Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA


David Russell
 

Hello Group,
Is it feasible to use the NVDA screen reader to record/produce an audio book?
If so, where can one find a detailed tutorial to guide the process
from recording to self publishing?

Thanks in advance.
--
David C. Russell, Author


Gene
 

I don’t understand the question.  Are you talking about recording an audio file in a recording program and editing it or are you asking about something more? 
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Saturday, November 06, 2021 10:58 AM
Subject: [nvda] Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA
 
Hello Group,
Is it feasible to use the NVDA screen reader to record/produce an audio book?
If so, where can one find a detailed tutorial to guide the process
from recording to self publishing?

Thanks in advance.
--
David C. Russell, Author





Laz
 

No, for several reasons some of which I've listed below:

1. It would have to be done in real time tying up your PC for that
period of time.
2. If this is something you're going to sell, the question as to the
possible legality of using the TTS voices comes to play.

If this were something non-commercial and you're doing for yourself or
for a friend, then I recommend the use of Balabolka instead. It's much
faster than doing it in real time.

If this is for self publishing, you need to read the license of
whatever TTS voice you want to use for this as to what it says about
commercial use.

Stay well,

Laz

On 11/6/21, David Russell <david.sonofhashem@...> wrote:
Hello Group,
Is it feasible to use the NVDA screen reader to record/produce an audio
book?
If so, where can one find a detailed tutorial to guide the process
from recording to self publishing?

Thanks in advance.
--
David C. Russell, Author





--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Player/book Reader, Victor
Reader Stream & Trek, blindshell Classic phone, Bluetooth devices, and
accessories
http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@...
Phone: 727-498-0121
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Sarah k Alawami
 

I know what he wants to do. I would not do this, it will sound horable. I do have scripts and command line knowledge to maybe allow me to to do what you want to do. Contact me off list if you want to know more.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Saturday, November 6, 2021 9:12 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA

 

I don’t understand the question.  Are you talking about recording an audio file in a recording program and editing it or are you asking about something more? 

 

Gene

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Saturday, November 06, 2021 10:58 AM

Subject: [nvda] Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA

 

Hello Group,
Is it feasible to use the NVDA screen reader to record/produce an audio book?
If so, where can one find a detailed tutorial to guide the process
from recording to self publishing?

Thanks in advance.
--
David C. Russell, Author




 

On Sat, Nov 6, 2021 at 12:52 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
I would not do this, it will sound horable.
-
About which we agree.  Those who use screen readers daily should know, very well, the pitfalls with regard to speech synthesizers and the sometimes odd choices they make.

It would likely matter less if we're talking about, say, a textbook, though it would still matter, but if the content is prose you want someone to read it who gets the entire gist of what's going on in said prose.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Actually I voiced a book someone needed once. I could do a chapter in about 30 minutes but the script I had auto converted which was fine. These chapters were about 50 pages in length btw.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Laz
Sent: Saturday, November 6, 2021 9:35 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA

No, for several reasons some of which I've listed below:

1. It would have to be done in real time tying up your PC for that period of time.
2. If this is something you're going to sell, the question as to the possible legality of using the TTS voices comes to play.

If this were something non-commercial and you're doing for yourself or for a friend, then I recommend the use of Balabolka instead. It's much faster than doing it in real time.

If this is for self publishing, you need to read the license of whatever TTS voice you want to use for this as to what it says about commercial use.

Stay well,

Laz

On 11/6/21, David Russell <david.sonofhashem@...> wrote:
Hello Group,
Is it feasible to use the NVDA screen reader to record/produce an
audio book?
If so, where can one find a detailed tutorial to guide the process
from recording to self publishing?

Thanks in advance.
--
David C. Russell, Author






--
Affordably priced Accessible Talking MP3 Player/book Reader, Victor Reader Stream & Trek, blindshell Classic phone, Bluetooth devices, and accessories http://www.talkingmp3players.com/
Email: laz@...
Phone: 727-498-0121
Personal Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/laz.mesa
Facebook: https://m.facebook.com/Talkingmp3players?_rdr


Sarah k Alawami
 

Yeah agreed. I would get a human narrator is at all possible if you cannot, or don’t feel comfortable reading your stuff.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, November 6, 2021 10:25 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA

 

On Sat, Nov 6, 2021 at 12:52 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

I would not do this, it will sound horable.

-
About which we agree.  Those who use screen readers daily should know, very well, the pitfalls with regard to speech synthesizers and the sometimes odd choices they make.

It would likely matter less if we're talking about, say, a textbook, though it would still matter, but if the content is prose you want someone to read it who gets the entire gist of what's going on in said prose.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


Giles Turnbull
 

In theory it is ... sort of! The main concern is the sound of the TTS engine which, as others have mentioned, might not be very pleasant to somebody not used to listening to screen readers. when my poetry pamphlet won a competition and was published in 2017, it was important to me to have an audiobook version in case any visually-impaired people attending my readings and launch events wanted to buy a copy.; I did a reading at Cardiff Institute for the Blind (now Sight Life) in addition to literature festivals in Abergavenny and Torquay, and several launch events around Wales.

I can now memorise between 30 and 45 minutes of my own poems, but at the time of publication I could only manage about 10 minutes. I tried using Orcam glasses to read from the pamphlet or printout, but the result was too variable to risk using it in front of an audience. I decided to use NVDA on a tablet with three small external Cube speakers which provided plenty of volume to fill an area large enough to hold 30-or-so people ... my first event was at Waterloo Tea, a cafe in the wyndham Arcade in Cardiff. I think I did half a dozen poems from memory and used NVDA to do six or seven more.

