NVDA failed to install


Howard Traxler
 

Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2.  Now tried to install the latest; 22.1.  Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up.  I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it.  Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone?  Thanks.
Howard


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Howard,

What version of windows are you using? If it's a much older version, then you'd have to use a much older version of NVDA.

Hope this helps.

Rosemarie

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2022 11:36 AM
To: NVDA <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] NVDA failed to install

Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2. Now tried to install the latest; 22.1. Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up. I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it. Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone? Thanks.
Howard


Gene
 

Try answering yes when UAC comes up.  Escape only closes UAC and doesn't allow the action it is asking about.  Alt y when the UAC prompt comes up and you want to answer yes.  Escape or alt n when you want to answer no.

I think it is a very bad idea to disable a security feature such as UAC when it isn't necessary.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 1:36 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:

Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2.  Now tried to install the latest; 22.1.  Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up.  I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it.  Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone?  Thanks.
Howard





.


Gene
 

Even if its Windows  servicePack1, NVDA supports it.  If you try to install aversion that your operating system is incompatible with, you will get a message telling you that. 

Gene
On 6/1/2022 1:39 PM, Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:

Hi, Howard,

What version of windows are you using? If it's a much older version, then you'd have to use a much older version of NVDA.

Hope this helps.

Rosemarie



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2022 11:36 AM
To: NVDA <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] NVDA failed to install

Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2.  Now tried to install the latest; 22.1.  Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up.  I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it.  Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone?  Thanks.
Howard













Howard Traxler
 

I didn't hear anything about UAC nor a yes or no question.  Maybe an alt y at the time of lockup will do it.  I'll give it a try.

Thanks.
Howard

On 6/1/2022 1:48 PM, Gene wrote:
Try answering yes when UAC comes up.  Escape only closes UAC and doesn't allow the action it is asking about.  Alt y when the UAC prompt comes up and you want to answer yes.  Escape or alt n when you want to answer no.

I think it is a very bad idea to disable a security feature such as UAC when it isn't necessary.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 1:36 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2.  Now tried to install the latest; 22.1.  Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up.  I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it.  Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone?  Thanks.
Howard





.


Gene
 

You were using the talking installer at that time.  That is running as though it were a portable version of NVDA.  When UAC comes up, portable NVDA won't read the message.  It may say something like secure desktop.  Answer y because according to your description, the UAC prompt has come up.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 2:02 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:

I didn't hear anything about UAC nor a yes or no question.  Maybe an alt y at the time of lockup will do it.  I'll give it a try.

Thanks.
Howard

On 6/1/2022 1:48 PM, Gene wrote:
Try answering yes when UAC comes up.  Escape only closes UAC and doesn't allow the action it is asking about.  Alt y when the UAC prompt comes up and you want to answer yes.  Escape or alt n when you want to answer no.

I think it is a very bad idea to disable a security feature such as UAC when it isn't necessary.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 1:36 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2.  Now tried to install the latest; 22.1.  Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up.  I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it.  Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone?  Thanks.
Howard





.










Gene
 

I should have said use alt y for yes.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 2:11 PM, Gene wrote:

You were using the talking installer at that time.  That is running as though it were a portable version of NVDA.  When UAC comes up, portable NVDA won't read the message.  It may say something like secure desktop.  Answer y because according to your description, the UAC prompt has come up.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 2:02 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
I didn't hear anything about UAC nor a yes or no question.  Maybe an alt y at the time of lockup will do it.  I'll give it a try.

Thanks.
Howard

On 6/1/2022 1:48 PM, Gene wrote:
Try answering yes when UAC comes up.  Escape only closes UAC and doesn't allow the action it is asking about.  Alt y when the UAC prompt comes up and you want to answer yes.  Escape or alt n when you want to answer no.

I think it is a very bad idea to disable a security feature such as UAC when it isn't necessary.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 1:36 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2.  Now tried to install the latest; 22.1.  Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up.  I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it.  Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone?  Thanks.
Howard





.











