Topics

FW: Chrome updates


Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

David,

As you are so familiar with Chrome, I wonder if you can tell me how to check the latest version and whether my copy is fully updated? I tried to read the !About! screen using NVDA 2016.1 but the screen just appears blank.


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:49 PM
To: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Subject: Re: Chrome tutorial

Hi Cearbhall,

Many thanks for the tutorial. I have now removed it from the Open Office folder.
I am now experimenting with Chrome. I am sending you this mail from the gmail basic html system in Google Chrome. It seems pretty good so far.

Incidentally, do you know how to check the current version of Google Chrome? Does it update automatically? I am just wondering how it is accessible now and did not seem to be when I installed it.

Best regards,
Ronan
Ronan

On 29/03/2016, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:
Ronan,

As your message landnd in my junk oflder I am just sending you this
reminder that I have placed the tutorial in DropBox Open Office
folder. I hope you still share it!


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing
emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 8:48 PM
To: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie
Subject: Chrome

Hi Cearbhall,
I tried Chrome and to my surprise, it worked .

Would you have a copy of the tutorial you mentioned?

Many thanks,
Ronan


Jeffrey Shockley
 

Hi,
When trying to read the About screen, quitting and relaunching NVDA will let you see it. This is also the page where you update Chrome. Just look under where it has the version listed, and it will tell you whether it is updating or is up to date.
Hope this helps,
Jeffrey

On Mar 30, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:

David,

As you are so familiar with Chrome, I wonder if you can tell me how to check the latest version and whether my copy is fully updated? I tried to read the !About! screen using NVDA 2016.1 but the screen just appears blank.


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:49 PM
To: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Subject: Re: Chrome tutorial

Hi Cearbhall,

Many thanks for the tutorial. I have now removed it from the Open Office folder.
I am now experimenting with Chrome. I am sending you this mail from the gmail basic html system in Google Chrome. It seems pretty good so far.

Incidentally, do you know how to check the current version of Google Chrome? Does it update automatically? I am just wondering how it is accessible now and did not seem to be when I installed it.

Best regards,
Ronan
Ronan

On 29/03/2016, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:
Ronan,

As your message landnd in my junk oflder I am just sending you this
reminder that I have placed the tutorial in DropBox Open Office
folder. I hope you still share it!


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing
emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 8:48 PM
To: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie
Subject: Chrome

Hi Cearbhall,
I tried Chrome and to my surprise, it worked .

Would you have a copy of the tutorial you mentioned?

Many thanks,
Ronan




Kevin Chao
 

Updates automagically. In Omnibar, type: chrome://version

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 8:04 AM Jeffrey Shockley <jawswizard@...> wrote:
Hi,
When trying to read the About screen, quitting and relaunching NVDA will let you see it. This is also the page where you update Chrome. Just look under where it has the version listed, and it will tell you whether it is updating or is up to date.
Hope this helps,
Jeffrey
> On Mar 30, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@...> wrote:
>
> David,
>
> As you are so familiar with Chrome, I wonder if you can tell me how to check the latest version and whether my copy is fully updated? I tried to read the !About! screen using NVDA 2016.1 but the screen just appears blank.
>
>
> All the best,
>
> Cearbhall
>
> m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...
>
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails.
> Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@...]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:49 PM
> To: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
> Subject: Re: Chrome tutorial
>
> Hi Cearbhall,
>
> Many thanks for the tutorial. I have now removed it from the Open Office folder.
> I am now experimenting with Chrome. I am sending you this mail from the gmail basic html  system in Google Chrome. It seems pretty good so far.
>
> Incidentally, do you know how to check the current version of Google Chrome? Does it update automatically?  I am just wondering how it is accessible now and did not seem to be when I installed it.
>
> Best regards,
> Ronan
> Ronan
>
> On 29/03/2016, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@...> wrote:
>> Ronan,
>>
>> As your message landnd in my junk oflder I am just sending you this
>> reminder that I have placed the tutorial in DropBox Open Office
>> folder. I hope you still share it!
>>
>>
>> All the best,
>>
>> Cearbhall
>>
>> m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
>> cearbhall.omeadhra@...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>> ----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
>> The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing
>> emails.
>> Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@...]
>> Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 8:48 PM
>> To: cearbhall.omeadhra@...
>> Subject: Chrome
>>
>> Hi Cearbhall,
>> I tried Chrome and to my surprise, it worked  .
>>
>> Would you have a copy of the tutorial you mentioned?
>>
>> Many thanks,
>> Ronan
>>
>>
>
>
>
>





Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

Thanks, Jeffrey,

That does the trick!


