Parenthesis


tonea.ctr.morrow@...
 

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 


Antony Stone
 

Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text
editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for
yourself?

Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies
according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get
different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each
person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to
it.


Antony.

On Tuesday 12 December 2017 at 17:12:36, tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov wrote:

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech?
How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant)
is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience
will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

Thanks!

Tonea
--
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please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

It depends on how the individual user has punctuation set in the screen-reader.  Just use parenthesis as you would generally.  It's up to the user to set the screen-reader as desired and to understand what will and won't be heard.  Usually, items in parenthesis are understandable as peripheral comments from context.  Sighted readers reading audio books don't give pronunciation and other such marks, the context is clear without them.  If the blind person is in a situation where the person is uncertain, it's the person's responsibility to check what is being read for punctuation if the person has punctuation turned off in the screen-reader. 
 
Accessibility means making things accessible.  It doesn't mean compensating for the user's responsibilities.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:12 AM
Subject: [nvda] Parenthesis

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 


Brian Moore
 

Hi.  Depends on how the user has their punctuation level set.

For example, for reading email, I have most of mine off so I had to go and manually look at what was written to figure out where they were.

I believe the default for most screen readers is to have more punctuation spoken than I have so they would hear it.

Contact me on skype: brian.moore
follow me on twitter:
http://www.twitter.com/bmoore123
On 12/12/2017 11:12 AM, tonea.ctr.morrow@... wrote:

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 



tonea.ctr.morrow@...
 

No, actually, I can’t. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:

 

The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing – (minus) to zoom out.

 

To a sighted person, the word “plus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word “minus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.

 

Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)

 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?

 

Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.

 

 

Antony.

 


Gene
 

this just proves my point.  I was reading your message with punctuation completely off.  It read completely legibly.  I didn't hear two pluses because punctuation off meant I didn't hear the plus sign and I didn't hear the punctuation.  I simply hear the one written out word plus and the sentence read just as it should.  Don't worry about altering common practices in writing.  Blind people read writing all over constantly that is written using all common conventions.  the blind person must learn to understand what is being read.  When reading material, the blind person is constantly reading material written for sighted readers and must understand the conventions. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:35 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

No, actually, I can’t. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:

 

The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing – (minus) to zoom out.

 

To a sighted person, the word “plus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word “minus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.

 

Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)

 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?

 

Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.

 

 

Antony.

 


 

Hi,

For Tonea and others: some of the things I say below are a bit technical, but I think it is important for you to understand some behind the scenes work:

 

A screen reader really doesn’t care how it sees most punctuations, as it is ultimately up to users and speech synthesizers to handle this part. Contrary to what you may have heard, a screen reader is just like any program (Lotus Notes, Excel, apps used by Social Security Administration, etc.) in that it does what it is told to do: read what is presented on screen. Just like any complex software, screen readers are composed of many modules, with different modules working together to help a blind or visually impaired computer user what he or she needs to do.

 

Without going into deeper details, what I can tell you is that the way NVDA announces punctuations involve at least three components:

  • Text gatherer: this part of the screen reader gathers what is on screen, including potential text and control information.
  • Text enhancer and user settings: with help from users, the screen reader will format the text so the last component (below) will speak what the screen reader tells it to speak.
  • Text-to-speech: commonly packaged as part of a speech synthesis engine (or hardware), this reads what a program tells it to read (in this case, a screen reader such as NVDA will send text to the synthesizer with or without modifications asked by users).

In terms of NVDA components, these components are accessibility API’s and text infos, configuration database and speech dictionaries, and speech synthesizers, respectively.

 

Note the fact that how the screen reader will say things depend on user’s preferences. This is the reason why I (a fellow technical author, although going through training) and others cannot really prescribe how things should be formatted regarding punctuations. Although some level of control from screen readers is possible, it is ultimately up to users and speech synthesizers to decide how they’ll perceive text and react to them in your deliverables.

 

An additional comment: I do understand that some organizations might oppose certain classes of software for security reasons. I personally believe that NVDA can offer something few screen readers can offer: access to internals, thereby letting officials and auditors take a look at internals of how a screen reader works. I’d like to personally question the stances of your employer regarding having no access to a screen reader, because I think at least you (Tonea) should be given a chance to experiment with at least one for a while in hopes of improving your understanding of needs of your audience.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of tonea.ctr.morrow@...
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 8:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

No, actually, I can’t. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:

 

The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing – (minus) to zoom out.

 

To a sighted person, the word “plus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word “minus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.

 

Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)

 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?

 

Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.

 

 

Antony.

 


tonea.ctr.morrow@...
 

I had asked about parenthesis because someone had told me that the screen reader speaks capitalization differently than regular letters. For example, ALL CAPS IN A SENTENCE causes the reader to say those words with “emphasis” or to yell. I didn’t know there were punctuation settings. I just wondered if words in parenthesis were whispered or otherwise spoken differently.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 


Kwork
 

With my punctuation set to some, it pauses on either side of the parenthesis. A comma does the same thing, so I would have to guess which is a paren and which a comma. Not that big a deal for me. If I really want to know, I'll investigate on my own. I don't know about other punctuation levels as about all I use is some, so others would be able to answer that better.

