experience sharing: Using NVDA's Gestures to Switch the Touchpad


Rowen Cary
 
Edited

Hi all,

Yes, there was already an inquiry on this topic in this group. I opened a separate thread in order to make this method more visible.

It would undoubtedly be more convenient if the touchpad could be toggled on and off using NVDA's gestures, which we can do anytime, anywhere without having to open settings.

Steps: 1. press windows+R to open the Windows Run dialog;

  1. input the following path: %appdata%\nvda\gestures.ini and press Enter;

  2. If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]

  3. Please press enter at the end of the first line to add a blank line;

  4. Then input the following: kb:windows+control+f24 = kb:control+f4

  5. Press Ctrl+S to save the file and restart nvda in your preferred way;

  6. Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the touchpad.

p.s. If you prefer other gestures you can change control+f4 to your preferred gesture in step 5.

Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left and right function keys.

I hope this useful to you.

Thanks


 

Rowen,

Although I think I know the answer, I need to ask someone who's using this technique to verify:  Does toggling the mousepad off affect only the trackpad portion, or also disable the left/right click hard buttons (if your mousepad uses these) or the "corner rock presses" left and right if these are used?

On mousepads where there are no literal left and right buttons nor does the whole trackpad allow downward pushes on the corners I have to imagine the whole thing would be turned off, but I'm not certain about when there are actual "hard controls" for the mouse button presses.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Constantly insisting on “my rights” with no consideration of “my responsibilities” isn’t “freedom” — it’s adolescence.
     ~ Commenter, Evangelos, in comments for
         America 2022: Where Everyone Has Rights and No One Has Responsibilities,
        New York Times, February 8, 2022

 


Luke Davis
 

Rowen Cary wrote:

If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]
No it isn't, not always.

Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line, and enter your edit below it.

Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the touchpad.
I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off, and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have any effect (to answer Brian's question).
Win 10, 21H2.

Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found. Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect.
Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909).

Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left and right function keys.
Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any laptop had two of those.
Or the control key? Or something else?

Luke


Luke Davis
 

Luke Davis wrote:

The touchpad is turned off, and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have any effect (to answer Brian's question).
Hmpf, upon re-reading it, to not actually answer Brian's question. I only know of one laptop "in the family" with physical buttons, and it will be about 30 miles away for the next week. Someone else will have to test that.

Luke


Gene
 

I don't understand the context of what is being discussed.  Why would NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad?  I see no connection between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader.


Gene

On 3/14/2022 11:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote:

Rowen Cary wrote:

    If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]
No it isn't, not always.

Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line, and enter your edit below it.

    Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the touchpad.
I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off, and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have any effect (to answer Brian's question).
Win 10, 21H2.

Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found. Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect.
Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909).

Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left and right function keys.
Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any laptop had two of those.
Or the control key? Or something else?

Luke





 

On Mon, Mar 14, 2022 at 12:17 PM, Gene wrote:
Why would NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad?  I see no connection between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader.
-
Gene,

Because, apparently, and I did not know this, you can use a feature of NVDA (and probably other screen readers) to map a gesture they control to another keystroke sequence used by Windows to control certain aspects of the hardware you're using.

If NVDA can do it, then it is a function of the screen reader.  It's just not one we think about very often at all because so few know it exists or exploit it.

The original post, as well as a couple of subsequent ones, make entirely clear that what is under discussion is an NVDA feature where some "creative NVDA gesture to system keystroke sequence remapping" is being done under NVDA.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Constantly insisting on “my rights” with no consideration of “my responsibilities” isn’t “freedom” — it’s adolescence.
     ~ Commenter, Evangelos, in comments for
         America 2022: Where Everyone Has Rights and No One Has Responsibilities,
        New York Times, February 8, 2022

 


Jason Bratcher
 

The HP Pavilion DV7 when on Windows disables the entirety of the pad
(including buttons).
The "buttons" in my case are soft because you don't feel them separately from the pad.
My newer HP DQ1038WM also has 'soft buttons'.
An older Toshiba Satellite C855D I used to use has them 'hard' (separate from the pad).
These also turn off if I turn the touch pad off.