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----
I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional
version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeffrey Shockley [mailto:jawswizard@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 4:04 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

Hi,
When trying to read the About screen, quitting and relaunching NVDA will let
you see it. This is also the page where you update Chrome. Just look under
where it has the version listed, and it will tell you whether it is updating
or is up to date.
Hope this helps,
Jeffrey
On Mar 30, 2016, at 11:00 AM, Cearbhall O'Meadhra
<cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:

David,

As you are so familiar with Chrome, I wonder if you can tell me how to
check the latest version and whether my copy is fully updated? I tried to
read the !About! screen using NVDA 2016.1 but the screen just appears blank.


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:49 PM
To: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Subject: Re: Chrome tutorial

Hi Cearbhall,

Many thanks for the tutorial. I have now removed it from the Open Office
folder.
I am now experimenting with Chrome. I am sending you this mail from the
gmail basic html system in Google Chrome. It seems pretty good so far.

Incidentally, do you know how to check the current version of Google
Chrome? Does it update automatically? I am just wondering how it is
accessible now and did not seem to be when I installed it.

Best regards,
Ronan
Ronan

On 29/03/2016, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:
Ronan,

As your message landnd in my junk oflder I am just sending you this
reminder that I have placed the tutorial in DropBox Open Office
folder. I hope you still share it!


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




---------------------------------------------------------------------
-
----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing
emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 8:48 PM
To: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie
Subject: Chrome

Hi Cearbhall,
I tried Chrome and to my surprise, it worked .

Would you have a copy of the tutorial you mentioned?

Many thanks,
Ronan




David Moore
 

Hi,
You need to have the OCR add on for NVDA installed. You need to OCR the about page and then I read that I have version 49 and it is up to date. That add on is easy to find and install. Have a great one.

-----Original Message-----
From: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 11:00 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

David,

As you are so familiar with Chrome, I wonder if you can tell me how to check the latest version and whether my copy is fully updated? I tried to read the !About! screen using NVDA 2016.1 but the screen just appears blank.


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 2:49 PM
To: Cearbhall O'Meadhra
Subject: Re: Chrome tutorial

Hi Cearbhall,

Many thanks for the tutorial. I have now removed it from the Open Office folder.
I am now experimenting with Chrome. I am sending you this mail from the gmail basic html system in Google Chrome. It seems pretty good so far.

Incidentally, do you know how to check the current version of Google Chrome? Does it update automatically? I am just wondering how it is accessible now and did not seem to be when I installed it.

Best regards,
Ronan
Ronan

On 29/03/2016, Cearbhall O'Meadhra <cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie> wrote:
Ronan,

As your message landnd in my junk oflder I am just sending you this
reminder that I have placed the tutorial in DropBox Open Office
folder. I hope you still share it!


All the best,

Cearbhall

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e:
cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie




----------------------------------------------------------------------
----------- I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam.
The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing
emails.
Try Spam Reader (http://www.spam-reader.com) for free now!

-----Original Message-----
From: Ronan McGuirk [mailto:ronan.p.mcguirk@gmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2016 8:48 PM
To: cearbhall.omeadhra@blbc.ie
Subject: Chrome

Hi Cearbhall,
I tried Chrome and to my surprise, it worked .

Would you have a copy of the tutorial you mentioned?

Many thanks,
Ronan


 

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian


Ben J. Bloomgren
 

it sounds like Chrome updates like Firefox.

Ben

On Mar 30, 2016, at 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:15 pm, Ben J. Bloomgren <bbloomgren@...> wrote:
it sounds like Chrome updates like Firefox.

That's true.  Both constantly monitor for updates and apply them without user intervention.  There are occasions where Chrome, in particular, applies the update but requires a restart of Chrome for it to take effect.

Both are "low to no maintenance" programs and both now make it quite difficult to hold on to outdated versions.  Keeping outdated web browsers is generally not a good idea.

Brian

P.S.  I just updated Chrome and the latest is Version 49.0.2623.110 m



Gene
 

Chrome doesn't allow you not to update whereas Firefox allows you to turn off updates or to be prompted and accept or not.  That is a significant difference.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 6:15 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

it sounds like Chrome updates like Firefox.

Ben
On Mar 30, 2016, at 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Brian,

I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy. Thanks for bringing this point up.

Rosemarie

On 3/30/2016 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:38 pm, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
Chrome doesn't allow you not to update whereas Firefox allows you to turn off updates or to be prompted and accept or not.  That is a significant difference.

 Absolutely, and I prefer the Firefox approach.  Firefox is, however, configured just like Chrome - automatically update - unless you know how to change that setting.  Your average user does not, and that's just what the folks at Firefox are relying on.

While there are legitimate reasons to postpone updates, one should not indulge in that urge for too long when the program interacts on a regular basis with the web at large.

Brian



 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:58 pm, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:
I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy.

It was really, really interesting to me when I started playing with NVDA because, to my knowledge, it is the only screen reader that has the mouse tracking feature and that behaves as NVDA does in response to actual mouse movement.  I understand why, both for practical and historical reasons, the mouse has been a non-entity in the screen-reader-user world.  A good friend of mine refers to it as "the rodent," which I've always found extremely amusing.

