Topics

Clock

Ian Westerland
 

Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland

Curtis Delzer
 

what "clock," or is that a special app add-on for nvda?
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA

Adriani Botez
 

It is an addon. Check it on addons.nvda-project.org


Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 08.02.2019 um 06:33 schrieb Curtis Delzer <curtis@...>:

what "clock," or is that a special app add-on for nvda?
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA



Ian Westerland
 

Yes, it's an add on in NVDA.

On 2/8/2019 4:33 PM, Curtis Delzer wrote:
what "clock," or is that a special app add-on for nvda?
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA

Ron Canazzi
 

What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?

On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59.  Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland


--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

Ian Westerland
 

Hello Ron. Yes, it says 24:01 then goes to 1:0 at the top of the next hour.

On 2/8/2019 4:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?
On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59.  Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland



Ron Canazzi
 

I would bet that the program was created by folks from the US who apparently aren't acquainted with proper European UTC protocol.  I think I will e-mail the authors directly and let them know about this obvious glitch.  If enough folks do, maybe they'll make a change in the next release.  Hey, maybe they're on the list monitoring right now.

On 2/8/2019 1:00 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:

Hello Ron.  Yes, it says 24:01 then goes to 1:0 at the top of the next hour.




On 2/8/2019 4:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59.  Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland




--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

Ian Westerland
 

Hi Ron. Authors monitor this list constantly. The 24:0 announcement caught me off guard as I am a regular 24 hour clock user and more often than not, in UTC. I'll adapt but thought the question was worth asking, more for curiosity than anything else.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland

On 2/8/2019 5:07 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
I would bet that the program was created by folks from the US who apparently aren't acquainted with proper European UTC protocol.  I think I will e-mail the authors directly and let them know about this obvious glitch.  If enough folks do, maybe they'll make a change in the next release.  Hey, maybe they're on the list monitoring right now.
On 2/8/2019 1:00 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:

Hello Ron.  Yes, it says 24:01 then goes to 1:0 at the top of the next hour.




On 2/8/2019 4:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59.  Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland





 

No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.

On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59.  Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland



Ron Canazzi
 

This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.

On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59.  Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland




--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

_abdel_ <abdelkrim.bensaid@...>
 

Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.

Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland





_abdel_ <abdelkrim.bensaid@...>
 

Hi Yan, Ron and all,

Please, try this update:

http://cyber25.free.fr/nvda-addons/clock-19.02.nvda-addon

What time format did you choose in the list of available time formats?

Thanks.

Regards,
Abdel.

Le 08/02/2019 à 17:08, _abdel_ via Groups.Io a écrit :
Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.


Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland







Ian Westerland
 

Hi Abdel. It is a really good add on. It is set to chime on the hour and the chime certainly gets my attention.

Thanks again for the Clock.

Best regards


Ian Westerland

On 2/9/2019 3:08 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi,
I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.
I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.
Thanks for reporting this.
Regards,
Abdel.
Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland





Ron Canazzi
 

Thank you for your prompt response Mr. Adbel.

On 2/8/2019 11:08 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.


Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland







--
They Ask Me If I'm Happy; I say Yes.
They ask: "How Happy are You?"
I Say: "I'm as happy as a stow away chimpanzee on a banana boat!"

_abdel_ <abdelkrim.bensaid@...>
 

Hi Yan, Ron and all,

Thanks.

I'm waiting for your return regarding the midnight format.

Cheers,
Abdel.

Le 08/02/2019 à 23:10, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
Thank you for your prompt response Mr. Adbel.


On 2/8/2019 11:08 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.


Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland








Ian Westerland
 

Hello Abdel. Sorry for the delayin this reply.
The 24 hour format is now working as the standard 24 hour clock.

Thank you. All is well.

Best regards


Ian Westerland

On 2/9/2019 9:20 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi Yan, Ron and all,
Thanks.
I'm waiting for your return regarding the midnight format.
Cheers,
Abdel.
Le 08/02/2019 à 23:10, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
Thank you for your prompt response Mr. Adbel.


On 2/8/2019 11:08 AM, _abdel_ wrote:
Hi,

I'm Abdel,  one of the contributors to this add-on.

I'll perform an update and will keep you informed for testing.

Thanks for reporting this.

Regards,
Abdel.


Le 08/02/2019 à 16:49, Ron Canazzi a écrit :
This is what happens when you don't read the whole thread. I know all this stuff about the nature and configuration of the military/amateur radio clock time VS local and civilian time.  I was asking the guy who said that the Clock Add on for NVDA what happened when the clock reached 1 minute after 0 hours.


If you had read his original message, you would have seen that this add on was wrongfully saying 2400 hours when the clock reached 0 hours or 12 AM local time.  I asked him what it did after it had reached that point and he answered me that indeed it kept wrongfully identifying 0 hours as 24 hours as in: 2401, 2402, 2403 and so on.



