A Gentle Reminder About Using Descriptive Topic Titles #adminnotice


 

Hello All,

As of late I've noticed a slide toward the use of generic topic titles that give the reader absolutely no idea what it's all about, which is what the topic title should do.  I am asking everyone to please take the following group rule very seriously.  In times of flux like we're in now, having topic titles that give a clear picture of what's being discussed is absolutely vital.

4.  Think very carefully about the title you are going to give any topic you post.  The topic is the first (and, sometimes, only) thing a member sees and that may be how they decide if they’re going to look further.   Generic titles, such as “Help Me!,” or, "Weird problem," are not helpful because they give no idea about what.  Compare that to something like, “NVDA not reading Excel cell contents,” or, “NVDA setting for pronouncing numbers,” where the exact issue where help is needed is front and center.   Even something like, “Need help with the following . . .,” lets the reader know that you are going to present a list of issues.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel

 


Quentin Christensen
 

Also just a reminder that if you solve an issue you have asked for help with and want to share that - please do so as a reply to your original post.  I took the time to reply to a query earlier, only to then come across a later post not connected to the original one stating that the issue was fixed.


On Sun, Jun 6, 2021 at 2:01 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
Hello All,

As of late I've noticed a slide toward the use of generic topic titles that give the reader absolutely no idea what it's all about, which is what the topic title should do.  I am asking everyone to please take the following group rule very seriously.  In times of flux like we're in now, having topic titles that give a clear picture of what's being discussed is absolutely vital.

4.  Think very carefully about the title you are going to give any topic you post.  The topic is the first (and, sometimes, only) thing a member sees and that may be how they decide if they’re going to look further.   Generic titles, such as “Help Me!,” or, "Weird problem," are not helpful because they give no idea about what.  Compare that to something like, “NVDA not reading Excel cell contents,” or, “NVDA setting for pronouncing numbers,” where the exact issue where help is needed is front and center.   Even something like, “Need help with the following . . .,” lets the reader know that you are going to present a list of issues.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel

 



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


 

On Mon, Jun 7, 2021 at 04:38 AM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
Also just a reminder that if you solve an issue you have asked for help with and want to share that - please do so as a reply to your original post.
-
A big, "Amen!!," to that!  A topic is just that - a unit - and the solution to an issue, when found, should be at the end of the topic where the issue was identified and assistance sought. 

It also makes much more sense when folks search the archive.  They can see everything related to a given instance of a question from beginning to resolution in a single topic.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel