a possible problem with combo boxes and latest NVDA


Dan Beaver
 

I am running the latest version of NVDA production. I am trying to register for Kovid-19 vaccine on the Kroger.com site.  They use combo boxes to gather some info like the state I live in and the vaccine center I live closest to. 


I am having this issue on both Firefox and Chrome.


When I open the combo boxes and press the letter K for KY it jumps to KS for Kansas.  This is to be expected.  Then it also locks the combo box and will not allow any other movement in the combo box.  I can't move to any other states.  It acts as though I selected KS and then exited from the combo box. 


My sighted wife has tried it with NVDA turned off and it works just fine for her.  She can type a K and sees KS, she can then press K again and it changes to KY.


Other combo boxes work correctly for her as well.


I am currently unable to effectively use any combo boxes.


Any ideas if this is an NVDA issue or something else?


Thanks.



-- 
Dan Beaver (KA4DAN)


 

I can't tell you what the root cause of the issue is, but I'm not having it, provided I arrow in to the combo box options after expanding before I use first letter nav.

In the case of the states listed, once I've arrowed in, using the letter K in that combo box keeps bouncing me between KS and KY.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Andre Fisher
 

Hi.

Have you tried Alt+Down arrow when you've reached the combo box, then pressing Enter on your desired option? Try that and report back.


Dan Beaver
 

Ok, it looks like pressing alt+down arrow opens the combo box and I can move through it using either the cursor or first letter navigation.  I am certain I tried this before but it works now.


If I use either of the other methods it still hoses up though.  This is sure weird.


Thanks.


Dan Beaver

On 3/3/2021 11:05 AM, Andre Fisher wrote:
Hi.

Have you tried Alt+Down arrow when you've reached the combo box, then pressing Enter on your desired option? Try that and report back.
-- 
Dan Beaver (KA4DAN)


Jonathan COHN
 

This is a fairly common issue with folks that don't understand accessibility implications. They have coded the dropdown to perform actions when selection changes. Both JAWS and NVDA along with the browser developers created the alt-down keystroke that opens the list of choices, but doesn't actually "select" any of them until the list is closed again. I have forgotten what the proper event is to use to process the combo box it might be "onChange". 
In summary, if Kroger Web developers slightly change the behaviors of their dropdown it will be a lot easier for keyboard only and screen reader users to use it. On the other hand, the Auto Fill for Chrome and Firefox can often handle selecting the correct state for you in their autofill features.


Jonathan Cohn

On Mar 3, 2021, at 12:08, Dan Beaver <dbeaver888@...> wrote:

Ok, it looks like pressing alt+down arrow opens the combo box and I can move through it using either the cursor or first letter navigation.  I am certain I tried this before but it works now.


If I use either of the other methods it still hoses up though.  This is sure weird.


Thanks.


Dan Beaver

On 3/3/2021 11:05 AM, Andre Fisher wrote:
Hi.

Have you tried Alt+Down arrow when you've reached the combo box, then pressing Enter on your desired option? Try that and report back.
-- 
Dan Beaver (KA4DAN)


 

On Wed, Mar 3, 2021 at 12:58 PM, Jonathan COHN wrote:
In summary, if Kroger Web developers slightly change the behaviors of their dropdown it will be a lot easier for keyboard only and screen reader users to use it.
-
And I thank you for this contribution because it is a direct example of the more general situation where exactly how a web page is coded can have accessibility ramifications that differ between browsers and/or screen readers.

For combo boxes, you'd think that by now there would be The One, True Way of coding them, but there isn't.  And the newer a web object is, and they keep being invented, the less likely it is that any de facto standard for coding exists and different screen readers make different guesses the best they can.

That's why having a secondary screen reader that you're basically familiar with really is a vital tool in the toolbox.  You don't have to be able to be as proficient with all aspects as you are with your favorite one, but knowing how to navigate a webpage doesn't entail that level of proficiency, and can sometimes get you out of a jam.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov