Topics

Antivirus

 

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert dialogs and settings windows.

Rosemarie Chavarria
 

Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie



On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert dialogs and settings windows.


Arlene
 

Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.

 

From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

 

Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie


On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert dialogs and settings windows.

 

Gene
 

As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible the program is.  Many advisors say that it is better to use something else because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be. 
 
It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy, and what it is.  I believe that those considering using the program should be encouraged to look into the contraversy.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.

 

From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

 

Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie


On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert dialogs and settings windows.

 

Brian's Mail list account BY <bglists@...>
 

Well, all anti virus programs tend to have one weakness, even if that is that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as many, but unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy links in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other products on my machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The pundits always have their favourites, and certainly do not have the added issues of accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it is, as I'm constantly reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible the program is. Many advisors say that it is better to use something else because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy, and what it is. I believe that those considering using the program should be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert dialogs and settings windows.

 

Well I ran malwarebytes a few days ago and found they changed it again such as I had to use another reader to do bits of the scan.
while it did find some bad bits they were left overs and not malicious processes and while I did clear those bits who knows.
You are right, every security system has its weekness.
The only good av protection I think is a online cloud based one msse is supposed to be cloud protected if you allow that to be the case and it is.
But others must have that to.
I forgot what it is now but back in the day I had a program /tuneup /security tool that did av and other protection, it would suggest stuff when you installed or downloaded stuff or well tried to do almost everything.
From time to time it found some good stuff.

On 7/03/2016 9:12 p.m., Brian's Mail list account wrote:
Well, all anti virus programs tend to have one weakness, even if that
is that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down
stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as many, but
unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy
links in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other
products on my machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The
pundits always have their favourites, and certainly do not have the
added issues of accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it
is, as I'm constantly reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up
with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how
accessible the program is. Many advisors say that it is better to use
something else because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they
think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when
people ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a
contraversy, and what it is. I believe that those considering using the
program should be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer
holiday of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good
enough? I have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is
suspicious I either run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a
particular attention as I do have access to a licensed copy through my
university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version)
accessible with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly
interact with alert dialogs and settings windows.







Gene
 

There are other e-mail programs with much better ratings that are reasonably accessible and don't slow things down.  Knowledgeable people differ on whether Windows Defender is adequate and people should read about the subject.  When Kim Komando recommends that people use something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well, that in my opinion, is cause for serious consideration. 
 
With reasonable care, Windows Defender may be alright but it has poor detection rates compared with many programs.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Well, all anti virus programs tend to have  one weakness, even if that is
that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as  many, but
unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy links
in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other products on my
machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The pundits always have
their favourites, and certainly do not have the added issues of
accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it is, as I'm constantly
reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up with.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible
the program is.  Many advisors say that it is better to use something else
because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people
ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy,
and what it is.  I believe that those considering using the program should
be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

  Hi all,

  I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday
of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I
have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either
run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as
I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

  If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible
with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert
dialogs and settings windows.







Gene
 

What I meant to say is that there are other antimalware programs with much better ratings.
 
Gene

----- Original message -----
From: Gene
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 6:11 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

There are other e-mail programs with much better ratings that are reasonably accessible and don't slow things down.  Knowledgeable people differ on whether Windows Defender is adequate and people should read about the subject.  When Kim Komando recommends that people use something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well, that in my opinion, is cause for serious consideration. 
 
With reasonable care, Windows Defender may be alright but it has poor detection rates compared with many programs.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Well, all anti virus programs tend to have  one weakness, even if that is
that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as  many, but
unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy links
in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other products on my
machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The pundits always have
their favourites, and certainly do not have the added issues of
accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it is, as I'm constantly
reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up with.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible
the program is.  Many advisors say that it is better to use something else
because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people
ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy,
and what it is.  I believe that those considering using the program should
be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

  Hi all,

  I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday
of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I
have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either
run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as
I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

  If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible
with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert
dialogs and settings windows.







Kevin Cussick
 

I am using sophus and after a bit of a shaky start I now have it on 3 of my many computers and it is Ok seems to be fully accessible. I admit I have not looked around to see what the ratings are like but I might now that I have thought about it.

On 07/03/2016 12:11, Gene wrote:
There are other e-mail programs with much better ratings that are reasonably accessible and don't slow things down. Knowledgeable people differ on whether Windows Defender is adequate and people should read about the subject. When Kim Komando recommends that people use something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well, that in my opinion, is cause for serious consideration.

