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Inserting a brief pause, intentionally


 

The question yesterday regarding the reading of phone numbers as digits got me thinking about how I actually do that when reading one off to a person.

I tend to cluster the digit strings for area code, exchange, and then the last four.  So I'd say something like 8 1 4 {pause}  5 3 6 {pause} 2 2 5 0.  But I have no idea if there is actually a way to indicate a brief pause in a replacement string when you pass it to the synthesizer.

Can this be done and, if so, how? 

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Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

It’s hard waking up and realizing it’s not always black and white.

     ~ Kelley Boorn

 


Hope Williamson
 

The dash indicates a pause, the synth should automatically do it. At
least mine does. It's just a brief pause, like a split second.


Giles Turnbull
 

I suspect it is synth-specific as to how much pause you get. I asked about something similar a couple of years ago (though can't find the question now) because I sometimes use NVDA to read poems that I have written but haven't memorised.

The only lengths of pause I can get with the two synth voices I use - SAPI5 Zira and Sapi5 Hazel - are the pause for a comma and the pause for a full stop / period. A semicolon seems to pause for the same length as a comma, and a dash doesn't pause at all.

I was hoping to find a way to combine pauses, such as a full stop followed by a comma to pause for a full stop and a half, or two full stops being double the length of one full stop ... but that just doesn't work!

when I did an audiobook of my first poetry pamphlet I went into a recording studio and recorded half of the poems read by me from memory, and the other half using SAPI5 Hazel. The benefit of doing that was, for the few times I wanted a bit extra pause, I could edit the mp3 file to insert an extra quarter or half second of pause. That sadly doesn't allow adjusting the pauses for real-time NVDA use.

I encountered a similar problem with a pair of Orcam glasses I used to own. They also pause for commas and pause longer for full stops, but that's as far as it goes.

Giles


 

Giles,

          Your experience meshes with what I remember when playing with this a long while back.  Although screen readers definitely generate speech, they are not dedicated speech generating devices, and thus don't generally have capabilities for "the dramatic pause" built in. Admittedly, the need is relatively rare, but it would be nice if this could be done with ease.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 2004, Build 19041  

It’s hard waking up and realizing it’s not always black and white.

     ~ Kelley Boorn