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locked [chat] is it possible to access the BIOS with a screen reader


Clive May
 

Hi
In the days of DOS, there was a suite of utilities which would read the BIOS settings into a HEX file and write them back to the BIOS.  There was no utility, as far as I know,  to allow you to amend the file and, if there had been a way, I am uncertain if the settings could be put back successfully if the file was changed. 

 

On 18/12/2020 18:16, Howard Traxler wrote:
In the distant passed, I was successful dumping the screen to a Braille embosser through the parallel port each time I made a change.


On 12/18/2020 9:40 AM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Hey guys, Molly here.

In order to run my virtual machine it requires a change to the BIOS settings on my PC.

Can one access the BIOS without sighted assistance?

I am thinking not, because the BIOS comes up before Windows boots.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

My professor is looking into getting sighted assistance to help, but as my entire family has COVID we’re stuck at the moment.

Regards

Molly



Clive May
 

Hi


I believe it's a security matter. 


On 18/12/2020 18:22, Shaun Everiss wrote:

No, you will need to have someone with sight do that.

You'd think that there would be a reader now for bios, since the efi os is quite detailed.

On a probook I worked on it appeared like a menu driven program like you would see in a text editor like notepad, why it was never ported to windows is anyone's guess.

Toshiba did that in the day, first a menu then a control panel type program then an app.

One assumes it could be a universal but you need someone to ddo that for you.



On 19/12/2020 4:40 am, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Hey guys, Molly here.

In order to run my virtual machine it requires a change to the BIOS settings on my PC.

Can one access the BIOS without sighted assistance?

I am thinking not, because the BIOS comes up before Windows boots.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

My professor is looking into getting sighted assistance to help, but as my entire family has COVID we’re stuck at the moment.

Regards

Molly


Howard Traxler
 

In what memory location (address) are the BIOS values stored?  It seems that one could simply write a program to read that section of memory and display the content.  The next step would be to modify those values and write it all back to memory.

On 12/18/2020 1:39 PM, Clive May wrote:
Hi
In the days of DOS, there was a suite of utilities which would read the BIOS settings into a HEX file and write them back to the BIOS.  There was no utility, as far as I know,  to allow you to amend the file and, if there had been a way, I am uncertain if the settings could be put back successfully if the file was changed.


On 18/12/2020 18:16, Howard Traxler wrote:
In the distant passed, I was successful dumping the screen to a Braille embosser through the parallel port each time I made a change.


On 12/18/2020 9:40 AM, molly the blind tech lover wrote:

Hey guys, Molly here.

In order to run my virtual machine it requires a change to the BIOS settings on my PC.

Can one access the BIOS without sighted assistance?

I am thinking not, because the BIOS comes up before Windows boots.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

My professor is looking into getting sighted assistance to help, but as my entire family has COVID we’re stuck at the moment.

Regards

Molly


 

I do not know who elected to move this topic, appropriately originated on the Chat Subgroup, here, and I am presuming it is accidental.

That being said, this topic is now locked.  We absolutely know that BIOS/UEFI is not accessible using NVDA, JAWS, Narrator, or any of the other now out-of-support Windows platform screen readers.  It's not going to become so using any of those screen readers, because it can't, since UEFI/BIOS access must occur before Windows is running, and Windows must be running before the screen readers listed can run.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

[Regarding the Supreme Court refusing to hear the case brought by Texas to overturn the votes certified by 4 states:Pleased with the SCOTUS ruling, but also immediately slightly terrified of where this crazy train goes next.  We should know by now there’s a bottomless supply of crazy.

        ~ Brendan Buck, former adviser to Speakers of the House Paul Ryan and John Boehner