On 2/8/2019 2:11 AM, Shaun Everiss wrote:
No, 24 hour clocks start from 00.

Then its 001 right through to 059.

Then its 100-11200.

000 to 1200 is the same as  am where the 12 hour clock is applied without the extra 0s.

After that its 1300 right to 2359.

24 hour is a military type timescale and can handle just about any timezone.

Where its not critical for normal people in general 12 hours is enough and you start from 1 again, but all clocks are 24 hours they just convert to 12.

The first analog clocks were only 12 hours, I don't know much more than that.

But I know a couple of audio and ham opps that have and continue to enjoy all the time codes and sequences both military and otherwise and have even wrote simulators and have experienced and have demos of the actual military clocks and those first ones were quite large.

The time servers you sync your time to are most likely 24hour.

The reason we civilians use 12 hours is its just easier to handle, but 24 hours is the correct timescale so its worth knowing both or at least the existance of both.

In general unless you are in military, radio, or need to do international business where you need to meet at a certain time you won't need to worry about it generally especially if you do it locally.

If you need to tell someone in a different zone, then you need to refference at some point a universal timezone which is always something like gmt I think could be slightly different, I only know its a us zone and its always 24 hours.

At any rate, even if you never ever have to refference it yourself you may get a refference and have to convert it back for your own zone.

That is basicaly the end of what I have managed to gleen from those I know, as I said earlier I know people that have actually seen the old military clocks and have even toured their instalations and are crazy on that sort of thing.

Its a bit to complex for me to be honest but for the enginiering types  about its used a lot especially if their is interest about.

If you are a ham radio op and there may be a few on here, then you probably know all this and probably know where I am buggering it up to, I can't pretend I know enough of it to fully understand it.

For most of us all you need to be able to do is convert between 12 and 24 hours if you get a time or need to convert a time period.

For that all you need to know is that 24 hours is 23 hours 59 minutes and 59 seconds long.

12 hours starts at 12 and ends at 12.

Thats the only difference you need to know about.

For the rest, its not important to know all 30+ timezones.

What will probably happen these days at any rate is if you do whatever you need to do you would have your computer or phone or both set with clocks of where you would do business or whatever and it would handle things for you.

www.thinkman.com has dimention4, that should handle syncing, its old and hasn't been updated in ages, but then it doesn't need to be, as long as we have time servers its fine.

To be honest, the databases don't change that much, the time clocks are located in military bases or universities.

There may be multiple sources.

I have 4 major clocks in my country.

nntp is the main time extention its acurate and quite fast its relyable.

You may also see standard web http servers and may see a few of those.

Now, for whatever reason to set a timeserver on the web is dead easy and doesn't seem to cost, but using the dedicated time extention nntp does cost so only the big military and universities use it or even both.

nntp like pop3 is ancient, there is a lot of stuff via the web now.

NNtp is also costly to run, again you can do all your own research, you can start at www.worldclock.com, but its important because you will need to select the fastest location in dimention4 or other synced system client.

As a general rule dimention4 will start in a military base in a central region of the us but you should select the closest location so know your citties and pick the closest place to get speed.



On 8/02/2019 6:58 PM, Ron Canazzi wrote:
What happens when it reaches the first minute of the new day? Does it say 0 hours 1 minute or does it say 24 hours and 1 minute?


On 2/8/2019 12:04 AM, Ian Westerland wrote:
Hi! I have set up the clock in NVDA and am wondering why the clock goes to 24:0 after 23:59. Usually a 24 hour clock goes back to zero after 23:59.

Cheers.


Ian Westerland








 

hi 
next version of nvda date ???...
please respond 

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 10:33 AM Curtis Delzer <curtis@...> wrote:
what "clock," or is that a special app add-on for nvda?
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA




 

thanks 

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 8:18 PM ( NAJAF . Naqvi ) via Groups.Io <najafnaqvi471=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
hi 
next version of nvda date ???...
please respond 

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 10:33 AM Curtis Delzer <curtis@...> wrote:
what "clock," or is that a special app add-on for nvda?
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA




_abdel_ <abdelkrim.bensaid@...>
 

Hi NAJAF,

I don't understand your question.

The Clock add-on is compatible with NVDA from version 2014.3 up to the current alpha 16743.

It's even compatible with Python 3.

I invite you to read the last answer I sent to Yan and Ron.

As Yan confirmed that his problem is solved, I think this topic can be closed.

Thanks.

Cheers,
Abdel.


Le 10/02/2019 à 16:19, ( NAJAF . Naqvi ) a écrit :
thanks 

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 8:18 PM ( NAJAF . Naqvi ) via Groups.Io <najafnaqvi471=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
hi 
next version of nvda date ???...
please respond 

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 10:33 AM Curtis Delzer <curtis@...> wrote:
what "clock," or is that a special app add-on for nvda?
-----
Curtis Delzer, HS.
WB6HEF
San Bernardino, CA