With reasonable care, Windows Defender may be alright but it has poor detection rates compared with many programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Well, all anti virus programs tend to have one weakness, even if that is
that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as many, but
unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy links
in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other products on my
machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The pundits always have
their favourites, and certainly do not have the added issues of
accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it is, as I'm constantly
reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible
the program is. Many advisors say that it is better to use something else
because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people
ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy,
and what it is. I believe that those considering using the program should
be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday
of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I
have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either
run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular attention as
I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version) accessible
with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert
dialogs and settings windows.







Angela Delicata
 

Hi,
I use eset nod32.

Il 07/03/2016 13:33, Kevin Cussick via Groups.io ha scritto:
I am using sophus and after a bit of a shaky start I now have it on 3 of
my many computers and it is Ok seems to be fully accessible. I admit I
have not looked around to see what the ratings are like but I might now
that I have thought about it.

On 07/03/2016 12:11, Gene wrote:
There are other e-mail programs with much better ratings that are
reasonably accessible and don't slow things down. Knowledgeable
people differ on whether Windows Defender is adequate and people
should read about the subject. When Kim Komando recommends that
people use something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well,
that in my opinion, is cause for serious consideration.

With reasonable care, Windows Defender may be alright but it has poor
detection rates compared with many programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Well, all anti virus programs tend to have one weakness, even if that is
that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down
stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as many, but
unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy
links
in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other products
on my
machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The pundits always
have
their favourites, and certainly do not have the added issues of
accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it is, as I'm
constantly
reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how
accessible
the program is. Many advisors say that it is better to use something
else
because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people
ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a
contraversy,
and what it is. I believe that those considering using the program
should
be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer
holiday
of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I
have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I
either
run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular
attention as
I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version)
accessible
with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with
alert
dialogs and settings windows.







Pete <emac00@...>
 

I have been using avira's antivir here for a while. Mostly accessible. my wife uses it also and she got that windows explorer virus wear explorer can't open files or folders any more. using it since windows 98 I think I got infections 2 may be 3 times. So may be not so good. last infection had to do with windows explorer and the infection changed characters to strange symbols.

Laurie Mehta
 

Which programs are those, specifically, please?
Thanks (and apologies if you've already shared this information; I'm a bit behind on reading list mail.
-LM

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 3/7/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:


What I meant to say is that
there are other
antimalware programs with much better ratings.
 
Gene

----- Original message
-----


From: Gene
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 6:11 AM
To: nvda@groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


There are other e-mail
programs with much better
ratings that are reasonably accessible and don't slow
things down. 
Knowledgeable people differ on whether Windows Defender is
adequate and people
should read about the subject.  When Kim Komando recommends
that people use
something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well,
that in my opinion, is
cause for serious consideration. 
 
With reasonable care,
Windows Defender may be
alright but it has poor detection rates compared with many
programs.
 
Gene

----- Original Message
-----


From: Brian's
Mail list account
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
To: nvda@groups.io

Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Well, all anti virus programs
tend to have  one weakness,
even if that is
that you cannot actually
use it with a screenreader or it
slows down stuff.

I have to
say that msse/defender is maybe not as
featured as  many, but
unless you are the
sort of person who goes
recklessly clicking dodgy links
in phishing
emails or web sites, thus far
checks with other products on my
machines
have not revealed anything very
malicious. The pundits always have
their
favourites, and certainly do not
have the added issues of
accessibility, but
we have to live in the world as
it is, as I'm constantly
reminded, so
compromise is often what one ends up
with.
 Brian

bglists@...
Sent via
blueyonder.
Please address personal email
to:-
briang1@...,
putting
'Brian Gaff'
in the display name
field.
----- Original Message -----

From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07,
2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda]
Antivirus


As has been repeatedly
discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible

the program is. 
Many advisors say that it is better to use something else

because it isn't
as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me
that this program is contraversial enough that when people

ask about it,
those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy,

and what it
is.  I believe that those considering using the program
should
be
encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message
-----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda]
Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and
10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria
[mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent:
March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda]
Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's
working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016
3:39 AM,
Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

  Hi all,

 
I'm thinking of
upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday

of this year, and
I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I

have Sandboxie and
VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either

run them in
Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular
attention as
I do have
access to a licensed copy through my university.

  If Windows
Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version)
accessible
with NVDA? In
terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert

dialogs and
settings windows.

Gene
 

I don't keep up carefully with which programs are accessible and are highly rated.  Other list members may want to comment.  Nodd32, spelling) is a program you have to pay for but, as far as I know it is rather accessible.  I'm not talking about the suite, I'm talking about the Nodd antivirus program.  I don't know anything about the Internet suite.
 
Avast was more or less accessible nbut more so with JAWS and it had enough quirks that you might not want to use it.  I use it but its quirks would probably dissuade many. 
 
