the subs on a braille display.
This would be ideal, but not what I'd thought of when the phrase "read subtitles" was used.  It makes perfect sense, but never would have occurred to me since I can see.

I would also be curious as to what the exact need is, not because it's any of my business, but because there are other possible solutions.  I have high frequency hearing loss and recently started wearing hearing aids which have bluetooth capability.  I am able to have sound from my computer piped directly to my aids, which allows me to hear all sorts of things that I could not hear when having to listen through laptop speakers.  For years I used closed captions (and they're still on) for television but I don't need to read them nearly as much as I once did if I'm wearing my hearing aids when watching.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


Rob Hudson
 

Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
I would also be curious as to what the exact need is, not because it's any of my business, but because there are other possible solutions.
Well, I found it useful for example because, until recently, I could not hear speech very well at all. My speech comprehension was below forty percent. A cochlear implant fixed that, and then I went bilateral. But sometimes background noise still drowns out what is being said. Enter subtitles.


 

Rob,

        I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

        I understand what you're trying to solve, but I don't think that adding "a third layer" that's also presented auditorily will actually do that.  I guess it can't hurt to try, if it's possible, but I suspect a "making it worse, not better" outcome.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


ely.r@...
 

Rob, as of now, I don't think any screen reader can read subtitles. If those
titles originated with the actual film, for all purposes they are just
images, not real text to be spoken. If the titles are broadcast added them
to are not accessible. The suggestion of finding an English audio described
version of the film is your best bet. Start by searching on the ACB Audio
Description Project at:
https://www.acb.org/adp/

Let us know what you find. You might also want to post that question to the
ADP [project list. The add your name to the list is on the site.
Luck,
Rick, a blind film teacher

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob Hudson
Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 11:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

licurici.stelistii via Groups.Io <licurici.stelistii=yahoo.com@groups.io>
wrote:
Is there any way that I can make NVDA read the subtitles from movies?
Is there a video player that I can use? I'm on Windows 7. Thanks
If the subtitle is a bitmap, i.e a picture, no way. There is theoretically a
way in vlc to see them, if they are actual text pieces scrolling on the
screen, but i Haven't found a way.


Rob Hudson
 

Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.
And that's why I said braille display. That's how I used to read them.


Rob Hudson
 

ely.r@... wrote:
Rob, as of now, I don't think any screen reader can read subtitles. If those
titles originated with the actual film, for all purposes they are just
images, not real text to be spoken.
Well, that's not always true. Some film disks have actual text subtitles you can copy. I won't get into how, but it's possible. And others, as you say, are just images. There is no standard.


Gene
 

I suppose you could turn off the sound of the film and just read the subtitles.  But if you are going to do that, you might do much better, in terms of accessibility, to see if the script of the movie is available.  There are some sites that are completely useless such as Scriptorama, (spelling) because the person goes through all the trouble of transcribing script after script, and doesn't include any information such as who is speaking and the setting.  There are other sites that have full scripts, but you will get earlier drafts on some sites, not the final scripts and there may be important differences.  So be careful what the site tells you about the script.
 
Actually, as I think about it, it might be cumbersome, but using a script from Scriptorama, maybe you could use it to find passages that are unintelligible in the film and read them while stopping the film, then returning to the film.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 12:19 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

Rob,

        I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

        I understand what you're trying to solve, but I don't think that adding "a third layer" that's also presented auditorily will actually do that.  I guess it can't hurt to try, if it's possible, but I suspect a "making it worse, not better" outcome.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


Oriana
 

For various reasons, the subtitles for many English and foreign films are available at https://www.opensubtitles.org . Keep in mind that the subtitle standard is to record the speaker name for every line, but many publicly contributed subtitles simply don't. Timing can also be extremely frustrating.


On Sun, Jan 12, 2020, 3:03 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
I suppose you could turn off the sound of the film and just read the subtitles.  But if you are going to do that, you might do much better, in terms of accessibility, to see if the script of the movie is available.  There are some sites that are completely useless such as Scriptorama, (spelling) because the person goes through all the trouble of transcribing script after script, and doesn't include any information such as who is speaking and the setting.  There are other sites that have full scripts, but you will get earlier drafts on some sites, not the final scripts and there may be important differences.  So be careful what the site tells you about the script.
 
Actually, as I think about it, it might be cumbersome, but using a script from Scriptorama, maybe you could use it to find passages that are unintelligible in the film and read them while stopping the film, then returning to the film.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 12:19 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

Rob,

        I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

        I understand what you're trying to solve, but I don't think that adding "a third layer" that's also presented auditorily will actually do that.  I guess it can't hurt to try, if it's possible, but I suspect a "making it worse, not better" outcome.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


Dzhovani
 

The KMPlayer has integration that allows for reading of textual subtitles. And yes, there is case for those people who are not english and cannot have everything translated to their languages with audio actors. And it is not ideal solution, but it works when there is no another way.
To set the kmplayer, open the player, press f2, find language and speech, find read with dictation and check read subtitles.
Warning, KMPlayer lately is a bloatware and tries to install all kinds of unnecessary stuff.


