NVDA and APA Style


Kelly, Kathleen
 

Thank you, I appreciate the advice. 


 

Hi,

I was about to suggest creating a custom profile just for citation review. Until recently it wasn’t possible to create a dedicated shortcut to activate a manual configuration profile (you can do this now), which I think might be the next best thing while using citation software.

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 10:31 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

I don’t use the citation system being discussed but would it be useful to move with the arrow keys and hear such information character by character?

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

From: tim

Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 12:07 PM

Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

Trying slowing down your speech output.

On 5/16/2021 10:28 AM, Kelly, Kathleen wrote:

Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information.


Gene
 

I don’t use the citation system being discussed but would it be useful to move with the arrow keys and hear such information character by character?
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: tim
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 12:07 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style
 

Trying slowing down your speech output.

On 5/16/2021 10:28 AM, Kelly, Kathleen wrote:
Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information.


Sandra Pilz
 

What kind of overload are you trying to minimise?  Is it when you read and reread your paper to edit the text, or is it when you edit the bibliography?


I think using reference software could help with both. I like to use a citation style that creates less verbeage when the text is read back to me. When I am done writing, I can simply change the citation style to whatever I need, for example APA. The Software will then change the in-line citations to the required format. Finally, I have it insert my bibliography at the end of my document. Of course, I still have to check the bibliography and at this point, you might feel there is overload again. I am not sure how you could minimise it at this point.


Also, if your paper is nearly done, it is not really feasible to start using reference software now. But maybe you might try it for your next paper.


Regards


Sandra

Am 16.05.2021 um 16:28 schrieb Kelly, Kathleen:

Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information. 


tim
 

Trying slowing down your speech output.

On 5/16/2021 10:28 AM, Kelly, Kathleen wrote:
Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information. 


Kelly, Kathleen
 

Thank you, however, I am struggling with the auditory overload of NVDA reading all the characters. I cannot process all the information. 


Pranav Lal
 

Hi Kelly,

 

Many thanks for posting Gyles’s instructions. Yes, configuration profiles are the way to go but font and punctuation information does make for information overload.

 

Pranav

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kelly, Kathleen
Sent: Friday, May 14, 2021 7:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

From Giles Turnbull:

 

when I needed to use APA style for the citations and for the
references section of my Masters assignments, I changed the
Punctuation / symbol level to All in the speech settings, and turned
Font Attributes on in the Document Formatting section.

However, I agree that it can be information overload! What I did was
to set up a profile called Formatting where those are the settings.
Then my normal configuration didn't have that level of detail but I
could turn the Formatting profile on when I did need it.

I guess that, if it's too much information even doing it that way,
then your best option would be to turn the Font Attributes on because
you'll need those to make sure that whatever needs to be bold or
itallic is bold or itallic, and then read each reference character by
character so you can hear if there are dashes and commas in the
correct places without having the Punctuation / symbol level set to
All.

A third option that might work for you is simply not to worry about
the bold and itallic aspects until you have finished the References
page. Then go through it line by line, selecting the text where it
needs to be bold or italic, and using the CTRL+b to make it bold, or
CTRL+i to make it itallic. Since NVDA says "Bold on" or "Bold off" and
"Italics on" or "Italics off", you can spend an editting session just
applying the correct formatting.

I did tell my course director that it was difficult for me, not being
able to see the formatting, and I think she told all of the tutors to
not mark me down if I didn't do the referencing section quite right :)

Giles


enes sarıbaş
 

Hi,

You can avoid proofing issues by adding citations to a citation manager like Zotero, which I did.  It will automatically generate a references list in  perfect APA, all you do is to read through and modify intext citations.

On 5/13/2021 8:27 PM, Pranav Lal wrote:

Giles,

 

I am interested in your response. I need to produce  perfect documents so please post it here.

 

Pranav

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 6:54 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

Hi Kathleen,

just to let you know, I replied to your question in the chat group because I saw it there before my main group digest arrived. I told you what I did when I needed to use APA style (I actually had the choice of APA or Chiago) when I did an MA in creative writing in the 2018/19 academic year. Let me know if you have any difficulty finding that :)

Giles


Kelly, Kathleen
 

Thank you, I appreciate your help. 


Sandra Pilz
 

Hi,


I am not sure if I understand your question right. If you are asking what you could do to make sure your APA citations are formatted correctly, I would recommend that you use citation software.


I have started to use Zotero a few months ago and it makes things so much easier. Since APA is very widely used, probably the bibliography it creates will be fine, provided you enter your sources correctly in Zotero. There may be a bit of a learning curve, but I think its absolutely worth it.


the only thing I wished would be more accessible is copying and moving sources from one collection to another. You have to use drag and drop to do that. If you search the NVDA list archives, there was a discussion on Zotero where someone described which setting to change in Zotero so that the Woord plugin becomes accessible.



Regards


Sandra



Am 13.05.2021 um 05:37 schrieb Kelly, Kathleen:

GS seeks feedback on NVDA and APA Style, the writing/format citation style used in academic papers. I have turned on all the punctuation functions to get NVDA to read the parentheses, periods, and italics, etc. but it is creating an auditory overload. Ideas? Thanks. 


Louise Pfau
 

I always did the in-line citations while writing the paper, and the reference page at the end.  I was taught to do the formatting correctly, so I had to check character by character.
 
Louise


Kelly, Kathleen
 

From Giles Turnbull:

when I needed to use APA style for the citations and for the
references section of my Masters assignments, I changed the
Punctuation / symbol level to All in the speech settings, and turned
Font Attributes on in the Document Formatting section.

However, I agree that it can be information overload! What I did was
to set up a profile called Formatting where those are the settings.
Then my normal configuration didn't have that level of detail but I
could turn the Formatting profile on when I did need it.

I guess that, if it's too much information even doing it that way,
then your best option would be to turn the Font Attributes on because
you'll need those to make sure that whatever needs to be bold or
itallic is bold or itallic, and then read each reference character by
character so you can hear if there are dashes and commas in the
correct places without having the Punctuation / symbol level set to
All.

A third option that might work for you is simply not to worry about
the bold and itallic aspects until you have finished the References
page. Then go through it line by line, selecting the text where it
needs to be bold or italic, and using the CTRL+b to make it bold, or
CTRL+i to make it itallic. Since NVDA says "Bold on" or "Bold off" and
"Italics on" or "Italics off", you can spend an editting session just
applying the correct formatting.

I did tell my course director that it was difficult for me, not being
able to see the formatting, and I think she told all of the tutors to
not mark me down if I didn't do the referencing section quite right :)

Giles


Pranav Lal
 

Giles,

 

I am interested in your response. I need to produce  perfect documents so please post it here.

 

Pranav

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 6:54 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

Hi Kathleen,

just to let you know, I replied to your question in the chat group because I saw it there before my main group digest arrived. I told you what I did when I needed to use APA style (I actually had the choice of APA or Chiago) when I did an MA in creative writing in the 2018/19 academic year. Let me know if you have any difficulty finding that :)

Giles


Kelly, Kathleen
 

Thank you, I appreciate your help. 


 

Hi,

I usually don’t worry about citation styles until before submitting papers – I just type in-line citations (author, year) as I write papers, and then I go back and reformat it to resemble whatever style the instructor wants as I’m finishing my paper (I also take care of spelling and grammar at that time, too).

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Louise Pfau
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 12:25 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

I didn’t know about the APA checker software, but I think  the professors wouldn’t have wanted us to use it anyway.  When I had to write psychology papers about 15 years ago, I proofed them using the JAWS “Check formatting” command.  I didn’t know about NVDA at the time, and I think it might have been developed around the time I graduated.  The university library had an online reference guide for the most common citation styles, but I don’t know if it still exists.

 

Louise


Louise Pfau
 

I didn’t know about the APA checker software, but I think  the professors wouldn’t have wanted us to use it anyway.  When I had to write psychology papers about 15 years ago, I proofed them using the JAWS “Check formatting” command.  I didn’t know about NVDA at the time, and I think it might have been developed around the time I graduated.  The university library had an online reference guide for the most common citation styles, but I don’t know if it still exists.
 
Louise


 

Kathleen,

Also consider using APA Style checker software, which flags obvious errors.  I haven't had to write a paper in APA Style in 20 years now, but these were very useful when I did for catching "small errors" I might not otherwise have caught after reading and re-reading and re-reading until I was practically numb.

See:  https://duckduckgo.com/?q=apa+style+checker

I can't speak to accessibility for any of them, so that would be one of your jobs to determine which one or ones might be accessible.  But as a graduate student finding one that is could make your life much easier.

Also, a more general recommendation (that I know is sometimes hard to follow):  Try to write your papers far enough ahead of time that you can walk away from them for a few days (at a minimum) to over a week before going back and proofing them.  It makes it so much easier to see errors.  When in the heat of writing it's just so easy to see "what I meant to write" rather than "what I actually wrote" in many cases.  Mental "auto-correct" has amazing power when you're actively working on something.  After just a bit of time and distance, that power wanes, and that's a good thing as far as proofing goes.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Giles Turnbull
 

Hi Kathleen,

just to let you know, I replied to your question in the chat group because I saw it there before my main group digest arrived. I told you what I did when I needed to use APA style (I actually had the choice of APA or Chiago) when I did an MA in creative writing in the 2018/19 academic year. Let me know if you have any difficulty finding that :)

Giles


Kelly, Kathleen
 

Thank you for the information. I appreciate it. 


zvonimir stanečić, 9a5dsz
 

Hi!

The only way to deal with this situation is to use the braille display.

I am using the Chicago citation style, which is in my humble opinion more accessible to screen readers.

Best,

Zvonimir

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kelly, Kathleen
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2021 5:38 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and APA Style

 

GS seeks feedback on NVDA and APA Style, the writing/format citation style used in academic papers. I have turned on all the punctuation functions to get NVDA to read the parentheses, periods, and italics, etc. but it is creating an auditory overload. Ideas? Thanks.