--
Jason Bratcher


Jason Bratcher
 

All three laptops I mentioned in my previous message were mostly Windows 10 latest applied update(s).
The DQ1038WM has the unique privilege of being on the latest regular release of Windows 11.--
Jason Bratcher


Rowen Cary
 

Hi Luke,

Thanks Luke for the clarification, it's important, It's my fault, hope your clarification can be seen by more people. I hope this topic is useful to some people, and of course I hope there are more tests to show its feasibility, the provenance of this method is no longer verified, I have to say sorry for this.

"> Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any laptop had" I'm referring to the left/right ctrl, shift/alt/windows keys, currently NVDA can clearly distinguish these keys in keyboard help mode, but the input gesture settings don't allow me to use right ctrl+F4 alone and similar combinations.

Thanks

On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 12:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote:

Rowen Cary wrote:

If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first line of

the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]

No it isn't, not always.

Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line, and enter

your edit below it.

Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the touchpad.

I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off, and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have any effect (to answer

Brian's question). Win 10, 21H2.

Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has a jumbo

touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found. Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect. Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909).

Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left and right function keys.

Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any laptop had

two of those. Or the control key? Or something else?

Luke


Rowen Cary
 

Hi Brian,

On my dell latitude 7490 it only turns off the touchpad and the left and right mouse buttons on the touchpad, not an external mouse. Windows 10 21H2 (x64) build 19044.1586

Thanks

On Mon, Mar 14, 2022 at 11:14 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Rowen,

Although I think I know the answer, I need to ask someone who's using this technique to verify:  Does toggling the mousepad off affect only the trackpad portion, or also disable the left/right click hard buttons (if your mousepad uses these) or the "corner rock presses" left and right if these are used?

On mousepads where there are no literal left and right buttons nor does the whole trackpad allow downward pushes on the corners I have to imagine the whole thing would be turned off, but I'm not certain about when there are

actual "hard controls" for the mouse button presses.

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

Constantly insisting on “my rights” with no consideration of “my responsibilities” isn’t “freedom” — it’s adolescence. ~ Commenter, Evangelos , in comments for America 2022: Where Everyone Has Rights and No One Has Responsibilities ( https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/08/opinion/spotify-joe-rogan-covid-free-speech.html ) , New York Times , February 8, 2022


Rowen Cary
 

hello gene,

I hope this method will allow me to quickly switch the touchpad on and off without resorting to additional software or complicated steps, and maybe other people just happen to want to do the same. Why is it relevant to NVDA? Because NVDA allows users to map keys, for me it solves a lot of problems, like mapping an Application key that might not exist on my laptop keyboard. Of course, using this rare method to be able to switch the touchpad on and off, I think it's useful to NVDA users, so it's relevant.

Thanks

On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 12:17 AM, Gene wrote:

I don't understand the context of what is being discussed.  Why would NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad?  I see no connection between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader.

Gene

On 3/14/2022 11:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote:

Rowen Cary wrote:

    If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]

No it isn't, not always.

Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line, and enter your edit below it.

    Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the touchpad.

I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off, and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have any effect (to answer Brian's question). Win 10, 21H2.

Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found. Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect. Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909).

Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left and right function keys.

Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any laptop had two of those. Or the control key? Or something else?

Luke


Sharad Koirala
 

thanks Rowen.

On 3/15/22, Rowen Cary <manchen_0528@...> wrote:
hello gene,

I hope this method will allow me to quickly switch the touchpad on and off
without resorting to additional software or complicated steps, and maybe
other people just happen to want to do the same.
Why is it relevant to NVDA?
Because NVDA allows users to map keys, for me it solves a lot of problems,
like mapping an Application key that might not exist on my laptop keyboard.
Of course, using this rare method to be able to switch the touchpad on and
off, I think it's useful to NVDA users, so it's relevant.