Howard Traxler
 

When I do  windows plus R and at the run prompt, type winver, the answer is version 1803 and build 17134 something.  I've tried to find how to update windows but can't find it.  It wants to update my office 2003; and I know there's no update for that; but that's all it shows.  There must be a way to do this?
Howard

On 6/1/2022 1:39 PM, Rosemarie Chavarria wrote:
Hi, Howard,

What version of windows are you using? If it's a much older version, then you'd have to use a much older version of NVDA.

Hope this helps.

Rosemarie



-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Howard Traxler
Sent: Wednesday, June 1, 2022 11:36 AM
To: NVDA <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Subject: [nvda] NVDA failed to install

Starting to use a computer that has been out of service for two or three years.

Started by removing the NVDA that was on there; might have been version 19.2. Now tried to install the latest; 22.1. Get to the point of "continue button and it says "secure desktop" and locks up. I press escape and it says "NVDA failed".

I tried to find where I could turn off that "secure desktop" But I couldn't find it. Now I don't have NVDA on there and I have to use a portable version on a USB thumb drive.

Ideas anyone? Thanks.
Howard










 

If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go.  Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them.

        ~ Joshua Liebman


Howard Traxler
 

Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it done.

Howard

On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
*/Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file/* <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
--

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*/Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them./*

        ~ Joshua Liebman


Gene
 

But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong.  Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it done.

Howard



On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
*/Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file/* <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
--

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*/Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them./*

        ~ Joshua Liebman





hurrikennyandopo ...
 

Hi


If you do not want the UAC screen to come up when installing nvda and some other programs he will need to do the following.

Press the windows key and in the search box type uac it should come up with a suggestion press the enter key on it.

The next screen that comes up you will need to Tab until you hear the slider it is set to 65 percent or around there change it to zero with the arrow keys left or right then tab down to ok then press the enter key.


It will reboot the pc if I remember right and the uac screen will not come up again. It can be turned back on by doing the same process except in the slider change from zero back to 65 percent or what ever it is.

hope it helps.


Gene nz

On 2/06/2022 9:04 am, Gene wrote:
But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong. Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it done.

Howard



On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
*/Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file/* <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
--

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*/Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them./*

        ~ Joshua Liebman









Gene
 

I really object to disabling UAC.  While it can be defeated by some malware, I don't know how much, I see no reason to disable a layer of protection when all you have to do is issue the command alt y when UAC comes up.  Why disable a security utility when it is so easy to allow programs to be installed?  You are decreasing security for no advantage that means anything.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 4:12 PM, hurrikennyandopo ... wrote:

Hi


If you do not want the UAC screen to come up when installing nvda and some other programs he will need to do the following.

Press the windows key and in the search box type uac it should come up with a suggestion press the enter key on it.

The next screen that comes up you will need to Tab until you hear the slider it is set to 65 percent or around there change it to zero with the arrow keys left or right then tab down to ok then press the enter key.


It will reboot the pc if I remember right and the uac screen will not come up again. It can be turned back on by doing the same process except in the slider change from zero back to 65 percent or what ever it is.

hope it helps.


Gene nz


On 2/06/2022 9:04 am, Gene wrote:
But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong. Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it done.

Howard



On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
*/Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file/* <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
-- 

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*/Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them./*

        ~ Joshua Liebman





















Howard Traxler
 

OK Gene, when you say start menu, are you refering to what happens when I press the windows key and get a search box?  I think that's what folks are calling the start menu.

I've got a few things to try right now; so I'm fixed for a while. I'm using the media creation tool to make an thunb drive update media.  When it's done, I'll take it downstairs and see if it updates the computer.

Howard

On 6/1/2022 4:04 PM, Gene wrote:
But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong. Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it done.