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 9:12 AM
Subject: [nvda] Parenthesis

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 


Devin Prater
 

All caps are not read any differently than any other text.

Devin Prater
Assistive Technology instructor in training, JAWS Sertified.

On Dec 12, 2017, at 12:29 PM, Kwork <istherelife@...> wrote:

With my punctuation set to some, it pauses on either side of the parenthesis. A comma does the same thing, so I would have to guess which is a paren and which a comma. Not that big a deal for me. If I really want to know, I'll investigate on my own. I don't know about other punctuation levels as about all I use is some, so others would be able to answer that better.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 9:12 AM
Subject: [nvda] Parenthesis

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 


Gene
 

I don't know if any screen-readers let you make any such adjustments.  By default, none of what you were told is correct.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 11:47 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

I had asked about parenthesis because someone had told me that the screen reader speaks capitalization differently than regular letters. For example, ALL CAPS IN A SENTENCE causes the reader to say those words with “emphasis” or to yell. I didn’t know there were punctuation settings. I just wondered if words in parenthesis were whispered or otherwise spoken differently.

 

Thanks!

 

Tonea

 


Rayn Darren
 

I realize you cannot load anything not required for your job on your machine at work, however, as accessibility is part of your job, it could be argued that NVDA or the trial version of Jaws as well as a magnifier program would in fact be a necessity. That being said, you could always load it onto your personal computer and have a look round at settings.

 

Rayn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of tonea.ctr.morrow@...
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 8:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

No, actually, I can’t. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:

 

The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing – (minus) to zoom out.

 

To a sighted person, the word “plus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word “minus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.

 

Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)

 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?

 

Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.

 

 

Antony.

 


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Hi,

Or, the employer should at least let you use Narrator (provided this is a Windows 10 computer).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rayn Darren
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 12:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

I realize you cannot load anything not required for your job on your machine at work, however, as accessibility is part of your job, it could be argued that NVDA or the trial version of Jaws as well as a magnifier program would in fact be a necessity. That being said, you could always load it onto your personal computer and have a look round at settings.

 

Rayn

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of tonea.ctr.morrow@...
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 8:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

No, actually, I can’t. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:

 

The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing – (minus) to zoom out.

 

To a sighted person, the word “plus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word “minus” in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.

 

Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)

 

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

 

Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?

 

Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.

 

 

Antony.

 

 

Virus-free. www.avast.com


 

hi.
for me who set my punctuation set to none, it pauses on either side of
the parenthesis. A comma does the same thing, so I would have to guess
which is a paren and which a comma.
i dont want to hear punctuations and set it to none.
meanwhile, for capital letters, the first character of every word only
can be capitalized.
if not, espeak in nvda, reads many words letter by letter or
ununderstandable and bad manner that its explanation is not easy for
me to say in english.

On 12/12/17, Joseph Lee <joseph.lee22590@gmail.com> wrote:
Hi,

Or, the employer should at least let you use Narrator (provided this is a
Windows 10 computer).

Cheers,

Joseph



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rayn
Darren
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 12:23 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis



I realize you cannot load anything not required for your job on your
machine
at work, however, as accessibility is part of your job, it could be argued
that NVDA or the trial version of Jaws as well as a magnifier program would
in fact be a necessity. That being said, you could always load it onto your
personal computer and have a look round at settings.



Rayn



From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of
tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 8:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis



No, actually, I can't. I work on a contract with the United States
Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does
not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals
and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like
this:



The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus)
to
zoom in or while pressing - (minus) to zoom out.



To a sighted person, the word "plus" in parenthesis clarifies that the
symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word "minus" in parenthesis
clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or
an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen
reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to
take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the
previous example I gave will help a lot.



Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the
knee.)



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
[mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis



Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text
editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for
yourself?



Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies
according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get
different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same
for
each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be
used to it.





Antony.







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Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Depends on the level of punctuation set and whether the level of anything has been altered by the user as I have for greater than and less than. I have also configured many symbols to speak the UK English version, ie bang is Exclamation.
So the answer really is up to the listeners settings. Some say a proof reader may put on all punctuation and symbols others, reading it as a piece of text may hate all the interruptions so have it ignore stuff.
Brian

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Please address personal email to:-
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----- Original Message -----
From: <tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 4:12 PM
Subject: [nvda] Parenthesis


How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

Thanks!

Tonea


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

But minus did not get read here.
Brian

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Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: <tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 4:35 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis


No, actually, I can't. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:



The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing - (minus) to zoom out.



To a sighted person, the word "plus" in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word "minus" in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.



Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis



Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?



Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.





Antony.


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes as an aside if it made no sense, one just stops the reading and cursors over the offending bits to clarify. Turning off punctuation only happens normally for the reading of text, not the entry or reading it a character at a time.
Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@ripco.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 4:46 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis


this just proves my point. I was reading your message with punctuation completely off. It read completely legibly. I didn't hear two pluses because punctuation off meant I didn't hear the plus sign and I didn't hear the punctuation. I simply hear the one written out word plus and the sentence read just as it should. Don't worry about altering common practices in writing. Blind people read writing all over constantly that is written using all common conventions. the blind person must learn to understand what is being read. When reading material, the blind person is constantly reading material written for sighted readers and must understand the conventions.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis


No, actually, I can't. I work on a contract with the United States Government, so I only have on the computer what I am given, and that does not include any screen-reading software. I am sighted. I write help manuals and help files for software that other people write. I have sentences like this:



The second zoom method is to hold the control key while pressing + (plus) to zoom in or while pressing - (minus) to zoom out.



To a sighted person, the word "plus" in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows is a plus symbol, just as the word "minus" in parenthesis clarifies that the symbol it follows in a minus symbol and not a hyphen or an em-dash or some other symbol. I literally need to know how your screen reader treats words or phrases that are in parenthesis so I can write to take your perception into account. The example above, combined with the previous example I gave will help a lot.



Tonea (by the way, it is pronounced Toe knee uh, with the accent on the knee.)



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Antony Stone
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 10:17 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis



Um, can't you just type a paragraph such as the one you wrote, into a text editor, and then get NVDA to read it back to you, so you can tell for yourself?



Bear in mind though that this might be one of those things that varies according to the speech synthesiser in use, so different users might get different effects - but at least whatever the effect is will be the same for each person as they always get for that type of input, so they should be used to it.





Antony.


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

No one issue with all caps is that some words may indeed be said badly as its not expected, also using some caps can throw some synths into roman numerals mode and hence for example VI people can say 6 people or Roman 6 people. Also some caps strings like NY can say New York and some abbreviations that are ambiguous can in some languages be expanded to measurements or even currencies.

This is why anyone writing documents really does need to have some screenreaders and synths handy.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: <tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 5:47 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis


I had asked about parenthesis because someone had told me that the screen reader speaks capitalization differently than regular letters. For example, ALL CAPS IN A SENTENCE causes the reader to say those words with "emphasis" or to yell. I didn't know there were punctuation settings. I just wondered if words in parenthesis were whispered or otherwise spoken differently.

Thanks!

Tonea


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

I disagree see my other post. A lot depends on the synth though.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Devin Prater" <r.d.t.prater@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:45 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis


All caps are not read any differently than any other text.

Devin Prater
Assistive Technology instructor in training, JAWS Sertified.

On Dec 12, 2017, at 12:29 PM, Kwork <istherelife@gmail.com> wrote:

With my punctuation set to some, it pauses on either side of the parenthesis. A comma does the same thing, so I would have to guess which is a paren and which a comma. Not that big a deal for me. If I really want to know, I'll investigate on my own. I don't know about other punctuation levels as about all I use is some, so others would be able to answer that better.
----- Original Message -----
From: tonea.ctr.morrow@faa.gov
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 9:12 AM
Subject: [nvda] Parenthesis

How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.

Thanks!

Tonea


Gene
 

But I don't believe in altering standard text for screen-readers on a site for the general public.  Maybe, on a site intended only or almost     exclusively for blind people.  I haven't given that any thought.  But when we read books, if a chapter title is in all capitals, we either learn how to deal with it if it causes problems, or we don't.  This sort of thing goes far beyond the requirements of accessibility.  Screen-reader users have a responsibility to know something about the program they are using.  If all caps did cause me a problem, I would look at the line and spell what isn't being pronounced correctly.  You don't build a street so that people who don't know how to drive can drive on it.  You build a street for licensed drivers.  You shouldn't alter text under normal conditions because some blind people may not know how to use their screen-readers. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, December 13, 2017 12:19 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis

I disagree see my other post. A lot depends on the synth though.
 Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Devin Prater" <r.d.t.prater@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:45 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Parenthesis


All caps are not read any differently than any other text.

Devin Prater
Assistive Technology instructor in training, JAWS Sertified.

> On Dec 12, 2017, at 12:29 PM, Kwork <istherelife@...> wrote:
>
> With my punctuation set to some, it pauses on either side of the
> parenthesis. A comma does the same thing, so I would have to guess which
> is a paren and which a comma. Not that big a deal for me. If I really want
> to know, I'll investigate on my own. I don't know about other punctuation
> levels as about all I use is some, so others would be able to answer that
> better.
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: tonea.ctr.morrow@...
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2017 9:12 AM
> Subject: [nvda] Parenthesis
>
> How does the software treat parenthesis (such as this) when it does
> speech? How does it convey to the listener that the comment (possibly
> unimportant) is an aside comment? I need to know so I can understand how
> my audience will hear it, both literally and figuratively.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Tonea
>
>