Thanks

On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 12:17 AM, Gene wrote:


I don't understand the context of what is being discussed.  Why would
NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad?  I see no connection
between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader.


Gene

On 3/14/2022 11:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote:

Rowen Cary wrote:

    If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first
line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]
No it isn't, not always.

Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line,
and enter your edit below it.

    Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the
touchpad.
I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for
this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off,
and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have
any effect (to answer Brian's question).
Win 10, 21H2.

Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has
a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no
convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found.
Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect.
Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909).

Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left
and right function keys.
Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any
laptop had two of those.
Or the control key? Or something else?

Luke









--
Dr. Sharad Koirala
Lecturer
Department of Community Medicine
Gandaki Medical College, Pokhara, Nepal


Quentin Christensen
 

As others have hinted at, NVDA allows you to map ANY keystroke.  We covered the steps to do this using the input gestures dialog in In-Process a few weeks back: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/in-process-22nd-february-2022/#emulating  That would be the preferred method for most users, rather than editing files directly.

As to its relevance - one main use for the feature is to allow Braille device users to map system commands to various keys on the device.  But, if you need to toggle your trackpad on and off regularly, and your device doesn't provide a handy keystroke for that already - then this is also an option.

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 2:55 PM Sharad Koirala <shakoirala@...> wrote:
thanks Rowen.

On 3/15/22, Rowen Cary <manchen_0528@...> wrote:
> hello gene,
>
> I hope this method will allow me to quickly switch the touchpad on and off
> without resorting to additional software or complicated steps, and maybe
> other people just happen to want to do the same.
> Why is it relevant to NVDA?
> Because NVDA allows users to map keys, for me it solves a lot of problems,
> like mapping an Application key that might not exist on my laptop keyboard.
> Of course, using this rare method to be able to switch the touchpad on and
> off, I think it's useful to NVDA users, so it's relevant.
>
> Thanks
>
> On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 12:17 AM, Gene wrote:
>
>>
>> I don't understand the context of what is being discussed.  Why would
>> NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad?  I see no connection
>> between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader.
>>
>>
>> Gene
>>
>> On 3/14/2022 11:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote:
>>
>> > Rowen Cary wrote:
>> >
>> >>     If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first
>> >> line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands]
>> >
>> > No it isn't, not always.
>> >
>> > Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line,
>> > and enter your edit below it.
>> >
>> >>     Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the
>> >> touchpad.
>> >
>> > I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for
>> > this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off,
>> > and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have
>> > any effect (to answer Brian's question).
>> > Win 10, 21H2.
>> >
>> > Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has
>> > a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no
>> > convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found.
>> > Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect.
>> > Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909).
>> >
>> >> Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left
>> >> and right function keys.
>> >
>> > Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any
>> > laptop had two of those.
>> > Or the control key? Or something else?
>> >
>> > Luke
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Dr. Sharad Koirala
Lecturer
Department of Community Medicine
Gandaki Medical College, Pokhara, Nepal







--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Rowen Cary
 

Hi Quentin,

I'm actually more curious if NVDA can distinguish between left and right when mapping keys, For example, I only want to use Ctrl+a letter on the right to achieve a certain function.

Thanks On Thu, Mar 17, 2022 at 08:21 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:

As others have hinted at, NVDA allows you to map ANY keystroke. We covered the steps to do this using the input gestures dialog in In-Process a few weeks back: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/in-process-22nd-february-2022/#emulating That would be the preferred method for most users, rather than editing files directly.

As to its relevance - one main use for the feature is to allow Braille device users to map system commands to various keys on the device. But, if you need to toggle your trackpad on and off regularly, and your device doesn't provide a handy keystroke for that already - then this is also an option.

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 2:55 PM Sharad Koirala shakoirala@... wrote:

thanks Rowen.

On 3/15/22, Rowen Cary wrote: > hello gene, > > I hope this method will allow me to quickly switch the touchpad on and off > without resorting to additional software or complicated steps, and maybe > other people just happen to want to do the same. > Why is it relevant to NVDA? > Because NVDA allows users to map keys, for me it solves a lot of problems, > like mapping an Application key that might not exist on my laptop keyboard. > Of course, using this rare method to be able to switch the touchpad on and > off, I think it's useful to NVDA users, so it's relevant. > > Thanks > > On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 12:17 AM, Gene wrote: > >> >> I don't understand the context of what is being discussed. Why would >> NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad? I see no connection >> between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader. >> >> >> Gene >> >> On 3/14/2022 11:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote: >> >> > Rowen Cary wrote: >> > >> >> If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first >> >> line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands] >> > >> > No it isn't, not always. >> > >> > Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line, >> > and enter your edit below it. >> > >> >> Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the >> >> touchpad. >> > >> > I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for >> > this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off, >> > and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have >> > any effect (to answer Brian's question). >> > Win 10, 21H2. >> > >> > Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has >> > a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no >> > convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found. >> > Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect. >> > Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909). >> > >> >> Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left >> >> and right function keys. >> > >> > Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any >> > laptop had two of those. >> > Or the control key? Or something else? >> > >> > Luke >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > > > > > >

-- Dr. Sharad Koirala Lecturer Department of Community Medicine Gandaki Medical College, Pokhara, Nepal

-- Quentin Christensen Training and Support Manager

Web: www.nvaccess.org Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/ Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/ User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess Twitter: @NVAccess https://twitter.com/NVAccess


Quentin Christensen
 

I know input help will generally tell you what you've pressed, but I'm not sure exactly what input gestures store - and I can't think of a command which ONLY accepts left or right control / alt / shift etc to test with . If you have an example, please do test it and report back!

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Thu, Mar 17, 2022 at 12:44 PM Rowen Cary <manchen_0528@...> wrote:

Hi Quentin,

I'm actually more curious if NVDA can distinguish between left and right when mapping keys, For example, I only want to use Ctrl+a letter on the right to achieve a certain function.

Thanks On Thu, Mar 17, 2022 at 08:21 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:

As others have hinted at, NVDA allows you to map ANY keystroke. We covered the steps to do this using the input gestures dialog in In-Process a few weeks back: https://www.nvaccess.org/post/in-process-22nd-february-2022/#emulating That would be the preferred method for most users, rather than editing files directly.

As to its relevance - one main use for the feature is to allow Braille device users to map system commands to various keys on the device. But, if you need to toggle your trackpad on and off regularly, and your device doesn't provide a handy keystroke for that already - then this is also an option.

Kind regards

Quentin.

On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 2:55 PM Sharad Koirala shakoirala@... wrote:

thanks Rowen.

