right clicking


Don H
 

I want to run powershell admin. To do so I open the start menu and search for powershell. Now I am supposed to right click the result and select run as admin. How do you right click on someing in the start menu?


John Altmeyer
 

Don, I use Windows 10.  Here is how I do what you want.

Hold down the Windows key and press R - this brings up the run dialog.  Type powershell

Next, hold down both the shift and control key and press the enter key.

This will run Powershell as administrator.

John

Be the person your dog thinks you are! – J.W. Stephens

On 02/28/2021 2:35 PM, Don H wrote:
I want to run powershell admin.  To do so I open the start menu and search for powershell.  Now I am supposed to right click the result and select run as admin.  How do you right click on someing in the start menu?





Don H
 

By a happy accident I just figured it out. I opened the start menu, in the search box I typed powershell, first item found was powershell. I then hit the right arrow and got the options to run as admin.

On 2/28/2021 2:12 PM, John Altmeyer wrote:
Don, I use Windows 10.  Here is how I do what you want.
Hold down the Windows key and press R - this brings up the run dialog. Type powershell
Next, hold down both the shift and control key and press the enter key.
This will run Powershell as administrator.
John
Be the person your dog thinks you are! – J.W. Stephens
On 02/28/2021 2:35 PM, Don H wrote:
I want to run powershell admin.  To do so I open the start menu and search for powershell.  Now I am supposed to right click the result and select run as admin.  How do you right click on someing in the start menu?






Pettyjohn, Chris G. (FTC)
 

I know you found a solution.  But if you ever need to right click on anything else in the future you can do NVDA + numpad divide (/)  to move the mouse to the focused item and then NVDA + numpad multiply (*) to execute the right click.  


 

And I will say, again, that while I understand entirely why a screen reader user does not want to use a mouse or mouse pad to move the mouse pointer, I fail to understand the resistance to using the actual left and right click buttons with a prepared mouse or a masked mousepad.

For a regular optical mouse, a piece of electrical tape placed over the laser output prevents it from ever moving the mouse pointer, giving you direct access to real left and right click buttons (and maybe a scroll wheel, depending on the mouse).  Using a small piece of thick-ish cardboard (like what's on the back of most writing pads, or a piece of a file folder) that's taped in place over the trackpad area of a laptop mousepad does exactly the same thing, still giving you access to the real left and right click buttons when you need them.

They're a lot more reliable than any screen reader's emulation of those buttons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


molly the blind tech lover
 

Hi.

I find this topic really interesting, as I am just starting to practice using a mouse in combination with NVDA.

I purchased a wireless mouse, as I needed one for my class.

With NVDA’s mouse tracking feature on, I am getting used to slowly moving the mouse to either right click or left click when I need to.

I am by no means good at using the mouse, but I like knowing it is possible to use the mouse.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, March 1, 2021 11:07 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] right clicking

 

And I will say, again, that while I understand entirely why a screen reader user does not want to use a mouse or mouse pad to move the mouse pointer, I fail to understand the resistance to using the actual left and right click buttons with a prepared mouse or a masked mousepad.

For a regular optical mouse, a piece of electrical tape placed over the laser output prevents it from ever moving the mouse pointer, giving you direct access to real left and right click buttons (and maybe a scroll wheel, depending on the mouse).  Using a small piece of thick-ish cardboard (like what's on the back of most writing pads, or a piece of a file folder) that's taped in place over the trackpad area of a laptop mousepad does exactly the same thing, still giving you access to the real left and right click buttons when you need them.

They're a lot more reliable than any screen reader's emulation of those buttons.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


 

Molly,

          You are the first person I know of who's attempting to do something I've taught my private students in the past.  And you don't use a "prepared mouse" to do that.

           It can be really handy to use the mouse to get a "quick and dirty" overview of a page, sometimes far more rapidly than you can sticking strictly with screen reader commands.

           After having done a "push it to the far left, and then up" to force the mouse to the top left of the screen, then doing a slow (not glacially slow) left to right, top to bottom "waving" of the mouse over the page can get you a lot of information very quickly.  There's a trick to it, but practice makes perfect.  And when you don't want to be actually using the mouse pointer, it's simple to cover that laser port with a piece of tape so you still have your real left and right click buttons available.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Arlene
 

What’s a prepared Mouse? Before I moved to this small town. I had a bigger desk and a wireless mouse. I used it with NVDA Then I clicked whatever I needed.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: March 1, 2021 9:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] right clicking

 

Molly,

          You are the first person I know of who's attempting to do something I've taught my private students in the past.  And you don't use a "prepared mouse" to do that.