Malware Bytes, after being inaccessible for a time, is, as far as I know more or less accessible now.  However, someone who has kept up with the last version or two will have to comment on that. 
 
Others may wish to comment on other programs.  I've seen favorable comments on two or three other programs a month or two ago here.
 
Gene

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 3:30 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Which programs are those, specifically, please?
Thanks (and apologies if you've already shared this information; I'm a bit behind on reading list mail.
-LM

--------------------------------------------
On Mon, 3/7/16, Gene <gsasner@...> wrote:

 
 What I meant to say is that
 there are other
 antimalware programs with much better ratings.
  
 Gene
 
 ----- Original message
 -----
 
 
 From: Gene
 Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 6:11 AM
 To: nvda@groups.io
 
 Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus
 
 
 There are other e-mail
 programs with much better
 ratings that are reasonably accessible and don't slow
 things down. 
 Knowledgeable people differ on whether Windows Defender is
 adequate and people
 should read about the subject.  When Kim Komando recommends
 that people use
 something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well,
 that in my opinion, is
 cause for serious consideration. 
  
 With reasonable care,
 Windows Defender may be
 alright but it has poor detection rates compared with many
 programs.
  
 Gene
 
 ----- Original Message
 -----
 
 
 From: Brian's
 Mail list account
 Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
 To: nvda@groups.io
 
 Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus
 
 Well, all anti virus programs
 tend to have  one weakness,
 even if that is
 that you cannot actually
 use it with a screenreader or it
 slows down stuff.
 
 I have to
 say that msse/defender is maybe not as
 featured as  many, but
 unless you are the
 sort of person who goes
 recklessly clicking dodgy links
 in phishing
 emails or web sites, thus far
 checks with other products on my
 machines
 have not revealed anything very
 malicious. The pundits always have
 their
 favourites, and certainly do not
 have the added issues of
 accessibility, but
 we have to live in the world as
 it is, as I'm constantly
 reminded, so
 compromise is often what one ends up
 with.
  Brian
 
 bglists@...
 Sent via
 blueyonder.
 Please address personal email
 to:-
 briang1@...,
 putting
 'Brian Gaff'
 in the display name
 field.
 ----- Original Message -----
 
 From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
 To: <nvda@groups.io>
 Sent: Monday, March 07,
 2016 5:42 AM
 Subject: Re: [nvda]
 Antivirus
 
 
 As has been repeatedly
 discussed here, it's not a question of how accessible
 
 the program is. 
 Many advisors say that it is better to use something else
 
 because it isn't
 as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.
 
 It seems to me
 that this program is contraversial enough that when people
 
 ask about it,
 those who discuss it should say that there is a contraversy,
 
 and what it
 is.  I believe that those considering using the program
 should
 be
 encouraged to look into the contraversy.
 
 Gene
 ----- Original Message
 -----
 
 From: Arlene
 Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
 To: nvda@groups.io
 Subject: Re: [nvda]
 Antivirus
 
 
 Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and
 10.
 
 
 
 From: Rosemarie Chavarria
 [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
 Sent:
 March-06-16 4:41 PM
 To: nvda@groups.io
 Subject: Re: [nvda]
 Antivirus
 
 
 
 Hi, Nut,
 
 I'm using windows defender and it's
 working great for me.
 
 Rosemarie
 
 
 
 
 On 3/6/2016
 3:39 AM,
 Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:
 
   Hi all,
 
  
 I'm thinking of
 upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer holiday
 
 of this year, and
 I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I
 
 have Sandboxie and
 VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I either
 
 run them in
 Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular
 attention as
 I do have
 access to a licensed copy through my university.
 
   If Windows
 Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version)
 accessible
 with NVDA? In
 terms of being able to read and properly interact with alert
 
 dialogs and
 settings windows.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 

The number of "pure" antivirus programs along with antivirus as a part of security suites has become ridiculously large.  You will also find, if you research ratings at length, that while there is a short list of 10 to 15 that consistently get top ratings that if you pay attention to how the ratings are performed (and that does vary) that it still throws into question whether you have a real answer to which program is best.

I have said before, and I will say again, that you should not be relying on antivirus programs to give you 100% protection from viruses as any new computer virus has the potential to make its way to your computer before it has been identified and the signatures for that virus get added to a given antivirus program's detection list.  The best defense is simply being careful about where you browse on the web and what you open in terms of e-mail attachments.  Never open messages that "seem fishy" to you based upon the subject not being in character for the person you've received it from or things coming in from an unknown recipient.

