Performance/battery life using NVDA in Windows 10/11 arm in Parallels 17 VM on Mac OSX on an M1/Pro/Max Mac?


Mat Mirabella <mat@...>
 

Hi all,

 

As the subject line indicates, for those who have tried this, I was wondering what the impact on performance and also battery life is when using NVDA in this scenario. In particular, when using NVDA/Windows in the VM most of the time. I have seen previous discussions about getting this to work, but not much discussion on performance and impact on the system when using it.

 

I understand that the new M1/Pro/Max systems are arm based, and to use Windows 10/11 on them, the only effective way is to install the arm version of Windows 10/11 pro as a VM  in Parallels (now version 17.1) under Mac-OSX. I understand the performance of Windows is ok, but that because software like NVDA is an x86 application, there is a reliance on Microsoft’s emulation to allow x86/x64 software to run when using the arm version of Windows. This is likely to impact more than just NVDA, but as NVDA has to be always running and is being used all the time, the impact may be greater in terms of the experience than with other applications that can be used once and then closed when not in use.

 

I realise that one of the hurdles for getting a good experience is sorting out the keyboard layout and key mappings. However, assuming this is sorted out, what I wondered was what the performance of using NVDA is like. i.e. is scrolling around the desktop and windows explorer fast or does it lag a bit? what happens in large word documents, web pages in Chrome or PDFs? I am also curious as to whether the very long battery life that people appear to be getting with these M1 macs is shorter in the above NVDA usage scenarios because of all the emulation going on, and if so, by how much. I was also wondering how coherence mode in Parallels works if you are using a screen reader like NVDA on the Windows side and VO on the Mac OSX side.

 

Thanks for any insights.

 

Kind regards.

 

Mat.

 


Greg Wocher
 

Hello,
There is a YouTube channel called techopolis where they did a demonstration of installing Windows 11 arm version using parallel. In this demo they also installed NVDA on it. It seemed to be responsive and work fairly well If you search for the techopolis channel on YouTube you should be able to find the video.

Greg Wocher


On Nov 4, 2021, at 8:23 PM, Mat Mirabella <mat@...> wrote:

Hi all,
 
As the subject line indicates, for those who have tried this, I was wondering what the impact on performance and also battery life is when using NVDA in this scenario. In particular, when using NVDA/Windows in the VM most of the time. I have seen previous discussions about getting this to work, but not much discussion on performance and impact on the system when using it.
 
I understand that the new M1/Pro/Max systems are arm based, and to use Windows 10/11 on them, the only effective way is to install the arm version of Windows 10/11 pro as a VM  in Parallels (now version 17.1) under Mac-OSX. I understand the performance of Windows is ok, but that because software like NVDA is an x86 application, there is a reliance on Microsoft’s emulation to allow x86/x64 software to run when using the arm version of Windows. This is likely to impact more than just NVDA, but as NVDA has to be always running and is being used all the time, the impact may be greater in terms of the experience than with other applications that can be used once and then closed when not in use.
 
I realise that one of the hurdles for getting a good experience is sorting out the keyboard layout and key mappings. However, assuming this is sorted out, what I wondered was what the performance of using NVDA is like. i.e. is scrolling around the desktop and windows explorer fast or does it lag a bit? what happens in large word documents, web pages in Chrome or PDFs? I am also curious as to whether the very long battery life that people appear to be getting with these M1 macs is shorter in the above NVDA usage scenarios because of all the emulation going on, and if so, by how much. I was also wondering how coherence mode in Parallels works if you are using a screen reader like NVDA on the Windows side and VO on the Mac OSX side.
 
Thanks for any insights.
 
Kind regards.
 
Mat.
 


Mat Mirabella <mat@...>
 

Thanks - I could only find this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2_Mt7FmRNc

Is that the one you mean? I don’t think they managed to get quite as far as working with nvda on windows as far as I can tell in that video.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Greg Wocher via groups.io
Sent: Friday, 5 November 2021 9:52 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Performance/battery life using NVDA in Windows 10/11 arm in Parallels 17 VM on Mac OSX on an M1/Pro/Max Mac?

 

Hello,

There is a YouTube channel called techopolis where they did a demonstration of installing Windows 11 arm version using parallel. In this demo they also installed NVDA on it. It seemed to be responsive and work fairly well If you search for the techopolis channel on YouTube you should be able to find the video.

