backing up NVDA settings


Don H
 

Running latest NVDA on latest Win10 system. Totally my fault I hit some unknown key combinations that messed up my NVDA settings. Then I did the totally wrong thing and restarted NVDA which caused my messed up settings to be saved. Is there a file or folder that can be backed up to save your NVDA settings? This would save dummies like from me from losing the good settings.
Thanks


 

I'm pretty sure that there is either a file, or folder, that can be copied off somewhere if one so desires, but I'll let someone else fill in that part.

Given the recent conversation about this very behavior, which is that NVDA saves all settings changed upon exit or restart, it's vital that folks know about two things:

1.  The NVDA- + Ctrl + R command that restores your settings to whatever they were when you first fired up NVDA provided you, yourself, didn't manually save them somewhere along the way. if you did save them somewhere along the way, then they will revert to that last save point. If you hit it 3 times in rapid succession it reverts to NVDA factory defaults.

2.  That you can turn the "Save on exit or restart," behavior off in settings, if you so choose, and use NVDA + CTRL + C to save your changes manually instead.  Even if automatic save is on, if you want to save settings you've already changed, because you know that those suit you, this is the command that does this.  All settings changed afterward will remain unsaved until "a saving event" occurs, be that an automatic save on exit or a manual invocation of the NVDA + CTRL + C command.

There is just no way that any given default setting is going to make everyone happy.  You, the generic you, need to understand what the NVDA default behavior is (even were that to change) with regard to how and when settings changes are permanently saved and "behave accordingly" based on what you have elected to keep or change about the settings change saving behavior.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

Don,

See archive message  for the steps to back up the NVDA settings folder.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Chris
 

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

 

From: Don H
Sent: 17 January 2022 16:49
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

Running latest NVDA on latest Win10 system.  Totally my fault I hit some

unknown key combinations that messed up my NVDA settings.  Then I did

the totally wrong thing and restarted NVDA which caused my messed up

settings to be saved.  Is there a file or folder that can be backed up

to save your NVDA settings?  This would save dummies like from me from

losing the good settings.

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 


Gene
 
Edited

If you uncheck that option you won't accidentally save settings except if you revert to factory  settings, for some reason, then shut down NVDA or shut down Windows or the computer spontaneously restarts.  It is still possible to accidentally save settings when you revert to factory defaults.  To avoid saving settings on shutdown, you need to return to the saved configuration with NVDA + CTRL + R before doing something that closes NVDA. 

 

Gene

On 1/17/2022 11:10 AM, Chris via groups.io wrote:

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

 

 

From: Don H
Sent: 17 January 2022 16:49
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

Running latest NVDA on latest Win10 system.  Totally my fault I hit some

unknown key combinations that messed up my NVDA settings.  Then I did

the totally wrong thing and restarted NVDA which caused my messed up

settings to be saved.  Is there a file or folder that can be backed up

to save your NVDA settings?  This would save dummies like from me from

losing the good settings.

Thanks

 

 

 

 

 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Lol. Not just the dummies but the ones who I think the say is fat finger, or in my case butter fingers stuff. I thought ther was an ini or folder somewhere in %appdata% but I can't recall now.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Don H
Sent: Monday, January 17, 2022 8:45 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

Running latest NVDA on latest Win10 system. Totally my fault I hit some unknown key combinations that messed up my NVDA settings. Then I did the totally wrong thing and restarted NVDA which caused my messed up settings to be saved. Is there a file or folder that can be backed up to save your NVDA settings? This would save dummies like from me from losing the good settings.
Thanks


Sarah k Alawami
 

Oh squeak! Thanks! I’ll also be taking a look. Hopefully this procedure will remain the same throughout nvda versions.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, January 17, 2022 9:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

Don,

See archive message  for the steps to back up the NVDA settings folder.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Just to add I’m probably going to write a batch file to at least start the xcopy process. This is actually good for when I know I have settings right and then I can use the reverse xcopy command to, well, undo my fat finger changes.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, January 17, 2022 9:03 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

Don,

See archive message  for the steps to back up the NVDA settings folder.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:10 PM, Chris wrote:

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

-
I am not trying to argue your central point, which is entirely valid, but I can say that I have seen, on more than one occasion, where those who've turned automatic save off wail mightily when hours of settings tweaks end up not being saved because they forgot to save them.

In the end, it is critical that you (the generic you), know and understand precisely how your NVDA on your machine(s) is configured.  It's the only way you can know what's necessary to either make sure that what you're doing is going to have the result you expect.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:55 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
Hopefully this procedure will remain the same throughout nvda versions.
-
The use of the individual user's %AppData% folder as the default location for "all things NVDA related to that user" has been the same for as long as I've been dealing with NVDA, so I don't expect it to change unless some really radical rewrite were to take place.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 01:01 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:
Just to add I’m probably going to write a batch file to at least start the xcopy process.
-
If what you create is specific to backing up the NVDA settings, I would encourage you to share it here.

