Screen Dimming and Battery Saving


Bhavya shah
 

Dear all,

I am using NVDA 2020.4 Beta 2 on Windows 10, and I am looking to
maximize my laptop's battery life, and as a blind person, I would like
to save on the power that the display monitor uses. There are three
ways (not necessarily mutually exclusive) that I know that help in
screen dimming:
* reducing brightness level from from Settings to 0
* enabling NVDA's screen curtain
* pressing Windows+P and selecting Second screen only
For each of these, could you please comment on whether or not they
help extend battery life and explain why? Are there other ways to save
on display power that I have missed?

I would truly appreciate any assistance.

Thanks.

--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah
Stanford University | Class of 2024
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bhavyashah125/


 

Hi,
Of these, dimming the screen is most effective - you can't really project your screen onto another monitor unless you have a different monitor connected or using older Windows releases, and screen curtain doesn't dim the screen - it makes the screen go black but doesn't change brightness.
A more effective solution is tweaking power plan settings:
* Make the CPU (processor) go a bit slower.
* Enable power saving mode for the wireless card.
* Tell Windows to turn off the display after a shorter amount of time.
Also, don't use a lot of processor-intensive programs in the background.
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bhavya shah
Sent: Saturday, January 2, 2021 11:04 AM
To: nvda <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] Screen Dimming and Battery Saving

Dear all,

I am using NVDA 2020.4 Beta 2 on Windows 10, and I am looking to maximize my laptop's battery life, and as a blind person, I would like to save on the power that the display monitor uses. There are three ways (not necessarily mutually exclusive) that I know that help in screen dimming:
* reducing brightness level from from Settings to 0
* enabling NVDA's screen curtain
* pressing Windows+P and selecting Second screen only For each of these, could you please comment on whether or not they help extend battery life and explain why? Are there other ways to save on display power that I have missed?

I would truly appreciate any assistance.

Thanks.

--
Best Regards
Bhavya Shah
Stanford University | Class of 2024
E-mail Address: bhavya.shah125@gmail.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bhavyashah125/


 

Your last choice should not work, or at least didn't the last time I tried it, because Windows has "gotten smart" and if a second screen is not detected for actual use, it reverts to the primary screen.

As to the other two, it really depends on how the screen in a given machine handles things.  For some reducing brightness does not really change anything in regard to the backlighting, which is what eats up a lot of power.  I think the same is true of screen curtain functions, at least to an extent.  They have to be dependent on how hardware handles things.

It is definitely possible, though I cannot say that it's a good idea, to disable your monitor/display from within Device Manager.  I won't even try it because I don't want to take the slightest chance that I'd end up in a position where I have no display nor the requisite skill to turn it back on very quickly using the screen reader once it's off.  Someone else here should be able to comment about whether this approach works and whether it's advisable or not.  Were you to do it, and were the result persistent between boot cycles, you would have to go back in to Device Manager to re-enable the monitor if it were to be needed for sighted assistance.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

The depths of denial one can be pushed to by outside forces of disapproval can make you not even recognize yourself to yourself.

       ~ Brian Vogel