You can actually get a pretty decent idea about your browsing and e-mail hygiene based upon two things:

  1. Have you ever been infected and, if so, how frequently?
  2. Has your antivirus program ever reported an infection to you? [You could also check the log files regarding what, if anything, has been detected/quarantined.]

If you're never getting (or very, very seldom) getting infected and your existing antivirus isn't quarantining things on a frequent basis then your own behavior is already consistent with what's wise for avoiding infection.   If this is the case, pretty much all of the commercial antivirus programs, including Microsoft Security Essentials (for those still on Win7) or Windows Defender (Win8 and later), will prove to be more than adequate to give you the protection you need.

It's also wise to have an antimalware program (e.g., Malwarebytes) and an antispyware program (e.g., Spywareblaster or SuperAntiSpyware) since viruses, malware, and spyware are not the same thing and many antivirus programs don't look at anything but viruses and closely related attacks.

Another excellent program to have on your computer if you like to download software, even from reputable sources, to give it a try is Unchecky.  Pretty much all vendors are now getting into the loathsome practice of bundling, where they'll have things like toolbars, other programs, or the like bundled with the program that you actually want and if you are not careful to uncheck the checkboxes for things such as, "Install crazy toolbar as well," or, "Install free trial of premium version" [when what you really want and need is simply the free version of something], you end up with all sorts of crud on your computer that you really don't want.  I recently had to uninstall a lot of unwanted programs on a client's computer that got there because he had one of his children assist him and neither one of them were at all vigilant about the questions asked during installation and simply answered in the affirmative to all of them.  Unchecky will notify you about what it's unchecked and you have the option to recheck anything if that's what you want.  So far no one has told me there are any accessibility problems with Unchecky.

Brian


Nimer Jaber
 

Hello,

I am writing this not from my Admin hat, although the way this thread degenerates may or may not change that.

MSE is very poorly rated on many levels, and it is my belief that telling a user that it is sufficient to run it along with safe computer practices is just inaccurate.  It is very possible and likely to contract computer infections even if one practices all safe behavior. It no longer just takes a user engaging in risky behaviors to get malware on a machine, and moreover even if it did and this was the only way of contracting malware, this would mean that your expectation is that a human is 100% safe and will do the right thing 100% of the time, which is wildly inaccurate in my opinion. And even if you disagree with what I am stating, having this debate about whether MSE is sufficient or not every single week won't help us get any closer to deciding whether a user should use it. MSE is accessible and Windows Defender is included in newer versions of Windows. For you, this may be a reason to use it along with your safer practices of computing. I'm okay with that if your decision is to do so, however MSE is very, very poorly rated on many levels by a multitude of tests that I can link to if anybody is interested, and from a security perspective, it is irresponsible to tell a user that MSE is good enough if they stay safe.

Anyway, a good wiki article about tools that work with NVDA and a campaign to work with security vendors on this accessibility would not be a bad idea. I will list some tools that I know about that are accessible.

Eset Security Suite Version 8 (9 is not accessible, and the company is aware and says they are working on a fix)
Vipre Security Suite
I believe some reported that AVG is somewhat accessible.
Also, I believe that someone reported that Kaspersky is accessible once you get past the installer which is inaccessible.

I use Sophos Home Cloud Anti-virus. It is my favorite for many reasons. It is free, it is put out by a company that primarily secures larger companies, it is cloud-based and completely accessible, and it doesn't pack in a bunch of other products in a security suite that I do not require.
Spybot S&D and Spyware Blaster seem to work pretty well. Malware Bytes also works well. I use WinPatrol, and that adds an extra level of security, although I am rethinking this as it seems to be redundant to UAC.
I'm sure others can list other accessible products. Unfortunately, I wish that others would be more accessible, however they are not at this time.

Thanks.

On 3/7/2016 4:08 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

The number of "pure" antivirus programs along with antivirus as a part of security suites has become ridiculously large.  You will also find, if you research ratings at length, that while there is a short list of 10 to 15 that consistently get top ratings that if you pay attention to how the ratings are performed (and that does vary) that it still throws into question whether you have a real answer to which program is best.

I have said before, and I will say again, that you should not be relying on antivirus programs to give you 100% protection from viruses as any new computer virus has the potential to make its way to your computer before it has been identified and the signatures for that virus get added to a given antivirus program's detection list.  The best defense is simply being careful about where you browse on the web and what you open in terms of e-mail attachments.  Never open messages that "seem fishy" to you based upon the subject not being in character for the person you've received it from or things coming in from an unknown recipient.

You can actually get a pretty decent idea about your browsing and e-mail hygiene based upon two things:

  1. Have you ever been infected and, if so, how frequently?
  2. Has your antivirus program ever reported an infection to you? [You could also check the log files regarding what, if anything, has been detected/quarantined.]

