An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds


Gene
 

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Devin Prater
 

This seriously sounds like an amazing idea. 

Devin Prater
Assistive Technology instructor in training, JAWS Sertified.

On Dec 14, 2017, at 4:46 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Antony Stone
 

This reminds me of precisely what I used to do in the 1970s with an AM radio
next to a PDP-8 minicomputer.

Reminiscences aside, though, do you think it's possible for NVDA to get this
sort of hardware-level information (and without interfering with it by the
very action of trying to find out what the CPU was doing before NVDA started
finding out what it was doing)?

I also wonder how specific this sort of information is to your design of
motherboard and sound card - another design which has components placed
differently (or better smoothing capacitors on the sound card's power supply
lines) might not be able to detect these fluctuations at all.


Antony.

On Thursday 14 December 2017 at 11:46:06, Gene wrote:

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't
see much use in sounds in general. That isn't the case. I think many
sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very
easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds
that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently
available.

Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.
They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working
softly. I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to
get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful. For example, if
I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when
I'm using the program I normalize with. I don't have to check to see when
normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to
tell me. I just wait for the processor sound to stop. The same when I'm
copying long files. I don't have to check periodically. If I'm
downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive
sound. I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that
sound any longer. The same for uploads. I can tell when my computer
shuts down because the processor sound stops. I can tell, if I issue the
reboot command when the shutdown has ended. That tells me that the reboot
should be starting because a certain sound is heard.

I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can
hear certain specific sounds during boot up. Others may find other useful
sounds. Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the
user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired? They would be
played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones,
whatever is being used. the function could be toggled on and off.

Gene
--
Pavlov is in the pub enjoying a pint.
The barman rings for last orders, and Pavlov jumps up exclaiming "Damn! I
forgot to feed the dog!"

Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

I expect interesting technical discussions will result from my suggestion as in the below message.  I hope my idea can be adopted and that it will be but I don't know if it is feasible or practical.
 
Gene

------ Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:01 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds

This reminds me of precisely what I used to do in the 1970s with an AM radio
next to a PDP-8 minicomputer.

Reminiscences aside, though, do you think it's possible for NVDA to get this
sort of hardware-level information (and without interfering with it by the
very action of trying to find out what the CPU was doing before NVDA started
finding out what it was doing)?

I also wonder how specific this sort of information is to your design of
motherboard and sound card - another design which has components placed
differently (or better smoothing capacitors on the sound card's power supply
lines) might not be able to detect these fluctuations at all.


Antony.

On Thursday 14 December 2017 at 11:46:06, Gene wrote:

> People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't
> see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many
> sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very
> easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds
> that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently
> available.
>
> Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.
> They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working
> softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to
> get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if
> I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when
> I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when
> normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to
> tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm
> copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm
> downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive
> sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that
> sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer
> shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the
> reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot
> should be starting because a certain sound is heard.
>
> I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can
> hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful
> sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the
> user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be
> played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones,
> whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off.
>
> Gene

--
Pavlov is in the pub enjoying a pint.
The barman rings for last orders, and Pavlov jumps up exclaiming "Damn!  I
forgot to feed the dog!"

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Damien Sykes <damien@...>
 

Hi,
Applications can get hardware level information, I.E. disk and ram access rates, CPU activity etc. Indeed, there is already a standalone program that plays sounds according to the level of access the computer is facing. It’s called Charm, and can be found at dragonapps.org.
I agree that this is something that could be useful to NVDA. Since there is an addon to monitor resource usage, I think it would be amazing to see the sound idea incorporated into that addon.
Cheers.
Damien.
 

From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 11:20 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds
 
I expect interesting technical discussions will result from my suggestion as in the below message.  I hope my idea can be adopted and that it will be but I don't know if it is feasible or practical.
 
Gene
------ Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:01 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds
 
This reminds me of precisely what I used to do in the 1970s with an AM radio
next to a PDP-8 minicomputer.

Reminiscences aside, though, do you think it's possible for NVDA to get this
sort of hardware-level information (and without interfering with it by the
very action of trying to find out what the CPU was doing before NVDA started
finding out what it was doing)?

I also wonder how specific this sort of information is to your design of
motherboard and sound card - another design which has components placed
differently (or better smoothing capacitors on the sound card's power supply
lines) might not be able to detect these fluctuations at all.


Antony.