Howard



On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
*/Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file/* <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
--

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*/Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them./*

        ~ Joshua Liebman









Gene
 

Yes.  I'm talking about doing that and typing in the windows start search menu, which is where you will be

I'm suggesting you do what I suggest first.  You don't know if the computer isn't downloading updates.  If you check, you will know.  I'm not saying you shouldn't do other things if there is a problem but you don't know yet. 

You are showing the old version of Windows because the computer hasn't finished updating itself.  That doesn't mean there is anything wrong.  You said the computer hasn't been used for a number of years.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 4:28 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:

OK Gene, when you say start menu, are you refering to what happens when I press the windows key and get a search box?  I think that's what folks are calling the start menu.

I've got a few things to try right now; so I'm fixed for a while. I'm using the media creation tool to make an thunb drive update media.  When it's done, I'll take it downstairs and see if it updates the computer.

Howard

On 6/1/2022 4:04 PM, Gene wrote:
But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong. Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

Gene

On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:
Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it done.

Howard



On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long time indeed.

I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is the latest:
*/Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows ISO file/* <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>
or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>, and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.
-- 

Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

*/Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them./*

        ~ Joshua Liebman






















Arlene
 

Yes, that’s what I do. I turn it off. Then once I install the program I want. Then I turn it back on and put it to 65 or whatever it is I have it at.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: hurrikennyandopo ...
Sent: June 1, 2022 2:12 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA failed to install

 

Hi

 

 

If you do not want the UAC screen to come up when installing nvda and

some other programs he will need to do the following.

 

Press the windows key and in the search box type uac it should come up

with a suggestion press the enter key on it.

 

The next screen that comes up you will need to Tab until you hear the

slider it is set to 65 percent or around there change it to zero with

the arrow keys left or right then tab down to ok then press the enter key.

 

 

It will reboot the pc if I remember right and the uac screen will not

come up again. It can be turned back on by doing the same process except

in the slider change from zero back to 65 percent or what ever it is.

 

hope it helps.

 

 

Gene nz

 

 

On 2/06/2022 9:04 am, Gene wrote:

> But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong.

> Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

> Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information

> read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

> Gene

> On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:

>> Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she

>> seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your

>> instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get

>> it done.

>> 

>> Howard

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

>>> If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then

>>> Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long

>>> time indeed.

>>> 

>>> I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on

>>> what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is

>>> the latest:

>>> */Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update

>>> Using the Windows ISO file/*

>>> <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>

>>> or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page

>>> <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>,

>>> and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

>>> 

>>> Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows

>>> 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version

>>> 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.

>>> --

>>> 

>>> Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

>>> 

>>> */Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand

>>> another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing

>>> or accepting them./*

>>> 

>>>         ~ Joshua Liebman

>>> 

>>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

>

 

 

 

 

 


Arlene
 

Yes, if it hasn’t been used for years. Then its missing windows updates.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Gene
Sent: June 1, 2022 2:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA failed to install

 

But if it hasn't been used for years, maybe there is something wrong. 

Have you checked updates to see if any are shown to be installed?

 

Open the start menu, type update and press enter.  Let the information

read.  If you don't hear anything about updates, let us know.

 

Gene

 

On 6/1/2022 3:51 PM, Howard Traxler wrote:

> Thank you, yes.  This was a computer in my wife's play room which she

> seldom used; not for two or three years.  I will look at your

> instructions and see which way is easiest.  And hopefully I can get it

> done.

> Howard

> On 6/1/2022 3:11 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

>> If you are still all the way back on Windows 10 Version 1803 then

>> Windows Update has been broken on your machine for a very, very long

>> time indeed.

>> 

>> I suggest you immediately follow these instructions, which based on

>> what downloads now will get you to Windows 10 Version 21H2, which is

>> the latest:

>> */Performing a Windows 10 or 11 Repair Install or Feature Update

>> Using the Windows ISO file/*

>> <https://drive.google.com/uc?export=download&id=1RZiHlLVtXewYBgoSvJNm9_08hj1tALPK>

>> or, if you prefer, go to the Windows 10 Download Page

>> <https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows10?d2784474-fdb0-4e9d-9e47-5e88c0e053ec=True>,

>> and trigger the Update Assistant using the Update Now button.