If you're never getting (or very, very seldom) getting infected and your existing antivirus isn't quarantining things on a frequent basis then your own behavior is already consistent with what's wise for avoiding infection.   If this is the case, pretty much all of the commercial antivirus programs, including Microsoft Security Essentials (for those still on Win7) or Windows Defender (Win8 and later), will prove to be more than adequate to give you the protection you need.

It's also wise to have an antimalware program (e.g., Malwarebytes) and an antispyware program (e.g., Spywareblaster or SuperAntiSpyware) since viruses, malware, and spyware are not the same thing and many antivirus programs don't look at anything but viruses and closely related attacks.

Another excellent program to have on your computer if you like to download software, even from reputable sources, to give it a try is Unchecky.  Pretty much all vendors are now getting into the loathsome practice of bundling, where they'll have things like toolbars, other programs, or the like bundled with the program that you actually want and if you are not careful to uncheck the checkboxes for things such as, "Install crazy toolbar as well," or, "Install free trial of premium version" [when what you really want and need is simply the free version of something], you end up with all sorts of crud on your computer that you really don't want.  I recently had to uninstall a lot of unwanted programs on a client's computer that got there because he had one of his children assist him and neither one of them were at all vigilant about the questions asked during installation and simply answered in the affirmative to all of them.  Unchecky will notify you about what it's unchecked and you have the option to recheck anything if that's what you want.  So far no one has told me there are any accessibility problems with Unchecky.

Brian



Gene
 

Of course an antivirus program cannot give 100 percent protection.  But although there are a lot of them, accessibility is not at all guaranteed. 
Also, you should have something protecting you with active protection.  Just being careful can give a good deal of protection but it will not protect you against a reputable site that has been hacked and has become temporarily malicious.  Even the New york times had an incident at some point during the last year or two where advertising on the site was hacked and tried to download malware to peoples' computers.  And there have been many reputable publications that have published articles concerning one or more reputable studies that have shown that putatively safe sites cannot be assumed to be safe because of hacking and practices that aren't as careful as they should be.
 
Which is an important reason I don't allow scripts to run on sites unless they are necessary for how I want to use the site.  Many sites require scripts to do what you want them to do but many sites can be used without scripts for any of their functions.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 4:08 PM
Subject: [nvda] Re: Antivirus

The number of "pure" antivirus programs along with antivirus as a part of security suites has become ridiculously large.  You will also find, if you research ratings at length, that while there is a short list of 10 to 15 that consistently get top ratings that if you pay attention to how the ratings are performed (and that does vary) that it still throws into question whether you have a real answer to which program is best.

I have said before, and I will say again, that you should not be relying on antivirus programs to give you 100% protection from viruses as any new computer virus has the potential to make its way to your computer before it has been identified and the signatures for that virus get added to a given antivirus program's detection list.  The best defense is simply being careful about where you browse on the web and what you open in terms of e-mail attachments.  Never open messages that "seem fishy" to you based upon the subject not being in character for the person you've received it from or things coming in from an unknown recipient.

You can actually get a pretty decent idea about your browsing and e-mail hygiene based upon two things:

  1. Have you ever been infected and, if so, how frequently?
  2. Has your antivirus program ever reported an infection to you? [You could also check the log files regarding what, if anything, has been detected/quarantined.]

If you're never getting (or very, very seldom) getting infected and your existing antivirus isn't quarantining things on a frequent basis then your own behavior is already consistent with what's wise for avoiding infection.   If this is the case, pretty much all of the commercial antivirus programs, including Microsoft Security Essentials (for those still on Win7) or Windows Defender (Win8 and later), will prove to be more than adequate to give you the protection you need.

It's also wise to have an antimalware program (e.g., Malwarebytes) and an antispyware program (e.g., Spywareblaster or SuperAntiSpyware) since viruses, malware, and spyware are not the same thing and many antivirus programs don't look at anything but viruses and closely related attacks.

Another excellent program to have on your computer if you like to download software, even from reputable sources, to give it a try is Unchecky.  Pretty much all vendors are now getting into the loathsome practice of bundling, where they'll have things like toolbars, other programs, or the like bundled with the program that you actually want and if you are not careful to uncheck the checkboxes for things such as, "Install crazy toolbar as well," or, "Install free trial of premium version" [when what you really want and need is simply the free version of something], you end up with all sorts of crud on your computer that you really don't want.  I recently had to uninstall a lot of unwanted programs on a client's computer that got there because he had one of his children assist him and neither one of them were at all vigilant about the questions asked during installation and simply answered in the affirmative to all of them.  Unchecky will notify you about what it's unchecked and you have the option to recheck anything if that's what you want.  So far no one has told me there are any accessibility problems with Unchecky.

Brian


Kwork
 


Nimer, thank you for this reply, and for your thoughts. Due to smart browsing habits, I haven't been infected while only using MSE on Win 7 for my antivirus. However I am looking for a new one, and your thoughts on Sophos are good as I'm looking for something that isn't resource intensive on this old computer that will still do the job right, and is NVDA accessible. MalwareBytes has saved my life a few times, and so has Unchecky for installing programs. While it doesn't catch everything, it does a pretty good job, and is completely accessible.
You mentioned Spybot. Is that still accessible? I had heard that it broke for us in recent versions, but am willing to give it another try if things have improved once again.
Travis

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 3:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Hello,

I am writing this not from my Admin hat, although the way this thread degenerates may or may not change that.

MSE is very poorly rated on many levels, and it is my belief that telling a user that it is sufficient to run it along with safe computer practices is just inaccurate.  It is very possible and likely to contract computer infections even if one practices all safe behavior. It no longer just takes a user engaging in risky behaviors to get malware on a machine, and moreover even if it did and this was the only way of contracting malware, this would mean that your expectation is that a human is 100% safe and will do the right thing 100% of the time, which is wildly inaccurate in my opinion. And even if you disagree with what I am stating, having this debate about whether MSE is sufficient or not every single week won't help us get any closer to deciding whether a user should use it. MSE is accessible and Windows Defender is included in newer versions of Windows. For you, this may be a reason to use it along with your safer practices of computing. I'm okay with that if your decision is to do so, however MSE is very, very poorly rated on many levels by a multitude of tests that I can link to if anybody is interested, and from a security perspective, it is irresponsible to tell a user that MSE is good enough if they stay safe.

Anyway, a good wiki article about tools that work with NVDA and a campaign to work with security vendors on this accessibility would not be a bad idea. I will list some tools that I know about that are accessible.

Eset Security Suite Version 8 (9 is not accessible, and the company is aware and says they are working on a fix)
Vipre Security Suite
I believe some reported that AVG is somewhat accessible.
Also, I believe that someone reported that Kaspersky is accessible once you get past the installer which is inaccessible.

I use Sophos Home Cloud Anti-virus. It is my favorite for many reasons. It is free, it is put out by a company that primarily secures larger companies, it is cloud-based and completely accessible, and it doesn't pack in a bunch of other products in a security suite that I do not require.
Spybot S&D and Spyware Blaster seem to work pretty well. Malware Bytes also works well. I use WinPatrol, and that adds an extra level of security, although I am rethinking this as it seems to be redundant to UAC.
I'm sure others can list other accessible products. Unfortunately, I wish that others would be more accessible, however they are not at this time.

Thanks.

On 3/7/2016 4:08 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

The number of "pure" antivirus programs along with antivirus as a part of security suites has become ridiculously large.  You will also find, if you research ratings at length, that while there is a short list of 10 to 15 that consistently get top ratings that if you pay attention to how the ratings are performed (and that does vary) that it still throws into question whether you have a real answer to which program is best.

I have said before, and I will say again, that you should not be relying on antivirus programs to give you 100% protection from viruses as any new computer virus has the potential to make its way to your computer before it has been identified and the signatures for that virus get added to a given antivirus program's detection list.  The best defense is simply being careful about where you browse on the web and what you open in terms of e-mail attachments.  Never open messages that "seem fishy" to you based upon the subject not being in character for the person you've received it from or things coming in from an unknown recipient.

You can actually get a pretty decent idea about your browsing and e-mail hygiene based upon two things:

  1. Have you ever been infected and, if so, how frequently?
  2. Has your antivirus program ever reported an infection to you? [You could also check the log files regarding what, if anything, has been detected/quarantined.]

If you're never getting (or very, very seldom) getting infected and your existing antivirus isn't quarantining things on a frequent basis then your own behavior is already consistent with what's wise for avoiding infection.   If this is the case, pretty much all of the commercial antivirus programs, including Microsoft Security Essentials (for those still on Win7) or Windows Defender (Win8 and later), will prove to be more than adequate to give you the protection you need.

It's also wise to have an antimalware program (e.g., Malwarebytes) and an antispyware program (e.g., Spywareblaster or SuperAntiSpyware) since viruses, malware, and spyware are not the same thing and many antivirus programs don't look at anything but viruses and closely related attacks.

Another excellent program to have on your computer if you like to download software, even from reputable sources, to give it a try is Unchecky.  Pretty much all vendors are now getting into the loathsome practice of bundling, where they'll have things like toolbars, other programs, or the like bundled with the program that you actually want and if you are not careful to uncheck the checkboxes for things such as, "Install crazy toolbar as well," or, "Install free trial of premium version" [when what you really want and need is simply the free version of something], you end up with all sorts of crud on your computer that you really don't want.  I recently had to uninstall a lot of unwanted programs on a client's computer that got there because he had one of his children assist him and neither one of them were at all vigilant about the questions asked during installation and simply answered in the affirmative to all of them.  Unchecky will notify you about what it's unchecked and you have the option to recheck anything if that's what you want.  So far no one has told me there are any accessibility problems with Unchecky.

Brian



 

On Mon, Mar 7, 2016 at 02:25 pm, Nimer Jaber <nimerjaber1@...> wrote:
MSE is very poorly rated on many levels, and it is my belief that telling a user that it is sufficient to run it along with safe computer practices is just inaccurate.  It is very possible and likely to contract computer infections even if one practices all safe behavior.

 Nimer,

             I will simply state that this does not match either my personal experience nor that of many clients that I have using Windows Defender (and some using Microsoft Security Essentials).   I'll never have a large enough sample for a scientific study, but fear of both MSE and Windows Defender is, in my experience and opinion, hugely overblown.

Brian

Kevin Cussick
 

good post, I use the same as you as it was you that let us know about it. I can't remember if you put vipper in the list I may have the spelling wrong as nvda seems to think I do thanks for your indulgence.

On 07/03/2016 22:25, Nimer Jaber wrote:
Hello,

I am writing this not from my Admin hat, although the way this thread
degenerates may or may not change that.

MSE is very poorly rated on many levels, and it is my belief that
telling a user that it is sufficient to run it along with safe computer
practices is just inaccurate. It is very possible and likely to
contract computer infections even if one practices all safe behavior. It
no longer just takes a user engaging in risky behaviors to get malware
on a machine, and moreover even if it did and this was the only way of
contracting malware, this would mean that your expectation is that a
human is 100% safe and will do the right thing 100% of the time, which
is wildly inaccurate in my opinion. And even if you disagree with what I
am stating, having this debate about whether MSE is sufficient or not
every single week won't help us get any closer to deciding whether a
user should use it. MSE is accessible and Windows Defender is included
in newer versions of Windows. For you, this may be a reason to use it
along with your safer practices of computing. I'm okay with that if your
decision is to do so, however MSE is very, very poorly rated on many
levels by a multitude of tests that I can link to if anybody is
interested, and from a security perspective, it is irresponsible to tell
a user that MSE is good enough if they stay safe.

Anyway, a good wiki article about tools that work with NVDA and a
campaign to work with security vendors on this accessibility would not
be a bad idea. I will list some tools that I know about that are accessible.

Eset Security Suite Version 8 (9 is not accessible, and the company is
aware and says they are working on a fix)
Vipre Security Suite
I believe some reported that AVG is somewhat accessible.
Also, I believe that someone reported that Kaspersky is accessible once
you get past the installer which is inaccessible.

I use Sophos Home Cloud Anti-virus. It is my favorite for many reasons.
It is free, it is put out by a company that primarily secures larger
companies, it is cloud-based and completely accessible, and it doesn't
pack in a bunch of other products in a security suite that I do not require.
Spybot S&D and Spyware Blaster seem to work pretty well. Malware Bytes
also works well. I use WinPatrol, and that adds an extra level of
security, although I am rethinking this as it seems to be redundant to UAC.
I'm sure others can list other accessible products. Unfortunately, I
wish that others would be more accessible, however they are not at this
time.

Thanks.

On 3/7/2016 4:08 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:

The number of "pure" antivirus programs along with antivirus as a part
of security suites has become ridiculously large. You will also find,
if you research ratings at length, that while there is a short list of
10 to 15 that consistently get top ratings that if you pay attention
to how the ratings are performed (and that does vary) that it still
throws into question whether you have a real answer to which program
is best.

I have said before, and I will say again, that you should not be
relying on antivirus programs to give you 100% protection from viruses
as any new computer virus has the potential to make its way to your
computer before it has been identified and the signatures for that
virus get added to a given antivirus program's detection list. The
best defense is simply being careful about where you browse on the web
and what you open in terms of e-mail attachments. Never open messages
that "seem fishy" to you based upon the subject not being in character
for the person you've received it from or things coming in from an
unknown recipient.

You can actually get a pretty decent idea about your browsing and
e-mail hygiene based upon two things:

1. Have you ever been infected and, if so, how frequently?
2. Has your antivirus program ever reported an infection to you? [You
could also check the log files regarding what, if anything, has
been detected/quarantined.]

If you're never getting (or very, very seldom) getting infected and
your existing antivirus isn't quarantining things on a frequent basis
then your own behavior is already consistent with what's wise for
avoiding infection. If this is the case, pretty much all of the
commercial antivirus programs, including Microsoft Security Essentials
(for those still on Win7) or Windows Defender (Win8 and later), will
prove to be more than adequate to give you the protection you need.

It's also wise to have an antimalware program (e.g., Malwarebytes
<https://www.malwarebytes.org/>) and an antispyware program (e.g.,
Spywareblaster <https://www.brightfort.com/spywareblaster.html> or
SuperAntiSpyware <http://superantispyware.com/>) since viruses,
malware, and spyware are not the same thing and many antivirus
programs don't look at anything but viruses and closely related attacks.

Another excellent program to have on your computer if you like to
download software, even from reputable sources, to give it a try is
Unchecky <https://unchecky.com/>. Pretty much all vendors are now
getting into the loathsome practice of bundling, where they'll have
things like toolbars, other programs, or the like bundled with the
program that you actually want and if you are not careful to uncheck
the checkboxes for things such as, "Install crazy toolbar as well,"
or, "Install free trial of premium version" [when what you really want
and need is simply the free version of something], you end up with all
sorts of crud on your computer that you really don't want. I recently
had to uninstall a lot of unwanted programs on a client's computer
that got there because he had one of his children assist him and
neither one of them were at all vigilant about the questions asked
during installation and simply answered in the affirmative to all of
them. Unchecky will notify you about what it's unchecked and you have
the option to recheck anything if that's what you want. So far no one
has told me there are any accessibility problems with Unchecky.

Brian

marvin kotler
 

This is Marv here. One thing I have noticed over the years regarding some antivirus programs is that they interfere with system restore. Surprisingly, windows defender does not do this. Just something else to consider when looking for a program.-----Original Message-----
From: Angela Delicata via Groups.io
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:04 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus

Hi,
I use eset nod32.


Il 07/03/2016 13:33, Kevin Cussick via Groups.io ha scritto:
I am using sophus and after a bit of a shaky start I now have it on 3 of
my many computers and it is Ok seems to be fully accessible. I admit I
have not looked around to see what the ratings are like but I might now
that I have thought about it.

On 07/03/2016 12:11, Gene wrote:
There are other e-mail programs with much better ratings that are
reasonably accessible and don't slow things down. Knowledgeable
people differ on whether Windows Defender is adequate and people
should read about the subject. When Kim Komando recommends that
people use something else and Ars Technica (spelling) does as well,
that in my opinion, is cause for serious consideration.

With reasonable care, Windows Defender may be alright but it has poor
detection rates compared with many programs.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Brian's Mail list account
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 2:12 AM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Well, all anti virus programs tend to have one weakness, even if that is
that you cannot actually use it with a screenreader or it slows down
stuff.

I have to say that msse/defender is maybe not as featured as many, but
unless you are the sort of person who goes recklessly clicking dodgy
links
in phishing emails or web sites, thus far checks with other products
on my
machines have not revealed anything very malicious. The pundits always
have
their favourites, and certainly do not have the added issues of
accessibility, but we have to live in the world as it is, as I'm
constantly
reminded, so compromise is often what one ends up with.
Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal email to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, March 07, 2016 5:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


As has been repeatedly discussed here, it's not a question of how
accessible
the program is. Many advisors say that it is better to use something
else
because it isn't as good at detecting malware as they think it should be.

It seems to me that this program is contraversial enough that when people
ask about it, those who discuss it should say that there is a
contraversy,
and what it is. I believe that those considering using the program
should
be encouraged to look into the contraversy.

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Arlene
Sent: Sunday, March 06, 2016 9:52 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus


Yes, I hear it works well for 8 and 10.



From: Rosemarie Chavarria [mailto:knitqueen2007@...]
Sent: March-06-16 4:41 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Antivirus



Hi, Nut,

I'm using windows defender and it's working great for me.

Rosemarie




On 3/6/2016 3:39 AM, Supanut Leepaisomboon wrote:

Hi all,

I'm thinking of upgrading to Windows 10, probably during my summer
holiday
of this year, and I'm wondering, will Windows Defender be good enough? I
have Sandboxie and VMware installed (anything I think is suspicious I
either
run them in Sandboxie or VMware). I'm giving Nod32 a particular
attention as
I do have access to a licensed copy through my university.

If Windows Defender is not good enough, is Nod32 (any version)
accessible
with NVDA? In terms of being able to read and properly interact with
alert
dialogs and settings windows.