JM Casey
 

It’s been a while since I did this, but personally I download subtitles from a site like this one and read them on a braille display, since I want to hear the voices of the actors and not a synth. It is hard to keep up sometimees and there is no syncing with the video since I just read as a text file, but it’s doable, though sometimes you have to be a fast reader. Sighted people have this issue too though of not always being able to keep up with fast dialogue, even if they are at a bit of an advantage.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Oriana
Sent: January 12, 2020 3:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

 

For various reasons, the subtitles for many English and foreign films are available at https://www.opensubtitles.org . Keep in mind that the subtitle standard is to record the speaker name for every line, but many publicly contributed subtitles simply don't. Timing can also be extremely frustrating.

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020, 3:03 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I suppose you could turn off the sound of the film and just read the subtitles.  But if you are going to do that, you might do much better, in terms of accessibility, to see if the script of the movie is available.  There are some sites that are completely useless such as Scriptorama, (spelling) because the person goes through all the trouble of transcribing script after script, and doesn't include any information such as who is speaking and the setting.  There are other sites that have full scripts, but you will get earlier drafts on some sites, not the final scripts and there may be important differences.  So be careful what the site tells you about the script.

 

Actually, as I think about it, it might be cumbersome, but using a script from Scriptorama, maybe you could use it to find passages that are unintelligible in the film and read them while stopping the film, then returning to the film.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 12:19 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

 

Rob,

        I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

        I understand what you're trying to solve, but I don't think that adding "a third layer" that's also presented auditorily will actually do that.  I guess it can't hurt to try, if it's possible, but I suspect a "making it worse, not better" outcome.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


JM Casey
 

Braille is the only sensible way to handle this, in my opinion...would still
be nice to be able to get it to sync witht eh video but hey, at least it is
doable. The world is a big place and there are thousands of films I'd love
to see in languages other than the ones I know.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob Hudson
Sent: January 12, 2020 1:19 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have
the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized
subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

And that's why I said braille display. That's how I used to read them.


 

Hmmm while I like subtitles in audio description and find that nice, I'd find it destracting if a synth did it unless it was a good synth.

Its been something I have been looking at for a while.

While yes I have the vocaliser code factory voices and while they do ok for books and general gaming, some of their pronounciations and such could be better.

I listened to neospeech and found out that a voice is round 300 dollars a year subscription.

And while making a few files was a secondary goal I wanted to read with my screen reader and or sapi.

I have listened to the ivona voices but they seem to have the same issues as vocaliser does after a while.

I have listened to the acapella voices, and I may eventually buy them.

I also know a place where older neospeech voices exist I could still buy but that site is so old and has a lot of old stuff I am unsure if it still exists or not.


On 14/01/2020 8:04 am, JM Casey wrote:

It’s been a while since I did this, but personally I download subtitles from a site like this one and read them on a braille display, since I want to hear the voices of the actors and not a synth. It is hard to keep up sometimees and there is no syncing with the video since I just read as a text file, but it’s doable, though sometimes you have to be a fast reader. Sighted people have this issue too though of not always being able to keep up with fast dialogue, even if they are at a bit of an advantage.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Oriana
Sent: January 12, 2020 3:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

 

For various reasons, the subtitles for many English and foreign films are available at https://www.opensubtitles.org . Keep in mind that the subtitle standard is to record the speaker name for every line, but many publicly contributed subtitles simply don't. Timing can also be extremely frustrating.

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020, 3:03 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I suppose you could turn off the sound of the film and just read the subtitles.  But if you are going to do that, you might do much better, in terms of accessibility, to see if the script of the movie is available.  There are some sites that are completely useless such as Scriptorama, (spelling) because the person goes through all the trouble of transcribing script after script, and doesn't include any information such as who is speaking and the setting.  There are other sites that have full scripts, but you will get earlier drafts on some sites, not the final scripts and there may be important differences.  So be careful what the site tells you about the script.

 

Actually, as I think about it, it might be cumbersome, but using a script from Scriptorama, maybe you could use it to find passages that are unintelligible in the film and read them while stopping the film, then returning to the film.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 12:19 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

 

Rob,

        I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

        I understand what you're trying to solve, but I don't think that adding "a third layer" that's also presented auditorily will actually do that.  I guess it can't hurt to try, if it's possible, but I suspect a "making it worse, not better" outcome.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)

 

 


 

Hmmph, and if only real displays got less expensive.

