An Odd Issue with NVDA 2022 and Thunderbird 102


Roger Stewart
 

I noticed yesterday after updating Thunderbird to the latest version that it no longer worked with NVDA. I tried restarting and then ran the Com Registration tool and the problem was still there.  Now for some reason when I started this morning that now all is good again!  This is a real mystery to me but maybe the computer just needed to sleep on the problem overnight and it got things worked out!  :)  I really don't know what happened but at least I can use Thunderbird with NVDA again.


Roger


 

Topic retitled for archival purposes.
--

Brian Virginia, USA  Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

         ~ Austin O'Malley


Brian's Mail list account
 

This came up a few weeks back on one of the groups, I'm assuming it was not you. I thought that the issue then was that the original restart was just onne of the sleep or standby modes, whereas the next day the machine had been completely shut down.
I've seen some very odd behaviours with hibernate, sleep standby or whatever other mode is in vogue this week. In one case you could open folders but not action anything from ether keyboard or launch software. Another time nvda would not open its menu, well it opened it but any cursor merely closed it again. In both cases a complete shut down for a period brought the problem to a conclusion. I can only imagine that when windows writes its recovery data to the disc, it gets it wrong somewhere. I have gotten into the habit since I have had a machine that boots from an ssd of always taking the complete shutdown option, and no further issues seem to occur unless its a misbehaving piece of software. I have one of those small problems, is that a word' running at boot up that alerts me if anything tries to mess with start up areas of Windows, and tell it to not allow the changes. Also a good one if installing new untested software is unchcky, which spots 'invisible; checkboxes in installers, the kind that tries to install Chrome or some anti virus trial version and stops them.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <britechguy@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2022 4:45 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] An Odd Issue with NVDA 2022 and Thunderbird 102


Topic retitled for archival purposes.
--

Brian - Virginia, USA - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044

Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

~ Austin O'Malley


Gene
 

Restart is not a standby mode and it is a complete shutdown of Windows.  Shutting down the computer is not a full shut down if you have quick start enabled.  It does turn off power but it doesn't completely shut down Windows.  To make booting faster, some information is retained.

Quick restart is not used if you issue the restart command, and it is the command you should use if you don't know if you have quick start enabled and you want to make sure Windows fully shuts down.

You may have seen that the person was issuing the shutdown command and the problem persisted but a restart solved it because the person was using quick start.

Shutting down for a time won't solve problems caused by using quick start.  Restarting, when using fast start may.

I don't know if quick start is the default setting.  If you use quick start or you don't know if you are, you should issue the restart command every number of days because not fully shutting down Windows for too long causes problems.

Using an SSD is irrelevant.  Commands like restart and shut down or quick start do exactly the same things regardless of hard drive being used and all other commands such as sleep or hibernate do exactly the same things.

Gene

On 10/17/2022 4:00 AM, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io wrote:
This came up a few weeks back on one of the groups, I'm assuming it was not you. I thought that the issue then was that the original restart was just onne of the sleep or standby modes, whereas the next day the machine had been completely shut down.
I've seen some very odd behaviours with hibernate, sleep standby or whatever other mode is in vogue this week. In one case you could open folders but not action anything from ether keyboard or launch software. Another time nvda would not open its menu, well it opened it but any cursor merely closed it again. In both cases a complete shut down for a period brought the problem to a conclusion. I can only imagine that when windows writes its recovery data to the disc, it gets it wrong somewhere. I have gotten into the habit since I have had a machine that boots from an ssd of always taking the complete shutdown option, and no further issues seem to occur unless its a misbehaving piece of software. I have one of those small problems, is that a word' running at boot up that alerts me if anything tries to mess with start up areas of Windows, and tell it to not allow the changes. Also a good one if installing new untested software is unchcky, which spots 'invisible;  checkboxes in  installers, the kind that tries to install Chrome or some anti virus trial version and stops them.
Brian


Gene
 

As far as completely shutting down versus using the restart command, if you use the restart command, that should completely clear the memory.  When you talk about shutting down and letting the computer sit for a time, that is because you evidently think that will clear the memory more.  As far as I know, it makes no difference.  Using the restart command clears the memory fully as well.

The person who asked the question may tell us whether he used the restart command or the shut down command and when.

Gene

On 10/17/2022 8:28 AM, Gene wrote:
Restart is not a standby mode and it is a complete shutdown of Windows. Shutting down the computer is not a full shut down if you have quick start enabled.  It does turn off power but it doesn't completely shut down Windows.  To make booting faster, some information is retained.

Quick restart is not used if you issue the restart command, and it is the command you should use if you don't know if you have quick start enabled and you want to make sure Windows fully shuts down.

