The location of NVDA dictionaries (or the default dictionary, at the very least)


 

There may be some point in the future where copies of dictionary files are requested by a potential assistant, so I thought it important to discuss this.

Your dictionaries are located in the folder:  %APPDATA%\nvda\speechDicts

If you are in command prompt, you could enter the command:
cd %APPDATA%\nvda\speechDicts
and you would be sitting in the NVDA dictionaries folder.

If you are using File Explorer, and no Windows defaults have been changed for folder locations, the %APPDATA% environment variable expands to C:\Users\{appropriate user designator}\AppData\Roaming.  In my case, on my machine, that's:  C:\Users\brite\AppData\Roaming.   The exact path depends on your Windows 10 user account.

In order to view the %APPDATA% folder using File Explorer you mush have the File Option for Show hidden files and folders turned on.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Gene
 

There should be import and export dictionary commands in the speech dictionary dialog. Saving and sharing dictionaries should be encouraged.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, March 29, 2021 5:02 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] The location of NVDA dictionaries (or the default dictionary, at the very least)

There may be some point in the future where copies of dictionary files are requested by a potential assistant, so I thought it important to discuss this.

Your dictionaries are located in the folder: %APPDATA%\nvda\speechDicts

If you are in command prompt, you could enter the command:
cd %APPDATA%\nvda\speechDicts
and you would be sitting in the NVDA dictionaries folder.

If you are using File Explorer, and no Windows defaults have been changed for folder locations, the %APPDATA% environment variable expands to C:\Users\{appropriate user designator}\AppData\Roaming. In my case, on my machine, that's: C:\Users\brite\AppData\Roaming. The exact path depends on your Windows 10 user account.

In order to view the %APPDATA% folder using File Explorer you mush have the File Option for Show hidden files and folders turned on.
--


Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them. And then you destroy yourself.

~ Richard M. Nixon


Sascha Cowley
 

FYI you can use environment variables in the address bar in windows explorer. The address bar can be accessed with `Alt`+`D` or `Ctrl`+`L`.


 

On Mon, Mar 29, 2021 at 06:57 PM, Gene wrote:
There should be import and export dictionary commands in the speech dictionary dialog.
-
But there aren't, at least none that I can find.  And I'm not disagreeing with your idea, just reporting.

The .dic files are plain text files and you can use Notepad to view them (and edit them, though I would never recommend that, as the built-in editor prevents errors).  But, I do make one exception, and that's if you wanted to take someone else's dictionary and slap it either before your existing dictionary entries or after them.  The way things stand now, the only way I know of to do that is via a select all in the source .dic file, copying, then pasting in the location of your choosing in your own .dic file.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


 

On Mon, Mar 29, 2021 at 07:02 PM, Sascha Cowley wrote:
FYI you can use environment variables in the address bar in windows explorer.
-
Good to know.  I'm being lazy, but do you happen to know whether File Explorer will allow you to view any of what are the normally hidden files or folders if you do use the environment variables to get to them?  I'd suspect not, but don't know, and don't feel like experimenting at this moment or this evening, so I thought I'd ask.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Sascha Cowley
 

I just tried disabling show hidden items and using the address bar to navigate to %appdata%, and it worked fine.

On 2021-03-30 10:13, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Mar 29, 2021 at 07:02 PM, Sascha Cowley wrote:
FYI you can use environment variables in the address bar in windows explorer.
-
Good to know.  I'm being lazy, but do you happen to know whether File Explorer will allow you to view any of what are the normally hidden files or folders if you do use the environment variables to get to them?  I'd suspect not, but don't know, and don't feel like experimenting at this moment or this evening, so I thought I'd ask.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


 

Sascha,

               Thanks much.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Luke Davis
 

On Mon, Mar 29, 2021 at 07:02 PM, Sascha Cowley wrote:
FYI you can use environment variables in the address bar in windows explorer.

And in the run dialog, which is a godsend.