 

Greg Wocher

 



On Nov 4, 2021, at 8:23 PM, Mat Mirabella <mat@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

 

As the subject line indicates, for those who have tried this, I was wondering what the impact on performance and also battery life is when using NVDA in this scenario. In particular, when using NVDA/Windows in the VM most of the time. I have seen previous discussions about getting this to work, but not much discussion on performance and impact on the system when using it.

 

I understand that the new M1/Pro/Max systems are arm based, and to use Windows 10/11 on them, the only effective way is to install the arm version of Windows 10/11 pro as a VM  in Parallels (now version 17.1) under Mac-OSX. I understand the performance of Windows is ok, but that because software like NVDA is an x86 application, there is a reliance on Microsoft’s emulation to allow x86/x64 software to run when using the arm version of Windows. This is likely to impact more than just NVDA, but as NVDA has to be always running and is being used all the time, the impact may be greater in terms of the experience than with other applications that can be used once and then closed when not in use.

 

I realise that one of the hurdles for getting a good experience is sorting out the keyboard layout and key mappings. However, assuming this is sorted out, what I wondered was what the performance of using NVDA is like. i.e. is scrolling around the desktop and windows explorer fast or does it lag a bit? what happens in large word documents, web pages in Chrome or PDFs? I am also curious as to whether the very long battery life that people appear to be getting with these M1 macs is shorter in the above NVDA usage scenarios because of all the emulation going on, and if so, by how much. I was also wondering how coherence mode in Parallels works if you are using a screen reader like NVDA on the Windows side and VO on the Mac OSX side.

 

Thanks for any insights.

 

Kind regards.

 

Mat.

 

 


mattias
 

This channel seems to be gone

 

Skickades från E-post för Windows

 

Från: Greg Wocher
Skickat: den 5 november 2021 11:52
Till: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Ämne: Re: [nvda] Performance/battery life using NVDA in Windows 10/11 arm in Parallels 17 VM on Mac OSX on an M1/Pro/Max Mac?

 

Hello,

There is a YouTube channel called techopolis where they did a demonstration of installing Windows 11 arm version using parallel. In this demo they also installed NVDA on it. It seemed to be responsive and work fairly well If you search for the techopolis channel on YouTube you should be able to find the video.

 

Greg Wocher

 



On Nov 4, 2021, at 8:23 PM, Mat Mirabella <mat@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

 

As the subject line indicates, for those who have tried this, I was wondering what the impact on performance and also battery life is when using NVDA in this scenario. In particular, when using NVDA/Windows in the VM most of the time. I have seen previous discussions about getting this to work, but not much discussion on performance and impact on the system when using it.

 

I understand that the new M1/Pro/Max systems are arm based, and to use Windows 10/11 on them, the only effective way is to install the arm version of Windows 10/11 pro as a VM  in Parallels (now version 17.1) under Mac-OSX. I understand the performance of Windows is ok, but that because software like NVDA is an x86 application, there is a reliance on Microsoft’s emulation to allow x86/x64 software to run when using the arm version of Windows. This is likely to impact more than just NVDA, but as NVDA has to be always running and is being used all the time, the impact may be greater in terms of the experience than with other applications that can be used once and then closed when not in use.

 

I realise that one of the hurdles for getting a good experience is sorting out the keyboard layout and key mappings. However, assuming this is sorted out, what I wondered was what the performance of using NVDA is like. i.e. is scrolling around the desktop and windows explorer fast or does it lag a bit? what happens in large word documents, web pages in Chrome or PDFs? I am also curious as to whether the very long battery life that people appear to be getting with these M1 macs is shorter in the above NVDA usage scenarios because of all the emulation going on, and if so, by how much. I was also wondering how coherence mode in Parallels works if you are using a screen reader like NVDA on the Windows side and VO on the Mac OSX side.

 

Thanks for any insights.

 

Kind regards.

 

Mat.

 

 

 


 

On Sat, Nov 6, 2021 at 08:05 AM, mattias wrote:
This channel seems to be gone
-
No, it's not.  YouTube - Techopolis Channel
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


 

I'm not watching, but might it be this video?  Apple September Event Recap, Windows 11 , And More: Techopolis Live Episode 10
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy