Topics

Changing to G-Chrome? Continued

David Russell
 

Hello NVDA group,

This is fascinating.
Within the last fifteen minutes, I sent myself an email from
Smashwords and pasted in part of the notice before and after the
hyperlink. NVDA reads the URL by saying the word link
https://www.smashwords.com and the info after the slash.

When pasting, the URL is read without the word link. When reading the
copy sent to myself, the link is there, and it works!

So, the idea of an email program saying yes or no to links, or a blog
saying yes or no to links, seems to still be the answer as to why some
see what I send as a link and others do not.
It baffles me.

--
David Russell
david.sonofhashem@...
"chilah phanim" Make G-d smile!

 

On Wed, Jan 9, 2019 at 02:01 PM, David Russell wrote:
When pasting, the URL is read without the word link. When reading the
copy sent to myself, the link is there, and it works!
This is typical behavior.   If you do not copy the link with a "Copy Link Location" command, or similar, or have a link that is presented as click-through text selected, then all you're getting is the link text, not the hyperlink.  If you select only the part of a link that comes after the https:// or http:// it will still be considered text, not a link.

The e-mail interface "linkifies" plain text that it recognizes as being presented in link format.  It's easy enough to try.  Type a list of URLs by hand.  In the compose window they will not be presented to you, the composer, as links.  Once the message is sent, and you're viewing it in the sent folder, they will (as they will for the receiver).

Copy http://www.washingtonpost.com in its entirety, from the H in http to the m in com, then paste it when composing.  You'll have a link.  Then afterward type out what comes after the http:// by hand.  In the compose window you'll have plain text for the second.  But once sent both will show up as links once "linkification" has been done on the second one by Gmail or an e-mail client.

If you copy and paste in a full hyperlink it will read as "link".  There's a difference between text that can be linkified and an actual link itself.  It's worked this way for as long as I can remember, and there was a time where "linkification" did not occur.  It was a new feature many moons ago.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

Brian's Mail list account
 

Yes I get annoyed by companies and organisations who seen me hidden links where the text merely says here as the link. I often need to make a script to be read out of the text in these emails which means I need to go to every link and cut and paste the address bar as well as the actual text into my document to be read. If you look at these emails in plain text often the link is not as the web site shows it, but is a huge tracking link hidden behind the text as the sender is trying to get metrics from the user as to what is the most popular areas of the web sit.

Brian

bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <@britechguy>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, January 09, 2019 9:20 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Changing to G-Chrome? Continued


On Wed, Jan 9, 2019 at 02:01 PM, David Russell wrote:


When pasting, the URL is read without the word link. When reading the
copy sent to myself, the link is there, and it works!
This is typical behavior. If you do not copy the link with a "Copy Link Location" command, or similar, or have a link that is presented as click-through text selected, then all you're getting is the link text, not the hyperlink. If you select only the part of a link that comes after the https:// or http:// it will still be considered text, not a link.

The e-mail interface "linkifies" plain text that it recognizes as being presented in link format. It's easy enough to try. Type a list of URLs by hand. In the compose window they will not be presented to you, the composer, as links. Once the message is sent, and you're viewing it in the sent folder, they will (as they will for the receiver).

Copy http://www.washingtonpost.com in its entirety, from the H in http to the m in com, then paste it when composing. You'll have a link. Then afterward type out what comes after the http:// by hand. In the compose window you'll have plain text for the second. But once sent both will show up as links once "linkification" has been done on the second one by Gmail or an e-mail client.

If you copy and paste in a full hyperlink it will read as "link". There's a difference between text that can be linkified and an actual link itself. It's worked this way for as long as I can remember, and there was a time where "linkification" did not occur. It was a new feature many moons ago.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back