There are many who've never used XCOPY or ROBOCOPY and an example specific to keeping an archived copy of your personal NVDA settings is definitely on-topic for this group.

Some also use the method of creating a fresh portable copy with all their current settings as a backup method, as you can snag the settings back from the portable copy.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:18 PM, Gene wrote:
To avoid saving settings on shutdown, you need to return to the saved configuration with NVDA+R before doing something that closes NVDA. 
-
I know that this is a typo, but for the sake of archival correctness, you mean NVDA + CTRL + R.  The command you gave invokes NVDA OCR.

I will correct the original post in the archive as well.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Gene
 

That could certainly happen.  Perhaps the best way to approach the problem is to keep the default behavior but have a dialog come up asking if you want to save the changes when the program shuts down.  That is a solution to the problem I thought of when discussing the question in the Github issue.


Gene

On 1/17/2022 12:08 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:10 PM, Chris wrote:

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

-
I am not trying to argue your central point, which is entirely valid, but I can say that I have seen, on more than one occasion, where those who've turned automatic save off wail mightily when hours of settings tweaks end up not being saved because they forgot to save them.

In the end, it is critical that you (the generic you), know and understand precisely how your NVDA on your machine(s) is configured.  It's the only way you can know what's necessary to either make sure that what you're doing is going to have the result you expect.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Gene
 

Yes, I forgot to include control.


No matter how well you know a command, sometimes, you might still write it incorrectly and not catch the mistake when reviewing the message before sending.


Gene

On 1/17/2022 12:16 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:18 PM, Gene wrote:
To avoid saving settings on shutdown, you need to return to the saved configuration with NVDA+R before doing something that closes NVDA. 
-
I know that this is a typo, but for the sake of archival correctness, you mean NVDA + CTRL + R.  The command you gave invokes NVDA OCR.

I will correct the original post in the archive as well.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

I still like to save automatically.

However once you have your changes and defaults you probably are not going to do to much.

Maybe have an option in nvda or an addon which will target your nvda or all the nvdas settings if there is more than 1 account and have separate zip files or maybe make a file called nvda-settings similar to nvda-addon as part of nvda itself.

If an nvda-settings file is clicked you will be asked to restore addons and settings.

Of course that could become a problem if things changed.

Or simply have backups of settings, addons or both.

The other thing is to have something able to make a zipped backup for placing onto a cloud storage.

Of course if nvda supports the major storage mediums, dropbox, google drive and 1 drive then that would be fine to.

Of course you could just zip the entire folder up.

I personally have no issue reinstalling addons which I do keep backed up and resetting settings but then I have little in the way of profiles that need anything complex.

My settings are duplicated minus addons on all the systems I use.

The other way is to create a portable with your configuration file coppied.

Maybe an option could be added to installs from portable stating copy settings, addons, etc from your portable when installing to.

That could be its own problem if you had a specialised portable but then you probably wouldn't want to install those.



On 18/01/2022 7:35 am, Gene wrote:

That could certainly happen.  Perhaps the best way to approach the problem is to keep the default behavior but have a dialog come up asking if you want to save the changes when the program shuts down.  That is a solution to the problem I thought of when discussing the question in the Github issue.


Gene

On 1/17/2022 12:08 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:10 PM, Chris wrote:

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

-
I am not trying to argue your central point, which is entirely valid, but I can say that I have seen, on more than one occasion, where those who've turned automatic save off wail mightily when hours of settings tweaks end up not being saved because they forgot to save them.

In the end, it is critical that you (the generic you), know and understand precisely how your NVDA on your machine(s) is configured.  It's the only way you can know what's necessary to either make sure that what you're doing is going to have the result you expect.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Sarah k Alawami
 

Yep more than one way to skin a cat and all. so  in the case of my folder and my name:

 

Xcopy "C:\Users\Sarah\AppData\Roaming\nvda" d:\dropbox\3backups\nvda then respond d , enter and away the copy goes.

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Monday, January 17, 2022 10:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 01:01 PM, Sarah k Alawami wrote:

Just to add I’m probably going to write a batch file to at least start the xcopy process.

-
If what you create is specific to backing up the NVDA settings, I would encourage you to share it here.

There are many who've never used XCOPY or ROBOCOPY and an example specific to keeping an archived copy of your personal NVDA settings is definitely on-topic for this group.

Some also use the method of creating a fresh portable copy with all their current settings as a backup method, as you can snag the settings back from the portable copy.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 01:35 PM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps the best way to approach the problem is to keep the default behavior but have a dialog come up asking if you want to save the changes when the program shuts down.
-
Not that this couldn't work, but I can only imagine how annoying it would be and, even worse, how people would go into "autopilot mode" in regard to it and still mess things up by giving their "automatic response" or taking whatever the default is.