But, with the advent of touch screens, where the finger is acting as a direct "mouse pointer" it's clear to me that the concepts that NVDA is using with mouse tracking will map, but in a very functional way, to finger travel on the touch screen.  My clients who use smartphones don't find it peculiar at all to use the touch screen with their finger even though they can't see it, because the finger position covers the actual screen territory.  With a mouse pad there's a "smaller to larger" mapping that's not directly intuitive and you can (and do) fall off the edge and sometimes re-emerge on the other if you go to far.  That's even worse with a conventional mouse and monitor.  The correspondence between a touch screen and "finger pointer" is more direct, tactile, and visceral.

I foresee the use of "mouse tracking" as applied to finger pointing as having huge potential to allow a person to explore a screen quickly, and at random locations, should they wish to do so.  There's a huge power in that and it's not being tapped on a routine basis as things stand now.

Brian



Gene
 

Here is something interesting about NVDA not seeing most of the About screen. Someone, I believe on this list, reported today that if they unload NVDA and then reload it, they can read the screen.  I tried it and it works.  Evidently, Chrome isn't loading almost all of the about page when the page loads normally.  I have no idea why exiting and running NVDA again loads the page properly.  I'm not sure what the physical mouse is doing.  I don't have one and I can't experiment.  But it sounds from your discussion as though the physical mouse is reading the actual web page and not from the MSAA buffer.  That's interesting and it implies that the physical mouse never accesses the MSAA buffer but always works directly with the page.  
 
I realize that the Chrome browser is not working properly with this page but this topic may help developers and NVDA users work with web pages under unusual circumstances.  I have never had this happen before that I know of with any web page but in future, I'll keep the option of exiting an running NVDA in mind if I see something that looks like it may be the same problem.  That is, where I expect a page to load but I see nothing or almost nothing.  At rare times, unloading and loading NVDA may help and I may try it, on rare occasions.  I may also buy a physical mouse because it might be interesting to play with it at times when trying to deal with an accessibility problem and other methods don't work.
 
Gene  
 


Gene
 

one thing that I have never seen discussed is whether the physical mouse can be used by a blind person with NVDA on a web page where some problem exists that prevents Flash from being worked with.  I haven't used a physical mouse and I don't know if NVDA can see Flash controls when working with it.
 
I've seen it stated that some links can only be clicked with a physical mouse and for some reason, are coded not to work from the keyboard.  I expect this is nothing more than bad coding and design and I have either never or almost never come across such links but that's another interesting aspect of the discussion.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 6:58 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

Hi, Brian,

I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy. Thanks for bringing this point up.

Rosemarie
On 3/30/2016 4:13 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian



Gene
 

Perhaps someone with the technical knowledge might explain why the JAWS cursor or the Window-eyes mouse pointer seems to be different than working with an actual physical mouse.  As I understand it, when you move the JAWS cursor or the Window-eyes mouse pointer, you are actually moving whatever the physical mouse moves internally.  I don't know enough to know how to express that accurately.  But it appears there are times you can get information with the physical mouse and NVDA that you can't get with the JAWS or Window-eyes mouse movement commands. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, March 30, 2016 7:27 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 04:58 pm, Rosemarie Chavarria <knitqueen2007@...> wrote:
I think I remember having to do a slow glide with the mouse one time but I don't recall what I was trying to find. There are times when a physical mouse does come in handy.

It was really, really interesting to me when I started playing with NVDA because, to my knowledge, it is the only screen reader that has the mouse tracking feature and that behaves as NVDA does in response to actual mouse movement.  I understand why, both for practical and historical reasons, the mouse has been a non-entity in the screen-reader-user world.  A good friend of mine refers to it as "the rodent," which I've always found extremely amusing.

But, with the advent of touch screens, where the finger is acting as a direct "mouse pointer" it's clear to me that the concepts that NVDA is using with mouse tracking will map, but in a very functional way, to finger travel on the touch screen.  My clients who use smartphones don't find it peculiar at all to use the touch screen with their finger even though they can't see it, because the finger position covers the actual screen territory.  With a mouse pad there's a "smaller to larger" mapping that's not directly intuitive and you can (and do) fall off the edge and sometimes re-emerge on the other if you go to far.  That's even worse with a conventional mouse and monitor.  The correspondence between a touch screen and "finger pointer" is more direct, tactile, and visceral.

I foresee the use of "mouse tracking" as applied to finger pointing as having huge potential to allow a person to explore a screen quickly, and at random locations, should they wish to do so.  There's a huge power in that and it's not being tapped on a routine basis as things stand now.