           It can be really handy to use the mouse to get a "quick and dirty" overview of a page, sometimes far more rapidly than you can sticking strictly with screen reader commands.

           After having done a "push it to the far left, and then up" to force the mouse to the top left of the screen, then doing a slow (not glacially slow) left to right, top to bottom "waving" of the mouse over the page can get you a lot of information very quickly.  There's a trick to it, but practice makes perfect.  And when you don't want to be actually using the mouse pointer, it's simple to cover that laser port with a piece of tape so you still have your real left and right click buttons available.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 

 


 

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 12:07 PM, Arlene wrote:
What’s a prepared Mouse?
-
Described two messages back:  https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda/message/82242 

This is why I ask that folks read through an entire topic before replying.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

In my case, I've never thought to do that until you pointed it out on this list for the first time a month or so ago. Before that, I had learned that right click usually meant pressing the applications key, and I'm not sure I've ever needed a left click. When I do need help with something such as my problem with browse dialogs from a couple weeks ago, it's because I cannot access the element in question with usual screen reader commands.


Bob Cavanaugh <cavbob1993@...>
 

Oops, inadvertantly deleted the original topic in my email instead of
moving it to the inbox so had to use the web interface, and thought it
was quoting Brian's message asking why people don't use a real mouse
covering the port.

On 3/1/21, Bob Cavanaugh via groups.io <cavbob1993=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
In my case, I've never thought to do that until you pointed it out on this
list for the first time a month or so ago. Before that, I had learned that
right click usually meant pressing the applications key, and I'm not sure
I've ever needed a left click. When I do need help with something such as my
problem with browse dialogs from a couple weeks ago, it's because I cannot
access the element in question with usual screen reader commands.






 

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 01:40 PM, Bob Cavanaugh wrote:
I had learned that right click usually meant pressing the applications key, and I'm not sure I've ever needed a left click.
-
In 99.99999999% of cases, once you have selected something and have focus on it, hitting the menu/applications key is precisely the same as a right click.  You can also reliably use SHIFT+F10, whether or not your keyboard has an applications key.

You would likely very seldom need a left click unless there's some sort of misbehavior with hitting enter to activate.

But I have found the left click and right click emulations for every screen reader I've ever worked with to be hit and miss.  Whereas using their functionality to route the mouse to whatever has screen reader focus, then using an actual left or right click when either is needed, always works.  It's really a matter of suiting what you're doing to a given situation.

I want to make clear that I am not, in any way, discouraging the use of keyboard commands for bringing up the context menu, which is what a right click with a mouse generally does.  But if, for some reason, they don't, there is the very rare occasion where an actual mouse right click does.  I wish I had logged the specific circumstances, but I've had instances where that was the case.  They're admittedly quite rare, but then bugs with the most basic of Windows commands generally are.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Gene
 

There are times on web [pages where a left click must be used because a control isn't coded to work from the keeyboard. there are programs where you need to click but I don't know if that is more than a rather small percent.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, March 01, 2021 3:21 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] right clicking

On Mon, Mar 1, 2021 at 01:40 PM, Bob Cavanaugh wrote:
I had learned that right click usually meant pressing the applications key, and I'm not sure I've ever needed a left click.-
In 99.99999999% of cases, once you have selected something and have focus on it, hitting the menu/applications key is precisely the same as a right click. You can also reliably use SHIFT+F10, whether or not your keyboard has an applications key.

You would likely very seldom need a left click unless there's some sort of misbehavior with hitting enter to activate.

But I have found the left click and right click emulations for every screen reader I've ever worked with to be hit and miss. Whereas using their functionality to route the mouse to whatever has screen reader focus, then using an actual left or right click when either is needed, always works. It's really a matter of suiting what you're doing to a given situation.

I want to make clear that I am not, in any way, discouraging the use of keyboard commands for bringing up the context menu, which is what a right click with a mouse generally does. But if, for some reason, they don't, there is the very rare occasion where an actual mouse right click does. I wish I had logged the specific circumstances, but I've had instances where that was the case. They're admittedly quite rare, but then bugs with the most basic of Windows commands generally are.

--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

~ Anton Chekhov


 

Gene,

          You've given perfect examples are the very rare things I'm thinking about, and it's really handy to have a mouse or mouse pad "prepared for blind use" in those instances.  It can make what is otherwise inaccessible, accessible.  For anyone, in any setting, knowing clever workarounds often makes the difference between frustration and failure and success.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Luke Davis
 

I wonder if Microsoft's mouse keys feature is identical to the right and left click of the mouse, in situations where "any screen reader's emulation" is insufficient?

Just random pondering.

Luke