Personally, I do not like dialogs to appear all the time for something like this, only when a state change has been detected.  And if you were implying it should only come up if a settings change was made, then that could work perfectly.  It would only nag when getting the user's attention about making a critical decision is required.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


Chris
 

But more often than not users are left scratching their arse when something that was working before shutting down and now its completely screwed up today!

 

How often have you heard that???

 

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: 17 January 2022 18:08
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:10 PM, Chris wrote:

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

-
I am not trying to argue your central point, which is entirely valid, but I can say that I have seen, on more than one occasion, where those who've turned automatic save off wail mightily when hours of settings tweaks end up not being saved because they forgot to save them.

In the end, it is critical that you (the generic you), know and understand precisely how your NVDA on your machine(s) is configured.  It's the only way you can know what's necessary to either make sure that what you're doing is going to have the result you expect.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 

 


Gene
 

That's what I have in mind, like the dialog in a word processor that only comes up when you close a document and don't save the changes.


Gene

On 1/17/2022 12:51 PM, Brian Vogel wrote:
On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 01:35 PM, Gene wrote:
Perhaps the best way to approach the problem is to keep the default behavior but have a dialog come up asking if you want to save the changes when the program shuts down.
-
Not that this couldn't work, but I can only imagine how annoying it would be and, even worse, how people would go into "autopilot mode" in regard to it and still mess things up by giving their "automatic response" or taking whatever the default is.

Personally, I do not like dialogs to appear all the time for something like this, only when a state change has been detected.  And if you were implying it should only come up if a settings change was made, then that could work perfectly.  It would only nag when getting the user's attention about making a critical decision is required.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)

 


 

Yeah, had that happen quite a lot.

I do a lot of repairs, if you can track it to a broken hardware, busted drivers, a user error, something like them wanting something and then getting a bunch of spyware and then having to fix that, that I can understand.

One user did that with a conference recorder.

He loaded a free one.

It wasn't free at all.

I pay for a conversion suite that has that functionality.

It was a snap to spend the 9 bucks to get him the right module.

I had the same with the same user with a busted wireless card, took out his sound drivers, user account a bunch of spyware got in.

The card was not only busted the manufacturer no longer existed.

But I have had users that load the same things constantly.

I had to give up on those.

I have also had users just well get stuff and are not sure where they went.

Even though I try the same command and can't find an error.

Users especially the alderly can get distracted with buttons even though they should not to push that button.

Teens can do things to.

A shared computer unless everyone can be trusted is a headake.

But I have my limits.

Generally unless I need to I won't spend 3 days on an issue.

If its broken and I can't fix it easilly, I tend to take it right back to basics.

Note down everythhing, get their software, reformat, then build it up updating and checking as I go.

Eventually I find the issue or fix issues as I go.

Especially if its a new system it forces me to see what needs doing and other things.

I have had a couple stories with one user that had updated but left everything at defaults so no wander it broke.

I have also had another user with a game I had to work round.


Both users refused a format.

So a repair job for both took me 2 weeks for one user and a month for the other.

I was payed and charged accordingly, but I could have had both systems up within a week if I had started from basics.

Its

It is worth knowing though that 1 reason I didn't insist to much was that both systems had spinning main drives and I wanted to just sort them.

My brother had one such system.

Was always going, being patched and holding.

However its neever needed a reinstall because it was up for like 24-7 well it never got reloaded though it clearly needed it.

Then it was just to old.


Then it just didn't turn on.

Maybe since my brother refuses to pick it up I will use it for a doorstop.



On 18/01/2022 7:54 am, Chris via groups.io wrote:

But more often than not users are left scratching their arse when something that was working before shutting down and now its completely screwed up today!

 

How often have you heard that???

 

 

From: Brian Vogel
Sent: 17 January 2022 18:08
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] backing up NVDA settings

 

On Mon, Jan 17, 2022 at 12:10 PM, Chris wrote:

Your best option in the first place would be to uncheck the option to save configuration on exit!

That way any accidental setting change would not be saved unless of course you save the configuration manually

-
I am not trying to argue your central point, which is entirely valid, but I can say that I have seen, on more than one occasion, where those who've turned automatic save off wail mightily when hours of settings tweaks end up not being saved because they forgot to save them.

In the end, it is critical that you (the generic you), know and understand precisely how your NVDA on your machine(s) is configured.  It's the only way you can know what's necessary to either make sure that what you're doing is going to have the result you expect.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The instinctive need to be the member of a closely-knit group fighting for common ideals may grow so strong that it becomes inessential what these ideals are.

       ~ Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989)