Topics

Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?

Martin McCormick
 

Great question. This program is short on self-documentation but
I did run it via narrator which shows a completely different
layout for the screen and one can read the Read and Write buttons
without running the program. If you have narrator on instead of
nvda, the program does put the Read button on the screen and it
changes to Write when the Down Arrow is pressed.

It's definitely part of that particular program.

Martin
"Gene" <gsasner@...> writes:

Did you look in the menus and see if there is an item that, when you move
to it, announces p as the short cut? Or it could be a menu itself, such
as the file menu in menu programs or the edit menu as examples.

Gene

Gene
 

Did you look in the menus and see if there is an item that, when you move to it, announces p as the short cut?  Or it could be a menu itself, such as the file menu in menu programs or the edit menu as examples. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 24, 2020 12:00 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?

Thank you to all who responded.  I just thought I had
seen Alt + P in either a Windows10 book I was reading or one of
the nvda documentation files I have but all of you were right.
The software is named gd-77s as it is specifically for a two-way
radio with that specific model number.  It is a Windows program
that allows one to load the radio with frequency power-level and
other important data so that the radio works properly on whatever
channels it is supposed to work on.

Alt + P opens up two choices for the user, Read and
Write.  Read is getting the radio's current program state by
connecting a usb cable to the radio and downloading it's current
configuration.  Writing involves pouring out the settings you
have configured from your computer to the radio.

When nvda is set to beep at various pitches depending on
the vertical position of the focus, the progress graphic becomes
audible as a series of ascending beeps.  It reminds me of a large
jug being filled or what somebody's cat might sound like walking
on a musical keyboard.

That turns out to be useful because the usb interface is
flaky and one has to keep connecting and disconnecting it before
the Read and Write operations work.  When they fail, you don't
get any kind of message but instead get dumped back to the main
program screen.

I come from the unix command-line world after 25 years of
writing C, perl and shell scripts plus almost 5 years of
retirement so Windows is a new world but I also have been using a
Mac for ten or so years making the GUI a little more familiar but
I still need to learn a lot.

Anyway, many thanks and I have a nvda question I'll save
for another message as this software is a perfect nvda training
tool as it makes constant use of NVDA + numpad-/ to change focus.

Martin McCormick

"Gene" <gsasner@...> writes:
> You may use it in this or that program.  But it is a program command. 
> Screen-readers wouldn't use such commands because they are too likely to
> interfere with program commands.  Alt and a letter or number while
> working with menus, is the standard way of executing a menu short cut. 
> That's another reason screen-readers wouldn't use it, that interface is
> already reserved and it would cause confusion.
>
> I am going into all this because I don't know if you have received the
> kind of training that made such things clear and it also may clarify
> things for others.
>
> Gene
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Martin McCormick
> Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 4:08 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: Re: [nvda] Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?
>
>
> Thank you.  That helps a lot.
> I got out of the software I was running and simply opened
> a new window and alt + p did nothing at all except that nvda
> echoed the key strokes.
>
> nvda and Windows10 both have a rich set of keyboard
> commands and I could have sworn that alt + p looked familiar.
>
> Martin
>
> "JM Casey" <jmcasey@...> writes:
> > It's definitely not an NVDA command. Any keystroke like that would be
> for
>
>
>
>
>
>


Martin McCormick
 

Thank you to all who responded. I just thought I had
seen Alt + P in either a Windows10 book I was reading or one of
the nvda documentation files I have but all of you were right.
The software is named gd-77s as it is specifically for a two-way
radio with that specific model number. It is a Windows program
that allows one to load the radio with frequency power-level and
other important data so that the radio works properly on whatever
channels it is supposed to work on.

Alt + P opens up two choices for the user, Read and
Write. Read is getting the radio's current program state by
connecting a usb cable to the radio and downloading it's current
configuration. Writing involves pouring out the settings you
have configured from your computer to the radio.

When nvda is set to beep at various pitches depending on
the vertical position of the focus, the progress graphic becomes
audible as a series of ascending beeps. It reminds me of a large
jug being filled or what somebody's cat might sound like walking
on a musical keyboard.

That turns out to be useful because the usb interface is
flaky and one has to keep connecting and disconnecting it before
the Read and Write operations work. When they fail, you don't
get any kind of message but instead get dumped back to the main
program screen.

I come from the unix command-line world after 25 years of
writing C, perl and shell scripts plus almost 5 years of
retirement so Windows is a new world but I also have been using a
Mac for ten or so years making the GUI a little more familiar but
I still need to learn a lot.

Anyway, many thanks and I have a nvda question I'll save
for another message as this software is a perfect nvda training
tool as it makes constant use of NVDA + numpad-/ to change focus.

Martin McCormick

"Gene" <gsasner@...> writes:

You may use it in this or that program. But it is a program command.
Screen-readers wouldn't use such commands because they are too likely to
interfere with program commands. Alt and a letter or number while
working with menus, is the standard way of executing a menu short cut.
That's another reason screen-readers wouldn't use it, that interface is
already reserved and it would cause confusion.

I am going into all this because I don't know if you have received the
kind of training that made such things clear and it also may clarify
things for others.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Martin McCormick
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 4:08 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?