On 3/15/22, Rowen Cary wrote: > hello gene, > > I hope this method will allow me to quickly switch the touchpad on and off > without resorting to additional software or complicated steps, and maybe > other people just happen to want to do the same. > Why is it relevant to NVDA? > Because NVDA allows users to map keys, for me it solves a lot of problems, > like mapping an Application key that might not exist on my laptop keyboard. > Of course, using this rare method to be able to switch the touchpad on and > off, I think it's useful to NVDA users, so it's relevant. > > Thanks > > On Tue, Mar 15, 2022 at 12:17 AM, Gene wrote: > >> >> I don't understand the context of what is being discussed. Why would >> NVDA be able to turn on and off the touch pad? I see no connection >> between that setting and the functions of a screen-reader. >> >> >> Gene >> >> On 3/14/2022 11:08 AM, Luke Davis wrote: >> >> > Rowen Cary wrote: >> > >> >> If nothing else you will open NVDA's gesture profile, The first >> >> line of the file is: [globalCommands.GlobalCommands] >> > >> > No it isn't, not always. >> > >> > Please make sure, if you're trying this, that you do find that line, >> > and enter your edit below it. >> > >> >> Please try pressing ctrl+F4 to toggle the on/off state of the >> >> touchpad. >> > >> > I have tried this on my MSI laptop, which already has a shortcut for >> > this (FN+F3), and the effect is identical. The touchpad is turned off, >> > and neither the left or right hard clicks at its bottom corners have >> > any effect (to answer Brian's question). >> > Win 10, 21H2. >> > >> > Next, I tried it where it really matters: on my HP Pavilion, which has >> > a jumbo touchpad which has always been a pain while typing, and has no >> > convenient way to disable it on the fly, that I have ever found. >> > Sadly, on that machine, it has no effect. >> > Win 10, 1909 (2018 laptop, can't be upgraded past 1909). >> > >> >> Off topic, I want NVDA's input gestures to distinguish between left >> >> and right function keys. >> > >> > Which key do you mean exactly? The FN key? I was not aware that any >> > laptop had two of those. >> > Or the control key? Or something else? >> > >> > Luke >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > >> > > > > > >

-- Dr. Sharad Koirala Lecturer Department of Community Medicine Gandaki Medical College, Pokhara, Nepal

-- Quentin Christensen Training and Support Manager

Web: www.nvaccess.org Training: https://www.nvaccess.org/shop/ Certification: https://certification.nvaccess.org/ User group: https://nvda.groups.io/g/nvda Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NVAccess Twitter: @NVAccess https://twitter.com/NVAccess



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


Rowen Cary
 

Hi,

For those interested, I found Microsoft's documentation to clarify this.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/component-guidelines/touchpad-toggle-button-to-enable-or-disable

Thanks


 

Just one tiny, and not NVDA-related, addition to this which is on-topic for this particular thread.   A very great many laptop mousepads have the ability to be toggled on/off via a "corner tap" on the mousepad itself.  The laptop I'm on has a Synaptics touchpad.  In its touchpad properties, Tapping settings, that dialog contains a checkbox for Touchpad Disable Zone Settings where the checkbox itself reads:  Double Tap to enable or disable touchpad.  If you have this checked, a subsequent setting, Top Left Action (as that's where you have to double tap) can be set with a radio button to either Switch TouchPad off for one session or Switch TouchPad Off.

I hadn't realized mine also has accessibility options associated with it too that allows mouse movement to be slowed or constrained.

Not that using NVDA key mapping is in any way inappropriate, but there are often built-in methods for the device, too.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

You can't crush ideas by suppressing them. You can only crush them by ignoring them.
     ~ Ursula LeGuin, The Dispossessed


Rowen Cary
 

thanks Brian,

I'm glad you provided this information, my Dell laptop also has a Dell Touchpad Assistant app, but it's so poorly accessible that I can't do it on my own.

Best

Cary On Mon, Apr 11, 2022 at 11:38 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

Just one tiny, and not NVDA-related, addition to this which is on-topic for this particular thread.   A very great many laptop mousepads have the ability to be toggled on/off via a "corner tap" on the mousepad itself.  The laptop I'm on has a Synaptics touchpad.  In its touchpad properties, Tapping settings, that dialog contains a checkbox for Touchpad Disable Zone Settings where the checkbox itself reads:  Double Tap to enable or disable touchpad.  If you have this checked, a subsequent setting, Top Left Action (as that's where you have to double tap) can be set with a radio button to either Switch TouchPad off for one session or Switch TouchPad Off.

I hadn't realized mine also has accessibility options associated with it too that allows mouse movement to be slowed or constrained.

Not that using NVDA key mapping is in any way inappropriate, but there are

often built-in methods for the device, too.

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*You can't crush ideas by suppressing them. You can only crush them by ignoring them. * ~ Ursula LeGuin, The Dispossessed