On Thursday 14 December 2017 at 11:46:06, Gene wrote:

> People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't
> see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many
> sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very
> easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds
> that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently
> available.
>
> Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.
> They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working
> softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to
> get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if
> I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when
> I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when
> normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to
> tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm
> copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm
> downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive
> sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that
> sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer
> shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the
> reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot
> should be starting because a certain sound is heard.
>
> I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can
> hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful
> sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the
> user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be
> played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones,
> whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off.
>
> Gene

--
Pavlov is in the pub enjoying a pint.
The barman rings for last orders, and Pavlov jumps up exclaiming "Damn!  I
forgot to feed the dog!"

                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.



Dan Beaver
 

Gene,


Are you sure the sounds you are hearing are not caused by RFI?(radio frequency interference)  If so I do not think it could be handled by NVDA.


If it is something else then perhaps it might work.


Dan Beaver 


On 12/14/2017 5:46 AM, Gene wrote:
People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Gene
 

I don't know what is being picked up to cause the interference.  It's not changed in volume as I change the level of amplification in the preamp with the volume adjustments which makes me think it's being picked up later.  I don't know if that is at all helpful
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Dan Beaver
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 7:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds

Gene,


Are you sure the sounds you are hearing are not caused by RFI?(radio frequency interference)  If so I do not think it could be handled by NVDA.


If it is something else then perhaps it might work.


Dan Beaver 


On 12/14/2017 5:46 AM, Gene wrote:
People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Well, yes and I needed to get rid onf this problem to allow me to use the computer as an audio source for the hi fi. Inow have an external sound usb device with phono sockets in and out. However I soon discovered that the analogue parts of the device were getting a whining sound all the time, quite low level but annoying.the fix, not completely, but you would need to blow your brain out to hear it, was an isolated powered hub with a bigger than usual mains supply.

Brian

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@ripco.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 10:46 AM
Subject: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds


People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general. That isn't the case. I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.

Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient. They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly. I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful. For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with. I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me. I just wait for the processor sound to stop. The same when I'm copying long files. I don't have to check periodically. If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound. I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer. The same for uploads. I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops. I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended. That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard.

I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up. Others may find other useful sounds. Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired? They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used. the function could be toggled on and off.

Gene


Sarah k Alawami
 

Yes, but no. You can go to, well I dunno now, and buy a dynamic phone patch and amp and plug that in, and make yoru own gismo. I had a friend who did this and I borrowed it to diag a bad drive once. Said friend also knew I was recording when I felt him walk  up to me and touch my recorder. I hear the buzz of data.

On Dec 14, 2017, at 2:46 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


JM Casey <crystallogic@...>
 

Yeah, this is really cool. I think it’s some kind of radio interference. I get a bit of this in my own headphones, and I’d like to get some shielding so it doesn’t happen, mostly because it’s not exactly what I want to hear out of my headphones, but I can still see how it would be useful. Back in the early 90s, I remember using my short-wave radio and tuning in on the frequences my Apple 2 E used. There was no practical reason for this, I just thought the sounds were really cool, and indeed, I could pick out the different sounds for disk access, idling/waiting for keypresses, screen changes, etc.

 

I really have no idea, but I can’t really imagine a programme like nVDA being able to pick up these sounds. I mean wouldn’t you need some kind of receiver?

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: December 14, 2017 5:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds

 

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.

 

Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 

 

I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 

 

Gene


Damien Sykes <damien@...>
 

Hi,
I’m sure Gene will correct me if I’m wrong, but my interpretation of Gene’s message is that, although the sounds heard came directly from the computer, NVDA could utilise a similar system whereby sounds could play in the background and fluctuate depending on the activity of the machine. That would be a possibility. However, you are also correct in saying that the radio signals themselves couldn’t be monitored, amplified or indeed even recognised by NVDA, as that’s an audio interference with the hardware rather than an intended sound in its own right.
Cheers.
Damien.
 

From: JM Casey
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 8:37 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds
 

Yeah, this is really cool. I think it’s some kind of radio interference. I get a bit of this in my own headphones, and I’d like to get some shielding so it doesn’t happen, mostly because it’s not exactly what I want to hear out of my headphones, but I can still see how it would be useful. Back in the early 90s, I remember using my short-wave radio and tuning in on the frequences my Apple 2 E used. There was no practical reason for this, I just thought the sounds were really cool, and indeed, I could pick out the different sounds for disk access, idling/waiting for keypresses, screen changes, etc.

 

I really have no idea, but I can’t really imagine a programme like nVDA being able to pick up these sounds. I mean wouldn’t you need some kind of receiver?

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: December 14, 2017 5:46 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds

 

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.

 

Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 

 

I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 

 

Gene


Lino Morales <linomorales001@...>
 

Well this sounds like a good idea espically if you a Braille display all of the time.


