Android Emulators


Jacques Jumonville <jpjino885@...>
 

Hi my name is Jacques and I'm blind and I'd like to know if there are any emulators with google play store included in them that could work with NVDA?


Russell James
 

I didn't see any response to your request

I'll share what I know and hopes that it will help you

The Android emulator that comes with the Android SDK is not going to work with nvda on your Windows computer
You will need a screen reader running in the Android emulator such as Google TalkBack in order to access the screen content of the Android emulator

I have not used that emulator for some time and you used to have to side load Google talkback to make this happen

In the past I have requested keyboard shortcuts on Android to enable accessibility so that you could do things like this using the Android emulator or an Android virtual machine

I'm not aware of any Android emulators that come with talkback installed and enabled but it's not out of the question

Similar capabilities can be achieved using an Android image running in a virtual machine on your Windows computer and over the years there have been several of these images shared after having installed and enabled TalkBack

If you reply with what you want to use the Android emulator for on your Windows computer maybe there are recommendations they can be shared

Russ


On Tue, Sep 21, 2021, 11:08 PM Jacques Jumonville <jpjino885@...> wrote:
Hi my name is Jacques and I'm blind and I'd like to know if there are any emulators with google play store included in them that could work with NVDA?






JM Casey
 

In addition to what you said here, I’d just like to iterate that for sure, no android emulator will run NVDA. The whole point of an emulater is that it  uses your system to mirror a completely differetn system in as close a way as possible. Thus, the Android emulator will only run Android programmes; not Windows ones. You will need to start thinking of the emulation as a completely separate environment from your windows system, even if it is running on your windows box.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Russell James
Sent: September 23, 2021 11:25 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Android Emulators

 

I didn't see any response to your request

I'll share what I know and hopes that it will help you

The Android emulator that comes with the Android SDK is not going to work with nvda on your Windows computer
You will need a screen reader running in the Android emulator such as Google TalkBack in order to access the screen content of the Android emulator

I have not used that emulator for some time and you used to have to side load Google talkback to make this happen

In the past I have requested keyboard shortcuts on Android to enable accessibility so that you could do things like this using the Android emulator or an Android virtual machine

I'm not aware of any Android emulators that come with talkback installed and enabled but it's not out of the question

Similar capabilities can be achieved using an Android image running in a virtual machine on your Windows computer and over the years there have been several of these images shared after having installed and enabled TalkBack

If you reply with what you want to use the Android emulator for on your Windows computer maybe there are recommendations they can be shared

Russ

 

On Tue, Sep 21, 2021, 11:08 PM Jacques Jumonville <jpjino885@...> wrote:

Hi my name is Jacques and I'm blind and I'd like to know if there are any emulators with google play store included in them that could work with NVDA?





 

On Thu, Sep 23, 2021 at 02:32 PM, JM Casey wrote:
You will need to start thinking of the emulation as a completely separate environment from your windows system, even if it is running on your windows box.
-
You're absolutely correct.  Emulators are, in effect, sandboxed virtual machines, and within those environments it is precisely as though you were working natively under the operating system being emulated.  The only thing that happens in Windows itself is kicking off the emulator and exiting the emulator (and you can, of course, do the latter from within the emulator, too).  Windows recognizes the emulator as an application, but that's about it.

I'd think that most Android Emulators that are currently maintained could install Android Accessibility Suite in the instance of emulated Android they control.  The logistics of that, however, I have not played with.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

         ~Martin Luther King, Jr.

 


JM Casey
 

Yes. Drifting a bit off topic but, emulation is a pretty fascinating idea. My ex used to run video game system emulators on one of our pCs and a few years ago I got an emulator running on windows that perfectly simulated my first computer, an Apple II E. They even perfectly replicated through software the circuitry of the old Echo speech hardware synth.

 

But yeah, first rule of emulation is: emulator will only run what’s native to the things it is supposed to be emulating…and not always even those things, since there can sometimes be unexpected glitches in emulation, as you might expect.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: September 23, 2021 02:57 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Android Emulators

 

On Thu, Sep 23, 2021 at 02:32 PM, JM Casey wrote:

You will need to start thinking of the emulation as a completely separate environment from your windows system, even if it is running on your windows box.

-
You're absolutely correct.  Emulators are, in effect, sandboxed virtual machines, and within those environments it is precisely as though you were working natively under the operating system being emulated.  The only thing that happens in Windows itself is kicking off the emulator and exiting the emulator (and you can, of course, do the latter from within the emulator, too).  Windows recognizes the emulator as an application, but that's about it.

I'd think that most Android Emulators that are currently maintained could install Android Accessibility Suite in the instance of emulated Android they control.  The logistics of that, however, I have not played with.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

         ~Martin Luther King, Jr.