Future of Access


tonea.ctr.morrow@...
 

I'm sure you already have heard, but just in case you haven't, the U.S. laws regarding software and website access are generally called 508 and were put in place about 2000. As of January 18th, a refresh of 508 goes into effect.

The official name for the refresh is 36 CFR 1194 and it has many parts. Sections 1 to 5 (they use roman numerals) are details on how the refresh was accomplished and the conclusions determined. Any Americans might want to read that so you can get an idea of how you can become involved in future updates of 508. The actual changes to the code are the appendices. Appendix D is the old code (currently in effect) that will be kept for anything "grandfathered". Appendix A contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 508. Appendix B contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 255 (hardware). And, Appendix C contains Chapters 3 to 7 of the code and will apply to both 508 and 255.

This link will take you to the U.S. Access Board website where the whole thing is posted for public viewing:
https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/final-rule/i-executive-summary

It defaults to section I of 36 CFR 1194, but you can use any of the links to jump to the portion of the code that you want.

Tonea Morrow


Brian Moore
 

I actually thought this was on hold again!  It would be nice because the new rules refer to WCAG 2.0 for web accessibility stuff which is what we in the rest of the world are using.


Many countries have similar regulations but more and more, with a couple of exceptions, WCAG is the standard refered to by most countries.


anyway, this discussion is straying out of NVDA territory so it should likely end here.


sorry, when you work in it for a living, this stuff is actually exciting!


Brian.

Contact me on skype: brian.moore
follow me on twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/bmoore123

On 12/08/2017 11:26 AM, tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:
I'm sure you already have heard, but just in case you haven't, the U.S. laws regarding software and website access are generally called 508 and were put in place about 2000. As of January 18th, a refresh of 508 goes into effect.

The official name for the refresh is 36 CFR 1194 and it has many parts. Sections 1 to 5 (they use roman numerals) are details on how the refresh was accomplished and the conclusions determined. Any Americans might want to read that so you can get an idea of how you can become involved in future updates of 508. The actual changes to the code are the appendices. Appendix D is the old code (currently in effect) that will be kept for anything "grandfathered". Appendix A contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 508. Appendix B contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 255 (hardware). And, Appendix C contains Chapters 3 to 7 of the code and will apply to both 508 and 255.

This link will take you to the U.S. Access Board website where the whole thing is posted for public viewing:
https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/final-rule/i-executive-summary

It defaults to section I of 36 CFR 1194, but you can use any of the links to jump to the portion of the code that you want.

Tonea Morrow


Adriani Botez
 

Nv access should definitely keep an eye on this trend.


Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 08.12.2017 um 17:43 schrieb Brian Moore <bmoore@screenreview.org>:

I actually thought this was on hold again! It would be nice because the new rules refer to WCAG 2.0 for web accessibility stuff which is what we in the rest of the world are using.


Many countries have similar regulations but more and more, with a couple of exceptions, WCAG is the standard refered to by most countries.


anyway, this discussion is straying out of NVDA territory so it should likely end here.


sorry, when you work in it for a living, this stuff is actually exciting!


Brian.

Contact me on skype: brian.moore
follow me on twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/bmoore123

On 12/08/2017 11:26 AM, tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:
I'm sure you already have heard, but just in case you haven't, the U.S. laws regarding software and website access are generally called 508 and were put in place about 2000. As of January 18th, a refresh of 508 goes into effect.

The official name for the refresh is 36 CFR 1194 and it has many parts. Sections 1 to 5 (they use roman numerals) are details on how the refresh was accomplished and the conclusions determined. Any Americans might want to read that so you can get an idea of how you can become involved in future updates of 508. The actual changes to the code are the appendices. Appendix D is the old code (currently in effect) that will be kept for anything "grandfathered". Appendix A contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 508. Appendix B contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 255 (hardware). And, Appendix C contains Chapters 3 to 7 of the code and will apply to both 508 and 255.

This link will take you to the U.S. Access Board website where the whole thing is posted for public viewing:
https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/final-rule/i-executive-summary

It defaults to section I of 36 CFR 1194, but you can use any of the links to jump to the portion of the code that you want.

Tonea Morrow




Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I have no idea, but the fact is that the fcc have made all tv and other makers their appliances accessible, which should benefit the rest of the world merely due to the fact that the us is a big market and product makers will not want to just sell this new stuff over there will they.
Brian

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Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
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----- Original Message -----
From: <tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, December 08, 2017 4:26 PM
Subject: [nvda] Future of Access


I'm sure you already have heard, but just in case you haven't, the U.S. laws regarding software and website access are generally called 508 and were put in place about 2000. As of January 18th, a refresh of 508 goes into effect.

The official name for the refresh is 36 CFR 1194 and it has many parts. Sections 1 to 5 (they use roman numerals) are details on how the refresh was accomplished and the conclusions determined. Any Americans might want to read that so you can get an idea of how you can become involved in future updates of 508. The actual changes to the code are the appendices. Appendix D is the old code (currently in effect) that will be kept for anything "grandfathered". Appendix A contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 508. Appendix B contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 255 (hardware). And, Appendix C contains Chapters 3 to 7 of the code and will apply to both 508 and 255.

This link will take you to the U.S. Access Board website where the whole thing is posted for public viewing:
https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/final-rule/i-executive-summary

It defaults to section I of 36 CFR 1194, but you can use any of the links to jump to the portion of the code that you want.

Tonea Morrow



tonea.ctr.morrow@...
 

The whole discussion on cell phones lacking accessibility is why I put up the information on the 508 Refresh. Simply put, it requires hardware developers who provide an OS that accompanies the hardware to also provide a certain level of accessibility. I may be looking at it with rose-colored glasses, but it must either support attachable access or provide access, that includes speech functions.

 

Tonea Morrow

 


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes I'm ecstatic, really I am.... grin.
It would be nice once in a while if the techies could write a version for the masses to ask what they think that does not run into pages of tech and bullshit.

Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Moore" <bmoore@screenreview.org>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, December 08, 2017 4:43 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Future of Access


I actually thought this was on hold again! It would be nice because the
new rules refer to WCAG 2.0 for web accessibility stuff which is what we
in the rest of the world are using.


Many countries have similar regulations but more and more, with a couple
of exceptions, WCAG is the standard refered to by most countries.


anyway, this discussion is straying out of NVDA territory so it should
likely end here.


sorry, when you work in it for a living, this stuff is actually exciting!


Brian.

Contact me on skype: brian.moore
follow me on twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/bmoore123

On 12/08/2017 11:26 AM, tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:
I'm sure you already have heard, but just in case you haven't, the U.S. laws regarding software and website access are generally called 508 and were put in place about 2000. As of January 18th, a refresh of 508 goes into effect.

The official name for the refresh is 36 CFR 1194 and it has many parts. Sections 1 to 5 (they use roman numerals) are details on how the refresh was accomplished and the conclusions determined. Any Americans might want to read that so you can get an idea of how you can become involved in future updates of 508. The actual changes to the code are the appendices. Appendix D is the old code (currently in effect) that will be kept for anything "grandfathered". Appendix A contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 508. Appendix B contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 255 (hardware). And, Appendix C contains Chapters 3 to 7 of the code and will apply to both 508 and 255.

This link will take you to the U.S. Access Board website where the whole thing is posted for public viewing:
https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/final-rule/i-executive-summary

It defaults to section I of 36 CFR 1194, but you can use any of the links to jump to the portion of the code that you want.

Tonea Morrow



Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Or perhaps an ear?
grin.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Adriani Botez" <adriani.botez@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, December 08, 2017 4:45 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Future of Access


Nv access should definitely keep an eye on this trend.


Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 08.12.2017 um 17:43 schrieb Brian Moore <bmoore@screenreview.org>:

I actually thought this was on hold again! It would be nice because the new rules refer to WCAG 2.0 for web accessibility stuff which is what we in the rest of the world are using.


Many countries have similar regulations but more and more, with a couple of exceptions, WCAG is the standard refered to by most countries.


anyway, this discussion is straying out of NVDA territory so it should likely end here.


sorry, when you work in it for a living, this stuff is actually exciting!


Brian.

Contact me on skype: brian.moore
follow me on twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/bmoore123

On 12/08/2017 11:26 AM, tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:
I'm sure you already have heard, but just in case you haven't, the U.S. laws regarding software and website access are generally called 508 and were put in place about 2000. As of January 18th, a refresh of 508 goes into effect.

The official name for the refresh is 36 CFR 1194 and it has many parts. Sections 1 to 5 (they use roman numerals) are details on how the refresh was accomplished and the conclusions determined. Any Americans might want to read that so you can get an idea of how you can become involved in future updates of 508. The actual changes to the code are the appendices. Appendix D is the old code (currently in effect) that will be kept for anything "grandfathered". Appendix A contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 508. Appendix B contains the Chapters 1 and 2 of the new code 255 (hardware). And, Appendix C contains Chapters 3 to 7 of the code and will apply to both 508 and 255.

This link will take you to the U.S. Access Board website where the whole thing is posted for public viewing:
https://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-ict-refresh/final-rule/i-executive-summary

It defaults to section I of 36 CFR 1194, but you can use any of the links to jump to the portion of the code that you want.

Tonea Morrow




 

It all depends, not everyone will be like apple is with access or google to a point.

They may just put in something that makes it accessible but not really.

Here is the thing, microsoft is promoting access even for games in a real big way and they are one of the big kids

I don't fully scoff this though, soni has put in access for its stuff, and a lot of hardware manufacturers are trying to make things app based for phones.

But not everyone is playing nice, at least not fully nice.

As I said before the companies that made it first will still not want to share, they will find ways to hold things back.

On 9/12/2017 6:14 a.m., tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:
The whole discussion on cell phones lacking accessibility is why I put up the information on the 508 Refresh. Simply put, it requires hardware developers who provide an OS that accompanies the hardware to also provide a certain level of accessibility. I may be looking at it with rose-colored glasses, but it must either support attachable access or provide access, that includes speech functions.

Tonea Morrow


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

If the designers do not understand blind access you often end up ith an api that does not have all the 'signal's lets call them that the access software might need making the designer still need to hack or screen scrape to get at the other vital parts.
Brian

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Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Shaun Everiss" <sm.everiss@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2017 10:15 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Future of Access


It all depends, not everyone will be like apple is with access or google to a point.

They may just put in something that makes it accessible but not really.

Here is the thing, microsoft is promoting access even for games in a real big way and they are one of the big kids

I don't fully scoff this though, soni has put in access for its stuff, and a lot of hardware manufacturers are trying to make things app based for phones.

But not everyone is playing nice, at least not fully nice.

As I said before the companies that made it first will still not want to share, they will find ways to hold things back.



On 9/12/2017 6:14 a.m., tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:
The whole discussion on cell phones lacking accessibility is why I put up the information on the 508 Refresh. Simply put, it requires hardware developers who provide an OS that accompanies the hardware to also provide a certain level of accessibility. I may be looking at it with rose-colored glasses, but it must either support attachable access or provide access, that includes speech functions.

Tonea Morrow