Yeah I know there are 14-20 cell units but 20 cells is barely 2 lines.

Now something like the canute would be worth having but since any of the really good displays cost as much as a really top of the line gaming laptop, well put it this way, I know what I would want if I had to pay 3000 for it.

On 14/01/2020 8:45 am, JM Casey wrote:
Braille is the only sensible way to handle this, in my opinion...would still
be nice to be able to get it to sync witht eh video but hey, at least it is
doable. The world is a big place and there are thousands of films I'd love
to see in languages other than the ones I know.



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rob Hudson
Sent: January 12, 2020 1:19 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

Brian Vogel <@britechguy> wrote:
I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have
the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized
subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

And that's why I said braille display. That's how I used to read them.





 

Hello all,

Last time I checked, KMPlayer could output reading aloud of subtitles only via SAPI5 - no screen reader involved in this case. I don't know if braille output is possible in this case, but somehow - I doubt it.

On the other hand however, PotPlayer can output reading aloud of subtitles not only via SAPI5 or OneCore (with no screen reader involved), but with the screen reader involved (via UIA). The choice is left to the user. The options for configuring how the subtitle reading will occur Are located in PotPlayer's settings (opened with F5) -> Accessibility. The first group of options are for outputting via SAPI5/OneCore (TTS). The second group is for outputting via the screen reader. In the second choice, the subtitles are outputted as the title of the window. I don't know if this will help with reading the subtitles via braille, but you can try it and see. To stop the screen reader from reading the subtitles aloud via its voice, you can try disabling its speech (e.g. for NVDA - Insert+S or selecting "No Speech" as the current synthesizer). As I said - I'm not sure how well this will work, but try it if you want.

Hint: If you use the reading aloud via the screen reader option of PotPlayer and configure the screen reader to lower the volume of other audio while speaking, you can get a not bad dubbing result (winking smile).

P.S.: PotPlayer is also free as KMPlayer is, and I haven't noticed any bloatware in its installer.

______
Best wishes,
Kostadin Kolev

На 13.1.2020 г. в 21:53, Shaun Everiss написа:

Hmmm while I like subtitles in audio description and find that nice, I'd find it destracting if a synth did it unless it was a good synth.

Its been something I have been looking at for a while.

While yes I have the vocaliser code factory voices and while they do ok for books and general gaming, some of their pronounciations and such could be better.

I listened to neospeech and found out that a voice is round 300 dollars a year subscription.

And while making a few files was a secondary goal I wanted to read with my screen reader and or sapi.

I have listened to the ivona voices but they seem to have the same issues as vocaliser does after a while.

I have listened to the acapella voices, and I may eventually buy them.

I also know a place where older neospeech voices exist I could still buy but that site is so old and has a lot of old stuff I am unsure if it still exists or not.


On 14/01/2020 8:04 am, JM Casey wrote:

It’s been a while since I did this, but personally I download subtitles from a site like this one and read them on a braille display, since I want to hear the voices of the actors and not a synth. It is hard to keep up sometimees and there is no syncing with the video since I just read as a text file, but it’s doable, though sometimes you have to be a fast reader. Sighted people have this issue too though of not always being able to keep up with fast dialogue, even if they are at a bit of an advantage.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Oriana
Sent: January 12, 2020 3:22 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

 

For various reasons, the subtitles for many English and foreign films are available at https://www.opensubtitles.org . Keep in mind that the subtitle standard is to record the speaker name for every line, but many publicly contributed subtitles simply don't. Timing can also be extremely frustrating.

 

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020, 3:03 PM Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

I suppose you could turn off the sound of the film and just read the subtitles.  But if you are going to do that, you might do much better, in terms of accessibility, to see if the script of the movie is available.  There are some sites that are completely useless such as Scriptorama, (spelling) because the person goes through all the trouble of transcribing script after script, and doesn't include any information such as who is speaking and the setting.  There are other sites that have full scripts, but you will get earlier drafts on some sites, not the final scripts and there may be important differences.  So be careful what the site tells you about the script.

 

Actually, as I think about it, it might be cumbersome, but using a script from Scriptorama, maybe you could use it to find passages that are unintelligible in the film and read them while stopping the film, then returning to the film.

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

From: Brian Vogel

Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 12:19 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA - Can it read the subtitles in movies?

 

Rob,

        I get what you're saying, but just imagine what it would be like to have the dialog, the background noise that's part of the scene, and synthesized subtitles all being churned out at the same time.

        I understand what you're trying to solve, but I don't think that adding "a third layer" that's also presented auditorily will actually do that.  I guess it can't hurt to try, if it's possible, but I suspect a "making it worse, not better" outcome.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 1909, Build 18363  

Most of the change we think we see in life is due to truths being in and out of favor.

         ~ Robert Frost, The Black Cottage (1914)