Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?


Dan Beaver
 

Hi,

I am starting to be concerned that AVG is not handling lots of virus hits since my wife's laptop keeps getting infected.

How accessible is Kaspersky with NVDA? It seems to get very good reviews as far as an antivirus tool.

thanks.

Dan Beaver


 

Dan,

            I ask the following not to be snarky, but to gain some clarity:  What is the computer getting infected with? or What has the computer been infected with?

            A great many infections are malware or spyware, not viruses, and these can and do get past many straight antivirus programs.  They should not get past full security suites, except if very new and you're one of the very first people infected before the signatures have been added to the scanning databases for things other than viruses.

Brian


Ron Canazzi
 

It is a great program, but largely inaccessible.

On 4/4/2016 4:53 PM, Dan Beaver wrote:
Hi,

I am starting to be concerned that AVG is not handling lots of virus hits since my wife's laptop keeps getting infected.

How accessible is Kaspersky with NVDA? It seems to get very good reviews as far as an antivirus tool.

thanks.

Dan Beaver


--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


 

The issue about avg, is that it reports false alarms to often.
It was one reason I quit using it.
Accessibility dropped off after 8.0.
The best version being version 6 or 7.
Also while 9 did fix access some what I found the hard drive churning away with some directories for volts and a few other things being made at the top of the treeview and the system was always running something.
Worse, while most programs got through if it was just a double extention or even something it didn't know about it told me I had a trogen or worm, put a name on it, said it was a dangerous file or program but then said it was unknown but was still dangerous even if I knew it was fine.
It could be a linux text file I had created or a program I had compiled myself.
Then it started including its own tuneup suite which sadly has become tuneup utilities fron uniblue which is in the opencandy spyware junk now.
It also installs its own search, toolbars and other malware itself.
Msse on the other hand is still attractive interface wize it also has no added software.
If I could get something that does not shout warnings at me unless it needs to and actually makes sence, has an interface thats good and not going to be bad, has an ok cost and doesn't include malware or extra junk then fine.
I don't mind if it includes adds and such for things that are good but nothing else.

On 5/04/2016 9:00 a.m., Ron Canazzi wrote:
It is a great program, but largely inaccessible.


On 4/4/2016 4:53 PM, Dan Beaver wrote:
Hi,

I am starting to be concerned that AVG is not handling lots of virus
hits since my wife's laptop keeps getting infected.

How accessible is Kaspersky with NVDA? It seems to get very good
reviews as far as an antivirus tool.

thanks.

Dan Beaver




 

its a pitty kaspersky is not accessible at all.

On 5/04/2016 9:00 a.m., Ron Canazzi wrote:
It is a great program, but largely inaccessible.


On 4/4/2016 4:53 PM, Dan Beaver wrote:
Hi,

I am starting to be concerned that AVG is not handling lots of virus
hits since my wife's laptop keeps getting infected.

How accessible is Kaspersky with NVDA? It seems to get very good
reviews as far as an antivirus tool.

thanks.

Dan Beaver




 

Try sophos home. It's good, and for the most part, is very accessible
and quiet. You can get it here. It's free fro home use. You can put it
on up to ten machines.

https://www.sophos.com/en-us/lp/sophos-home.aspx

On 4/4/2016 6:03 PM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
its a pitty kaspersky is not accessible at all.



On 5/04/2016 9:00 a.m., Ron Canazzi wrote:
It is a great program, but largely inaccessible.


On 4/4/2016 4:53 PM, Dan Beaver wrote:
Hi,

I am starting to be concerned that AVG is not handling lots of virus
hits since my wife's laptop keeps getting infected.

How accessible is Kaspersky with NVDA? It seems to get very good
reviews as far as an antivirus tool.

thanks.

Dan Beaver





Dan Beaver
 

Hi Brian,

Actually I misspoke.  The laptop is getting a few viruses but mostly adware and malware type infections.  This is why I was looking at Kaspersky.  It looks like it handles what I expect my wife would run into.

I do not know what the particular infections  it has gotten are called because there have been so many of them over the past year or so.

Thanks.

Dan Beaver

On 4/4/2016 4:59 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Dan,

            I ask the following not to be snarky, but to gain some clarity:  What is the computer getting infected with? or What has the computer been infected with?

            A great many infections are malware or spyware, not viruses, and these can and do get past many straight antivirus programs.  They should not get past full security suites, except if very new and you're one of the very first people infected before the signatures have been added to the scanning databases for things other than viruses.

Brian



 

Give Sophos Home a try. Though I didn't use it myself, a test run using a Windows 7 X64 VMware virtual machine proved it to be accessible with NVDA.


Arianna Sepulveda
 

How does Sophos Home do in independent reviews? AVG used to be all right, but now it's absolutely awful!


