Another object question,


Janet Brandly
 

Hello again,

 

Thank you for the links to those articles. I will definitely check them out. In the meantime, what is the best way to set the NVDA settings for NVDA to deal with them?

 

Thanks again,

 

Janet


Gene
 

It isn’t a question of settings.  It’s a question of learning commands for moving among and within objects.  An object may have another object in it, by analogy something like a table and a leg attached to the table.  The table is the object that is at a higher level and the leg is the object you move down to.
 
If you still have questions after you listen to the materials, ask here.  To clarify matters, arranging a demonstration with someone might be the best way to clarify things.
 
Gene

---- Original Message-----
Sent: Saturday, July 17, 2021 3:06 PM
Subject: [nvda] Another object question,
 

Hello again,

 

Thank you for the links to those articles. I will definitely check them out. In the meantime, what is the best way to set the NVDA settings for NVDA to deal with them?

 

Thanks again,

 

Janet


 

On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 04:20 PM, Gene wrote:
It’s a question of learning commands for moving among and within objects.  An object may have another object in it, by analogy something like a table and a leg attached to the table.  The table is the object that is at a higher level and the leg is the object you move down to.
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And that's it, right there.  Practice, practice, practice without attempting to do anything productive while you're trying to get a sense of the object structure of whatever it is you happen to be working on.  And that something should ideally be a completed version of "whatever the whole thing happens to be" so that your noodling around to explore its object structure will reveal most, if not all, of what you need to know when dealing with similar objects (in the broad sense of that word, like Word Documents, web pages, etc.) going forward.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

I do not understand why some seek to separate a person from their actions.  The self is composed of an individual’s thoughts, actions, and expression, which are contained in and actuated by the body.  What you do and say is the clearest indicator of who you are.

      ~ Brian Vogel