Thank you. That helps a lot.
I got out of the software I was running and simply opened
a new window and alt + p did nothing at all except that nvda
echoed the key strokes.

nvda and Windows10 both have a rich set of keyboard
commands and I could have sworn that alt + p looked familiar.

Martin

"JM Casey" <jmcasey@...> writes:
It's definitely not an NVDA command. Any keystroke like that would be
for





Cecelia Rodriguez
 

Windows

On Jan 21, 2020, at 4:31 PM, Martin McCormick <martin.m@...> wrote:

 I was listening to a demo of some software when someone
needed to upload a file from their computer to an attached radio
and they used alt + p. This gives you two alternatives, r and w
which is easy enough to follow so far except that I get that
unceremonious dumpout you get when you hit the wrong button and
the effect is the same as typing Escape. You just go back to
whatever was going on before typing alt + p.

Thanks.

Martin McCormick


Gene
 

You may use it in this or that program.  But it is a program command.  Screen-readers wouldn't use such commands because they are too likely to interfere with program commands.  Alt and a letter or number while working with menus, is the standard way of executing a menu short cut.  That's another reason screen-readers wouldn't use it, that interface is already reserved and it would cause confusion. 
 
I am going into all this because I don't know if you have received the kind of training that made such things clear and it also may clarify things for others. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 4:08 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?

Thank you.  That helps a lot. 
I got out of the software I was running and simply opened
a new window and alt + p did nothing at all except that nvda
echoed the key strokes.

nvda and Windows10 both have a rich set of keyboard
commands and I could have sworn that alt + p looked familiar.

Martin

"JM Casey" <jmcasey@...> writes:
> It's definitely not an NVDA command. Any keystroke like that would be for


Gene
 

Very likely neither.  Not always, but very often, commands that take actions in programs are program commands.  Those that take actions in Windows are Windows commands.  Screen-readers tell you what is on-screen, give you ways to review the information or to work with it such as browse mode, to compensate for there being no good way to do so if the screen-reader doesn't provide its own interface, and allows you to read specific things, such as the title bar or the clock that a sighted person would look at.
 
Consider the context.  Someone is giving a demonstration.  It appears the person is using some sort of program to allow multiple people to listen.  So he is very likely using a program command for the program he is using for that purpose.
 
Just what that command does, I'm not sure.  Try looking through the menus if you are using the same program.  This sort of approach and information may help you look around programs and learn about them.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 3:30 PM
Subject: [nvda] Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?

I was listening to a demo of some software when someone
needed to upload a file from their computer to an attached radio
and they used alt + p.  This gives you two alternatives, r and w
which is easy enough to follow so far except that I get that
unceremonious dumpout you get when you hit the wrong button and
the effect is the same as typing Escape.  You just go back to
whatever was going on before typing alt + p.

Thanks.

Martin McCormick


Luke Davis
 

Martin

It is probably an application specific command.
NVDA would only have a command like that if it had been defined in some add-on.
Windows would only have a command like that if it was defined on a menubar, a ribbon, or as a temporary shortcut. Even in these latter cases, it is really an application specific command.

However, since you didn't tell us what software you were using at the time, it is very hard to say exactly what this key was supposed to do, or why it might have behaved unexpectedly.

How were you listening to the demo?
What is the software you were in?
Is it the same as the software used in the demo?

Luke

On Tue, 21 Jan 2020, Martin McCormick wrote:

I was listening to a demo of some software when someone
needed to upload a file from their computer to an attached radio
and they used alt + p. This gives you two alternatives, r and w
which is easy enough to follow so far except that I get that
unceremonious dumpout you get when you hit the wrong button and
the effect is the same as typing Escape. You just go back to
whatever was going on before typing alt + p.

Martin McCormick
 

Thank you. That helps a lot.
I got out of the software I was running and simply opened
a new window and alt + p did nothing at all except that nvda
echoed the key strokes.

nvda and Windows10 both have a rich set of keyboard
commands and I could have sworn that alt + p looked familiar.

Martin

"JM Casey" <jmcasey@...> writes:

It's definitely not an NVDA command. Any keystroke like that would be for

JM Casey
 

It's definitely not an NVDA command. Any keystroke like that would be for
whatever programme you were using in the foreground at the time, normally.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Martin
McCormick
Sent: January 21, 2020 4:31 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is alt + p a nvda or a Windows command?

I was listening to a demo of some software when someone needed to
upload a file from their computer to an attached radio and they used alt +
p. This gives you two alternatives, r and w which is easy enough to follow
so far except that I get that unceremonious dumpout you get when you hit the
wrong button and the effect is the same as typing Escape. You just go back
to whatever was going on before typing alt + p.

Thanks.

Martin McCormick

Martin McCormick
 

I was listening to a demo of some software when someone
needed to upload a file from their computer to an attached radio
and they used alt + p. This gives you two alternatives, r and w
which is easy enough to follow so far except that I get that
unceremonious dumpout you get when you hit the wrong button and
the effect is the same as typing Escape. You just go back to
whatever was going on before typing alt + p.

Thanks.

Martin McCormick