You may have seen that the person was issuing the shutdown command and the problem persisted but a restart solved it because the person was using quick start.

Shutting down for a time won't solve problems caused by using quick start.  Restarting, when using fast start may.

I don't know if quick start is the default setting.  If you use quick start or you don't know if you are, you should issue the restart command every number of days because not fully shutting down Windows for too long causes problems.

Using an SSD is irrelevant.  Commands like restart and shut down or quick start do exactly the same things regardless of hard drive being used and all other commands such as sleep or hibernate do exactly the same things.

Gene

On 10/17/2022 4:00 AM, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io wrote:
This came up a few weeks back on one of the groups, I'm assuming it was not you. I thought that the issue then was that the original restart was just onne of the sleep or standby modes, whereas the next day the machine had been completely shut down.
I've seen some very odd behaviours with hibernate, sleep standby or whatever other mode is in vogue this week. In one case you could open folders but not action anything from ether keyboard or launch software. Another time nvda would not open its menu, well it opened it but any cursor merely closed it again. In both cases a complete shut down for a period brought the problem to a conclusion. I can only imagine that when windows writes its recovery data to the disc, it gets it wrong somewhere. I have gotten into the habit since I have had a machine that boots from an ssd of always taking the complete shutdown option, and no further issues seem to occur unless its a misbehaving piece of software. I have one of those small problems, is that a word' running at boot up that alerts me if anything tries to mess with start up areas of Windows, and tell it to not allow the changes. Also a good one if installing new untested software is unchcky, which spots 'invisible;  checkboxes in  installers, the kind that tries to install Chrome or some anti virus trial version and stops them.
Brian


Gene
 

I should have said using the shut down command should fully clear the memory as well.  If you use quick start, I don't know if shut down fully clears the memory.  I'm quite sure it clears ram, but I believe that what is in ram at the time of shut down is stored on disk and is retrieved when you start if using fast start.

I would strongly recommend that anyone using fast start turn it off.  It may cause problems and it doesn't save enough time to be worth the problems it may cause.

Gene

On 10/17/2022 8:40 AM, Gene via groups.io wrote:
As far as completely shutting down versus using the restart command, if you use the restart command, that should completely clear the memory.  When you talk about shutting down and letting the computer sit for a time, that is because you evidently think that will clear the memory more.  As far as I know, it makes no difference.  Using the restart command clears the memory fully as well.

The person who asked the question may tell us whether he used the restart command or the shut down command and when.

Gene


On 10/17/2022 8:28 AM, Gene wrote:
Restart is not a standby mode and it is a complete shutdown of Windows. Shutting down the computer is not a full shut down if you have quick start enabled.  It does turn off power but it doesn't completely shut down Windows.  To make booting faster, some information is retained.

Quick restart is not used if you issue the restart command, and it is the command you should use if you don't know if you have quick start enabled and you want to make sure Windows fully shuts down.

You may have seen that the person was issuing the shutdown command and the problem persisted but a restart solved it because the person was using quick start.

Shutting down for a time won't solve problems caused by using quick start.  Restarting, when using fast start may.

I don't know if quick start is the default setting.  If you use quick start or you don't know if you are, you should issue the restart command every number of days because not fully shutting down Windows for too long causes problems.

Using an SSD is irrelevant.  Commands like restart and shut down or quick start do exactly the same things regardless of hard drive being used and all other commands such as sleep or hibernate do exactly the same things.

Gene

On 10/17/2022 4:00 AM, Brian's Mail list account via groups.io wrote:
This came up a few weeks back on one of the groups, I'm assuming it was not you. I thought that the issue then was that the original restart was just onne of the sleep or standby modes, whereas the next day the machine had been completely shut down.
I've seen some very odd behaviours with hibernate, sleep standby or whatever other mode is in vogue this week. In one case you could open folders but not action anything from ether keyboard or launch software. Another time nvda would not open its menu, well it opened it but any cursor merely closed it again. In both cases a complete shut down for a period brought the problem to a conclusion. I can only imagine that when windows writes its recovery data to the disc, it gets it wrong somewhere. I have gotten into the habit since I have had a machine that boots from an ssd of always taking the complete shutdown option, and no further issues seem to occur unless its a misbehaving piece of software. I have one of those small problems, is that a word' running at boot up that alerts me if anything tries to mess with start up areas of Windows, and tell it to not allow the changes. Also a good one if installing new untested software is unchcky, which spots 'invisible;  checkboxes in  installers, the kind that tries to install Chrome or some anti virus trial version and stops them.
Brian