As others have mentioned, the screen reading software needs a bit of a helping hand. I edited text files of the poems so that NVDA paused where a human reader would pause, even if it made no grammatical sense to have a comma at that place. I use the Microsoft SAPI5 voice Hazel for public audiences, because it sounds very human compared to any other TTS voice I've heard .. I have a little piece that Hazel reads before her last poem, and she always gets applause from the audience :)

On the morning of my first launch event, I was pondering how to get Hazel to say the phrase "power suits" in a less plummy voice though. The problem was that Hazel pronounces suits see-oots. I tried several variations ... the soo sound could be spelled Sue or Soo, but there is no ts sound in English and joining ts to soo produces soots, and attaching it to Sue produces suets (suet ebing the fat surrounding the kidney!) ... I even tried Sioux but again still the same problem because joining ts to Sioux sounds like the original see-oots. Two hours before I set off for the event, I wondered whether changing the consonant from a t might work ... and indeed, writiing suits as Siouxds worked (with the Hazel voice) almost indistinguishable to suits :)

When I produced my audiobook version I paid £100 for half a day of studio time with a an engineer. He micéd me for the poems I did from memory (by this time I culd do 10 poems in the pamphlet from memory) and then he micéd my tablet for Hazel to do the remaining 10. Was it worth doing the audiobook? Financially speaking, no! I have sold two copies of it so far (I sold them at events on USB thumb drives for the same £5 fee for the audiobook ... bearing in mind I buy my copies at 50 percent) so I'm currently about £95 down on my investment in the audiobook ... but it's worth it for me to have done that for the visually-impaired readers :)


JM Casey
 

Interesting discussion here and I appreciate you explaining howy ou did this.

 

I’m sort of jumping in late to this thread – but yes, human narratino is 100% the way to go as far as I’m concerned. I would not listen to a TTS read poetry, personally, unless I absolutely had no choice and was required to study it for school or something. I don’t even like listening to a TTS read good prose. It doesn’t matter how “human-sounding” it is or claims to be, it’s just not what I want from the literary experience. This is why I do all my reading on a braille display n owadays, when possible.

If one can’t narrate themselves, I would say, pay someone to do it, or maybe you have a friend with an awesome voicea nd a good understanding of your work who will help for nothing more than a couple of pints.

 

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Giles Turnbull
Sent: November 7, 2021 11:02 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Self-Produced AudioBook with NVDA

 

In theory it is ... sort of! The main concern is the sound of the TTS engine which, as others have mentioned, might not be very pleasant to somebody not used to listening to screen readers. when my poetry pamphlet won a competition and was published in 2017, it was important to me to have an audiobook version in case any visually-impaired people attending my readings and launch events wanted to buy a copy.; I did a reading at Cardiff Institute for the Blind (now Sight Life) in addition to literature festivals in Abergavenny and Torquay, and several launch events around Wales.

I can now memorise between 30 and 45 minutes of my own poems, but at the time of publication I could only manage about 10 minutes. I tried using Orcam glasses to read from the pamphlet or printout, but the result was too variable to risk using it in front of an audience. I decided to use NVDA on a tablet with three small external Cube speakers which provided plenty of volume to fill an area large enough to hold 30-or-so people ... my first event was at Waterloo Tea, a cafe in the wyndham Arcade in Cardiff. I think I did half a dozen poems from memory and used NVDA to do six or seven more.

As others have mentioned, the screen reading software needs a bit of a helping hand. I edited text files of the poems so that NVDA paused where a human reader would pause, even if it made no grammatical sense to have a comma at that place. I use the Microsoft SAPI5 voice Hazel for public audiences, because it sounds very human compared to any other TTS voice I've heard .. I have a little piece that Hazel reads before her last poem, and she always gets applause from the audience :)

On the morning of my first launch event, I was pondering how to get Hazel to say the phrase "power suits" in a less plummy voice though. The problem was that Hazel pronounces suits see-oots. I tried several variations ... the soo sound could be spelled Sue or Soo, but there is no ts sound in English and joining ts to soo produces soots, and attaching it to Sue produces suets (suet ebing the fat surrounding the kidney!) ... I even tried Sioux but again still the same problem because joining ts to Sioux sounds like the original see-oots. Two hours before I set off for the event, I wondered whether changing the consonant from a t might work ... and indeed, writiing suits as Siouxds worked (with the Hazel voice) almost indistinguishable to suits :)

When I produced my audiobook version I paid £100 for half a day of studio time with a an engineer. He micéd me for the poems I did from memory (by this time I culd do 10 poems in the pamphlet from memory) and then he micéd my tablet for Hazel to do the remaining 10. Was it worth doing the audiobook? Financially speaking, no! I have sold two copies of it so far (I sold them at events on USB thumb drives for the same £5 fee for the audiobook ... bearing in mind I buy my copies at 50 percent) so I'm currently about £95 down on my investment in the audiobook ... but it's worth it for me to have done that for the visually-impaired readers :)


David Russell
 

Hello NVDA,

Thank you everyone for your responses on the feasibility of using NVDA
to self-produce an audio book. Human narrator sounds like the majority
opinion.
Thanks to the author who also shared of his experience in
self-producing an audio book for vision-impaired readers. I would use
the general public as my audience, but know unless one is established,
sales will likely be modest.
I may self-publish and let the eBook - rather than audio book, be the
medium for my authored story collection. If readers are sighted or
blind, their choice of means to read will be theirs alone.
Here in the U.S., my research indicates professional narration can
range from $100.00 USD to $400.00 per hour, USD, U.S. Dollars.

Thus, it seems more practical from an economic standpoint to choose
the non-audio path to publication. So be it. Thanks!

--
David C. Russell, Author