On 12/14/2017 5:46 AM, Gene wrote:
People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Kwork
 

Yes, very. While not at all necessary to enjoy life, and not something I would complain about if never implemented, it sounds like something I would use. I have had headphones where I've heard the sounds Gene has described.
Travis

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 3:48 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds

This seriously sounds like an amazing idea. 

Devin Prater
Assistive Technology instructor in training, JAWS Sertified.

On Dec 14, 2017, at 4:46 AM, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes I hate being able to even hear a hard drive noise on the audio, it shows poor design to my mind.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Sarah k Alawami" <marrie12@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 6:16 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds


Yes, but no. You can go to, well I dunno now, and buy a dynamic phone patch and amp and plug that in, and make yoru own gismo. I had a friend who did this and I borrowed it to diag a bad drive once. Said friend also knew I was recording when I felt him walk up to me and touch my recorder. I hear the buzz of data.

On Dec 14, 2017, at 2:46 AM, Gene <gsasner@ripco.com> wrote:

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general. That isn't the case. I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.

Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient. They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly. I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful. For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with. I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me. I just wait for the processor sound to stop. The same when I'm copying long files. I don't have to check periodically. If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound. I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer. The same for uploads. I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops. I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended. That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard.

I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up. Others may find other useful sounds. Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired? They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used. the function could be toggled on and off.

Gene


Howard Traxler <howard@...>
 

Gene, I know what you meant about (mostly un-noticed)sounds.  They do, however, usually need some interpretation; which you can work out if necessary. 
 
Back in the '90s I was sometimes called upon to troubleshoot a computer that appeared not to be working.  I used a cheap and small portable A M radio.  Placed in the computer, somewhere near the CPU and tuned to a spot on the dial that produced the most noise from the computer, I could get the same types of sounds you are getting from your headphones.  It was very helpful.
 
Howard
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 4:46 AM
Subject: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds

People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general.  That isn't the case.  I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.
 
Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient.  They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly.  I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful.  For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with.  I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me.  I just wait for the processor sound to stop.  The same when I'm copying long files.  I don't have to check periodically.  If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound.  I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer.  The same for uploads.  I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops.  I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended.  That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard. 
 
I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up.  Others may find other useful sounds.  Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired?  They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used.  the function could be toggled on and off. 
 
Gene


Brian's Mail list account <bglists@...>
 

Yes this can be done, indeed often a radio just near the computer is enough.
Brian

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Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
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----- Original Message -----
From: "Howard Traxler" <howard@traxlerenterprises.com>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, December 15, 2017 2:40 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds


Gene, I know what you meant about (mostly un-noticed)sounds. They do, however, usually need some interpretation; which you can work out if necessary.

Back in the '90s I was sometimes called upon to troubleshoot a computer that appeared not to be working. I used a cheap and small portable A M radio. Placed in the computer, somewhere near the CPU and tuned to a spot on the dial that produced the most noise from the computer, I could get the same types of sounds you are getting from your headphones. It was very helpful.

Howard

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 14, 2017 4:46 AM
Subject: [nvda] An unusual but potentially very useful idea about sounds


People who have followed my comments about sounds may believe that I don't see much use in sounds in general. That isn't the case. I think many sounds people rely on don't give much useful information or duplicate very easily gotten information already available but here is an idea for sounds that give unavailable information or information that is not conveniently available.

Awhile ago, I got a new set of headphones that are unusually efficient. They are so efficient that I can hear the sounds of the processor working softly. I was initially going to buy an adapter with a volume control to get rid of the sounds but I found that they were useful. For example, if I am normalizing a file, the processor makes a certain kind of sound when I'm using the program I normalize with. I don't have to check to see when normalization is finished nor do I need a specific sound, nonexistent, to tell me. I just wait for the processor sound to stop. The same when I'm copying long files. I don't have to check periodically. If I'm downloading something, again, my processor makes a certain repetetive sound. I know when the download has finished by simply not hearing that sound any longer. The same for uploads. I can tell when my computer shuts down because the processor sound stops. I can tell, if I issue the reboot command when the shutdown has ended. That tells me that the reboot should be starting because a certain sound is heard.

I can tell my computer is rebooting and hasn't gotten stuck because I can hear certain specific sounds during boot up. Others may find other useful sounds. Should there be a feature in NVDA or an add on that allows the user to hear such sounds, properly amplified, when desired? They would be played through the sound card and heard over speakers or headphones, whatever is being used. the function could be toggled on and off.

Gene