Thanks,
Ari

On Apr 4, 2016, at 6:08 PM, Supanut Leepaisomboon <supanut2000@...> wrote:

Give Sophos Home a try. Though I didn't use it myself, a test run using a Windows 7 X64 VMware virtual machine proved it to be accessible with NVDA.


Alexander Masic
 

Avira, got very good reputation from experts, and it's not 100%, but fairly accessible.


Den 2016-04-05 kl. 03:42, skrev Arianna Sepulveda:

How does Sophos Home do in independent reviews? AVG used to be all right, but now it's absolutely awful!


Thanks,
Ari

On Apr 4, 2016, at 6:08 PM, Supanut Leepaisomboon <supanut2000@...> wrote:

Give Sophos Home a try. Though I didn't use it myself, a test run using a Windows 7 X64 VMware virtual machine proved it to be accessible with NVDA.


 

I don't know how Sophos Home performed in reviews, but if it's made by a company that specializes in enterprise-grade antivirus, I bet the home version will be just as good as the enterprise one, in terms of virus detection.


Ron Canazzi
 

As a free anti virus product, I wonder if it is real time or not. Only Avast is free and real time.

On 4/4/2016 10:46 PM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
I don't know how Sophos Home performed in reviews, but if it's made by a company that specializes in enterprise-grade antivirus, I bet the home version will be just as good as the enterprise one, in terms of virus detection.
--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"


 

Hi,

Sophos Home did include realtime protection.


Arianna Sepulveda
 

Sophos Home is getting downloaded!  :D


Thanks,
Ari

On Apr 4, 2016, at 10:41 PM, Supanut Leepaisomboon <supanut2000@...> wrote:

Hi,

Sophos Home did include realtime protection.


Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

I wonder if one of the issues is that she isjust not being careful enough. Sooner or later if you do not take care, you will get something nasty, no matter what security you have on a machine you know.
There are endless guides and faqs on this sort of thing, but as was said, the problem of being one of the first to get something will always be present, which is why I'd advocate reading these guides.

Brian
Most bel

bglists@blueyonder.co.uk
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@blueyonder.co.uk, putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dan Beaver" <dbeaver888@gmail.com>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, April 04, 2016 11:53 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?


Hi Brian,

Actually I misspoke. The laptop is getting a few viruses but mostly
adware and malware type infections. This is why I was looking at
Kaspersky. It looks like it handles what I expect my wife would run into.

I do not know what the particular infections it has gotten are called
because there have been so many of them over the past year or so.

Thanks.

Dan Beaver

On 4/4/2016 4:59 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Dan,

I ask the following not to be snarky, but to gain some
clarity: What is the computer getting infected with? or What has the
computer been infected with?

A great many infections are malware or spyware, not
viruses, and these can and do get past many straight antivirus
programs. They should not get past full security suites, except if
very new and you're one of the very first people infected before the
signatures have been added to the scanning databases for things other
than viruses.

Brian


 

Brian Gaff offered, "I wonder if one of the issues is that she is just not being careful enough. Sooner or later if you do not take care, you will get something nasty, no matter what security you have on a machine you know."

And without any hesitation I second this idea, and it has nothing to do with whether one is blind or not.

The subject of infections and "things being missed" comes up endlessly on forums, and most tech geeks say exactly what Mr. Gaff has said in one way or another.  I have done the same recently, twice, on the JFW Group.  For anyone who might be interested the posts are, Recommendations for anti-virus, and, Forums Question & possible change request.  If you do not engage in good "browsing hygiene" you will get infected, period.  There is no way for antivirus, antimalware, and antispyware programs to be 100% up to date and 100% effective 100% of the time.

Brian


Gene
 

Also, if, as has been said, the files are mostly spyware, while you might get better protection using another antivirus program, you should also add the paid version of Malware Bytes if your wife goes to sites and does things that expose her to malware other than viruses.  But what your wife does to infect her computer would be useful to discuss.  Someone who takes good care to follow safe practices should not be infected with anything serious at all often.  We don't know what your wife is infected with but if she if often infected with more than trivial things like tracking cookies, then she is doing things that open her to infection and that should be discussed. 
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2016 9:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Brian Gaff offered, "I wonder if one of the issues is that she is just not being careful enough. Sooner or later if you do not take care, you will get something nasty, no matter what security you have on a machine you know."

And without any hesitation I second this idea, and it has nothing to do with whether one is blind or not.

The subject of infections and "things being missed" comes up endlessly on forums, and most tech geeks say exactly what Mr. Gaff has said in one way or another.  I have done the same recently, twice, on the JFW Group.  For anyone who might be interested the posts are, Recommendations for anti-virus, and, Forums Question & possible change request.  If you do not engage in good "browsing hygiene" you will get infected, period.  There is no way for antivirus, antimalware, and antispyware programs to be 100% up to date and 100% effective 100% of the time.

Brian


Dan Beaver
 

Hi,

Most of what my wife does on-line is shop on Amazon, New Egg, Tiger Direct and a few other shopping sites.  She does a fair amount on Facebook and our church's website.  Other than that I don't see much that should cause her to get these bad things on her laptop but she does.  I do much of the same kinds of things and I do not seem to get these things at all or at least very very little.

I had her set the A V G  settings the same as what I use and her system still gets these things where I do not.

Thanks.

Dan Beaver

On 4/5/2016 10:58 AM, Gene wrote:
Also, if, as has been said, the files are mostly spyware, while you might get better protection using another antivirus program, you should also add the paid version of Malware Bytes if your wife goes to sites and does things that expose her to malware other than viruses.  But what your wife does to infect her computer would be useful to discuss.  Someone who takes good care to follow safe practices should not be infected with anything serious at all often.  We don't know what your wife is infected with but if she if often infected with more than trivial things like tracking cookies, then she is doing things that open her to infection and that should be discussed. 
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2016 9:37 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Brian Gaff offered, "I wonder if one of the issues is that she is just not being careful enough. Sooner or later if you do not take care, you will get something nasty, no matter what security you have on a machine you know."

And without any hesitation I second this idea, and it has nothing to do with whether one is blind or not.

The subject of infections and "things being missed" comes up endlessly on forums, and most tech geeks say exactly what Mr. Gaff has said in one way or another.  I have done the same recently, twice, on the JFW Group.  For anyone who might be interested the posts are, Recommendations for anti-virus, and, Forums Question & possible change request.  If you do not engage in good "browsing hygiene" you will get infected, period.  There is no way for antivirus, antimalware, and antispyware programs to be 100% up to date and 100% effective 100% of the time.

Brian



 

Dan,

        I preface with the following:  This is not meant to be accusatory, it's meant as a problem-solving step.

        As has been observed several times now, there has to be something that your wife is doing, in some way, whether intentionally or not, that accounts for this difference.  Given the state of antivirus software, and that virtually all of it will scan anything you download before it is placed on your machine where you can access it, these infections are not likely viruses.  Most other types of infections are the direct result of some user action, typically clicking through on unfamiliar links that take you to malicious sites.  If you have ever had an infection, and it was not completely purged, you can end up having this occur again because the malware/spyware itself triggers "click-throughs."

         Part of ultimately solving this problem is going to be figuring out exactly what action has been taken that is triggering it in the first place.  

         I will disagree with Gene, but only slightly, in that I have generally found the free version of Malwarebytes to be completely sufficient for ridding machines of malware, particularly for home users.  It's part of the standard tool suite that I install on new machines when I am setting them up for a client.  I also like Spywareblaster, which is pre-emptive in nature.  I use Malwarebytes mostly "after the fact" when there's an infection.  Spywareblaster keeps your web browsers from being able to access a long list of known malicious sites (among other things).  The free version requires that you manually update the definitions while the paid version (which is not very expensive) will do automatic updating for you.  I cannot speak to whether it's accessible or not.

Brian

Brian


Gene
 

The free version of Malware Bytes doesn't have real time protection.  It doesn't stop a machine from being infected.  It can detect and remove a lot of infections once the machine is infected.  
 
If we can determine and remove the underlying problem, it might be less important to use such a program with real time protection.  It still might be a good idea.
Gene

Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2016 10:33 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Kaspersky antivirus, how accessible?

Dan,

        I preface with the following:  This is not meant to be accusatory, it's meant as a problem-solving step.

        As has been observed several times now, there has to be something that your wife is doing, in some way, whether intentionally or not, that accounts for this difference.  Given the state of antivirus software, and that virtually all of it will scan anything you download before it is placed on your machine where you can access it, these infections are not likely viruses.  Most other types of infections are the direct result of some user action, typically clicking through on unfamiliar links that take you to malicious sites.  If you have ever had an infection, and it was not completely purged, you can end up having this occur again because the malware/spyware itself triggers "click-throughs."

         Part of ultimately solving this problem is going to be figuring out exactly what action has been taken that is triggering it in the first place.  

         I will disagree with Gene, but only slightly, in that I have generally found the free version of Malwarebytes to be completely sufficient for ridding machines of malware, particularly for home users.  It's part of the standard tool suite that I install on new machines when I am setting them up for a client.  I also like Spywareblaster, which is pre-emptive in nature.  I use Malwarebytes mostly "after the fact" when there's an infection.  Spywareblaster keeps your web browsers from being able to access a long list of known malicious sites (among other things).  The free version requires that you manually update the definitions while the paid version (which is not very expensive) will do automatic updating for you.  I cannot speak to whether it's accessible or not.

Brian

Brian