>> 

>> Something needs to be done, pronto, to fix your instance of Windows

>> 10 and get it back on track as far as feature updates go. Version

>> 1803 has been out of support for quite a while now.

>> --

>> 

>> Brian -Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

>> 

>> */Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand

>> another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing

>> or accepting them./*

>> 

>>         ~ Joshua Liebman

>> 

>> 

>

 

 

 

 

 

 


Luke Davis
 

Howard Traxler wrote:

I didn't hear anything about UAC nor a yes or no question.  Maybe an alt y at the time of lockup will do it.  I'll give it a try.
But you did. It's not locking up, it's opening a UAC prompt, which is a secure screen.

Either press Alt+Y, or turn on Narrator with Control+Windows+Enter, read the secure screen window, and do what it says.

Since you don't seem to be aware of this: when Windows needs higher security permissions than your user has, it brings up a UAC (User Account Control) prompt. That prompt runs as the system administrative user. It's what NVDA calls a "secure screen".
Since that is a different user then the one you're running as, that other user isn't running NVDA. That's why it doesn't talk, and you think it's locking up. But it's not locking up, it just isn't talking.

You either need to be able to handle that screen on auto-pilot, by pressing Alt+Y, or you need to enter a password for an admin level account, which probably requires speech to be successful at this stage. To get speech, you either have to install NVDA and have it run on secure screens (a chicken and egg problem in this case), or you need to run Narrator in the admin user account as I described.

You should try to finish installing NVDA before updating Windows, in case that isn't obvious.

Luke


 

On Wed, Jun 1, 2022 at 07:10 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Since you don't seem to be aware of this: when Windows needs higher security permissions than your user has, it brings up a UAC (User Account Control) prompt. That prompt runs as the system administrative user. It's what NVDA calls a "secure screen".
-
Luke,

The following is hair-splitting, but I think it's important for users to understand exactly what's going on.  The vast majority of us who have a single user on a given machine have one that has administrative privilege.  But even if you do, things that actually require that privilege to be active will trigger UAC, because even accounts that have admin privilege are expected to grant its use consciously in more recent versions of Windows.  At one time, that wasn't the case, and if you did something that required admin privilege and were using an account that had admin privilege, it would just run.

Much of the reason for UAC is the way malware of various forms work, particularly as far as trying to install something.  It is possible to accidentally kick off a malware install you had no intention of actually doing, and when UAC prompts and you don't even recognize the thing it's prompting for, you just refuse to allow the changes to be made to your machine.  I once, a long time ago, had UAC save my bacon in precisely that way, and am thankful for it, as the "trouble" of having to confirm I wish to allow changes to be made to my machine by an installer I kicked off is just minimal.

You are correct, though, that if you happen to be running as a standard user, once UAC gets involved you will have to present credentials for another account that has administrative privilege before you can have any installer proceed.  And I use standard user accounts specifically to make it well-nigh impossible for users who have them to install anything or change any settings that are not user associated.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Tolerance is the positive and cordial effort to understand another's beliefs, practices, and habits without necessarily sharing or accepting them.

        ~ Joshua Liebman


Luke Davis
 

Arlene wrote:

Yes, that’s what I do. I turn it off. Then once I install the program I want. Then I turn it back on and put it to 65 or whatever it is I have it at.
This is utterly baffling to me. Why in the world would you do that?

It is so much more work than just selecting yes, or pressing Alt+Y, at the periodic UAC prompt while installing something.

If you have NVDA set to run on secure screens (NVDA General settings), the dialogs will speak normally, and you can interact with them just fine.

Luke