nvda remote sound question and working on command line via laptop


mslion
 

Dear all,
Is it possible with the nvda remote add-on to play sound from the
controlled computer to the controlling one? I mean not the nvda sound
but vlc media player for example?
Secondly, I am slowly discovering the world of linux and the
possabilities of a command line. How do I navigate easely throug the
output of a commandline? I am thinking of using something like putty
for ssh access. I know it is possible with the numeric keys but these
are not available on the laptop layout and using the laptop keys makes
it that I need to use two hands to navigate wereas I would prefer one
so I can use the other to monitor braile?
Thanks for the tips.

With kind regards,
Mitchel Snel


Luke Davis
 

On Fri, 12 Mar 2021, mslion wrote:

Secondly, I am slowly discovering the world of linux and the
possabilities of a command line. How do I navigate easely throug the
output of a commandline? I am thinking of using something like putty
Have you looked at just using the included Windows ssh client?
Or WSL?

for ssh access. I know it is possible with the numeric keys but these
are not available on the laptop layout and using the laptop keys makes
it that I need to use two hands to navigate wereas I would prefer one
I am unclear: does your laptop have a numeric keypad, or does it not?
I understand that you are using the laptop layout, but that doesn't mean you don't have a numpad.

Luke


mslion
 

hi,
I have thought about and the client does not matter to me. It is more the way that I can navigate between input and output and putting in command/scripts. I do not have a numpad at all.

Verstuurd vanaf mijn iPhone

Op 12 mrt. 2021 om 12:15 heeft Luke Davis <luke@newanswertech.com> het volgende geschreven:

On Fri, 12 Mar 2021, mslion wrote:

Secondly, I am slowly discovering the world of linux and the
possabilities of a command line. How do I navigate easely throug the
output of a commandline? I am thinking of using something like putty
Have you looked at just using the included Windows ssh client?
Or WSL?

for ssh access. I know it is possible with the numeric keys but these
are not available on the laptop layout and using the laptop keys makes
it that I need to use two hands to navigate wereas I would prefer one
I am unclear: does your laptop have a numeric keypad, or does it not?
I understand that you are using the laptop layout, but that doesn't mean you don't have a numpad.

Luke





Jason Bratcher
 

I can't answer your second question, but I can answer your first one.
NVDARemote Does Not pipe sound from the controlled computer proper, just the speech from the remote side.

--
Jason Bratcher


 

One of the old tricks that I used to use under Unix, and I believe it works under Windows Command Prompt and PowerShell as well, was redirecting the output and error output from my first command in a script to a log file that I knew the name of, and for each subsequent command append redirecting the same (that is, if you need to have a comprehensive history of the entire set of steps logged - if not, then a straight redirect at each step and having notepad open the resulting file immediately afterward makes life much easier.

An example of same, in command prompt, using the output of the dir command:

dir > logfile.log 2>&1 && notepad logfile.log

This opens the logfile in notepad automatically after the dir command completes.  But, it does NOT stop continued execution of the bat file.  If you want pauses you need to specifically put those in.  You'd also want to exit notepad after each examination if you were continuing to append, as once something's open in notepad it's not going to auto update in the existing window as you append to it.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov

 


Brian Tew
 

If that method of appending does not append you might try two greater than signs thus:
dir >> logfile.txt


 

You're correct that >> is an append redirect while > is a "wipe out whatever may have been there, if anything, and start afresh" redirect.

I was only addressing the first step in my example.  You're absolutely correct that all subsequent steps where you wanted to retain whatever had been logged previously would need to use the >> as the redirect form.

If you don't want retention then > is what you want to use at any step where you want to start the log from scratch.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Any idiot can face a crisis. It's the day-to-day living that wears you out.

      ~ Anton Chekhov