Brian



Gene
 

It's also worth noting that the same page you work with for the about information in Chrome also is the page used for working with plugins.  If you want to change plugin settings, again, you can't do so as you used to unless you exit NVDA and run it again.
 
I'm not sure if you will have to do the same thing for other items that use that page.  It appears that history opens the same page.
 
Gene


 

On Wed, Mar 30, 2016 at 05:33 pm, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:
one thing that I have never seen discussed is whether the physical mouse can be used by a blind person with NVDA on a web page where some problem exists that prevents Flash from being worked with.  I haven't used a physical mouse and I don't know if NVDA can see Flash controls when working with it.
 
I've seen it stated that some links can only be clicked with a physical mouse and for some reason, are coded not to work from the keyboard.  I expect this is nothing more than bad coding and design and I have either never or almost never come across such links but that's another interesting aspect of the discussion.

Both of these situations are very interesting and worth exploring.  If anyone encounters either situation it would be very useful to post the web address(es) of the pages in question so that direct exploration can commence.

I agree that bad coding and design is responsible for a lot of accessibility (and other) problems.  I'm constantly trying to convince my partner that every problem he has, particular in regard to web browsing, is not necessarily the fault of his "lousy computer" but is equally, if not more, likely to be the fault of the website itself.  There's a lot of GIGO (garbage in, garbage out) code out there.

Brian



Chris Mullins
 

If I press alt+d and type about://version in the Omnibox, I get the following page which I can read with arrow keys:

 

Google Inc.

Copyright 2016 Google Inc. All rights reserved.

Google Chrome:

49.0.2623.110 (Official Build) m(64-bit)

Revision:

575538bc320e213510be1e66f3521382e615129d-refs/branch-heads/2623@{#657}

OS:

Windows

Blink:

537.36 (@575538bc320e213510be1e66f3521382e615129d)

JavaScript:

V84.9.385.33

Flash:

21.0.0.197

User Agent:

Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/49.0.2623.110 Safari/537.36

Command Line:

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe" --flag-switches-begin --flag-switches-end

Executable Path:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe

Profile Path:

C:\Users\Chris\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default

Variations:

b3888d8d-afba0f91

 

 

it continues with more information and I don’t have mouse tracking active.

 

Using W7 with NVDA 2016.1

 

Cheers

Chris

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: 31 March 2016 00:13
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

 

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian


Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

Thanks, Chris, this looks like a good way to get the information. I’ve just tried it myself and it works just as you describe!

 

All the best,

 

Cearbhall

 

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

 

 

 

I use the free version of Spam Reader to get rid of spam. The Professional version doesn't have this disclaimer in outgoing emails. Try Spam Reader for free now!

 

 

From: Chris Mullins [mailto:cjmullins29@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2016 6:17 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

 

If I press alt+d and type about://version in the Omnibox, I get the following page which I can read with arrow keys:

 

Google Inc.

Copyright 2016 Google Inc. All rights reserved.

Google Chrome:

49.0.2623.110 (Official Build) m(64-bit)

Revision:

575538bc320e213510be1e66f3521382e615129d-refs/branch-heads/2623@{#657}

OS:

Windows

Blink:

537.36 (@575538bc320e213510be1e66f3521382e615129d)

JavaScript:

V84.9.385.33

Flash:

21.0.0.197

User Agent:

Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/49.0.2623.110 Safari/537.36

Command Line:

"C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe" --flag-switches-begin --flag-switches-end

Executable Path:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe

Profile Path:

C:\Users\Chris\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default

Variations:

b3888d8d-afba0f91

 

 

it continues with more information and I don’t have mouse tracking active.

 

Using W7 with NVDA 2016.1

 

Cheers

Chris

From: Brian Vogel [mailto:britechguy@...]
Sent: 31 March 2016 00:13
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] FW: Chrome updates

 

Just so people know this, even though NVDA+Down Arrow on the Chrome About page reads only "About Blank" there is other text, including the Version, that NVDA can and does read if you have mouse tracking on (which it is by default) and you glide your mouse pointer about the screen.

I have no idea why NVDA Find cannot find the word Version while a standard CTRL+F find in Chrome itself does.  I've tied playing with the commands to Follow System Caret and Move mouse to current navigator object to see if I could get NVDA to read that way, but I haven't succeeded.

Even if you don't typically use a mouse, if you've got one and are really certain that there must be something on a page you can get a lot of information by doing a slow, orderly "glide over" of the page with the mouse.  Depending on the layout of the page left-to-right working from top to bottom may work best.  For others top-to-bottom working from left to right will work best.  The layout of the Chrome About screen is pretty much a single column, not far from the left, so top to bottom, left to right works reasonably well.  You can always try a "quick and dirty" scan with the mouse until you hear something, anything, announced then getting organized about moving about.

Mouse tracking is one of the NVDA features I really like best because it gives another method to get to information when "the usuals" get cranky.

Brian