Is any one had the following browser problem with nvda?


hurrikennyandopo ...
 

hi guys


I had a person contact me about the following problem below.


I gave them a few suggestions to sus out first. One making sure there version of nvda is up to date and they do not have any add ons. They are using the chrome browser as well.


I got them to check also the time on the computer to see if it is still keeping time etc just in case it was causing problems with the time stamp with the browser and throwing up this problem.


Has any one else had this problem below? I have also got them to change there level to debug under general but it seems it only happens with a update of "Windows.


If you did have this problem how did you fix it?


Both my friend and I are visually impaired, so we still use a mouse with NVDA, my system is working very well but what is happening with my friend Karen’s on her laptop is every time Microsoft do a major upgrade her NVDA stops working.
when she tries loading a page off Google Chrome NVDA responds by saying Chrome legacy error and when she puts the mouse pointer over text it says null and will not read it.
The only way to fix this problem has been to totally remove NVDA and reinstall it and this works successfully each time
Her laptop is an Acer aspire, approximately 6 years old  end running windows 10 and Google Chrome browser.
I have tried changing the default browser to Edge but with the same results.


Gene nz


 

In an elevated command prompt . . .
Try running an:  SFC /scannow
then follow that with a:  DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

Then see what happens afterward.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Gene
 

I don't know if there is a solution. However, you can avoid starting with default settings if you remove and reinstall NVDA. Make a portable copy from the installed NVDA before updating Windows. Then, after the update, uninstall NVDA, run the portable version, and install NVDA using the install option in the portable version.

If you need more information about the create portable and install options, ask. They are in the Tools menu. When you run either option, tab through the first screen and check the checkbox for copying the current configuration, or whatever is the applicable wording for what you are doing.

Gene

-----Original Message-----
From: hurrikennyandopo ...
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 7:10 PM
To: nvda@groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Is any one had the following browser problem with nvda?

hi guys


I had a person contact me about the following problem below.


I gave them a few suggestions to sus out first. One making sure there
version of nvda is up to date and they do not have any add ons. They are
using the chrome browser as well.


I got them to check also the time on the computer to see if it is still
keeping time etc just in case it was causing problems with the time
stamp with the browser and throwing up this problem.


Has any one else had this problem below? I have also got them to change
there level to debug under general but it seems it only happens with a
update of "Windows.


If you did have this problem how did you fix it?


Both my friend and I are visually impaired, so we still use a mouse with
NVDA, my system is working very well but what is happening with my
friend Karen’s on her laptop is every time Microsoft do a major upgrade
her NVDA stops working.
when she tries loading a page off Google Chrome NVDA responds by saying
Chrome legacy error and when she puts the mouse pointer over text it
says null and will not read it.
The only way to fix this problem has been to totally remove NVDA and
reinstall it and this works successfully each time
Her laptop is an Acer aspire, approximately 6 years old end running
windows 10 and Google Chrome browser.
I have tried changing the default browser to Edge but with the same
results.


Gene nz


Luke Davis
 

Have you tried the COM Registration Fixing tool, followed by a reboot, instead of reinstalling NVDA?


--
Luke

"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw


hurrikennyandopo ...
 

Hi Luke


yes that was one of the things I got him to do as well. It should not be clobbering nvda when there is a windows update so what was mentioned happened. he also said he knows of other people using chrome and nvda but no problems when it updates windows they do not have to re install nvda.


Thanks Brian I will pass on that suggestion to him as well and also thanks to the other gene for the idea but it should not have to be done hopefully but may be on the cards.


I have never come across that type of problem and have been using nvda for years and not heard of others either having this problem.


Gene nz

On 23/04/2021 1:29 pm, Luke Davis wrote:
Have you tried the COM Registration Fixing tool, followed by a reboot, instead of reinstalling NVDA?


Gary Metzler
 

Hi Brian,

 

What is an elevated command prompt?  Thanks,

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 8:18 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is any one had the following browser problem with nvda?

 

In an elevated command prompt . . .
Try running an:  SFC /scannow
then follow that with a:  DISM /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

Then see what happens afterward.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


 

On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 01:44 PM, Gary Metzler wrote:
What is an elevated command prompt?
-
It is an instance of Command Prompt being run with administrative privileges.  This is a frequently used term, which is why I use it, and yours is a frequent question from those encountering it for the first time.  But when you see it elsewhere, whether in reference to Command Prompt or PowerShell, it means you've opened it with "Run as Admin" selected.  The window frame for the session itself should have "Administrator: " in the title before either Command Prompt or PowerShell, depending on which you're using.

Remember, that even if you are using an account with administrative privileges, neither Command Prompt or Power Shell will open with those active unless you specifically invoke them with Admin privilege.

If you hit WinKey+X, then down arrow or up arrow to the entry for Command Prompt or PowerShell, there will be two entries, one with "(Admin)" next to the name and that's the one that opens an elevated session.  The one where it's not present gives you more typical user privileges, not full admin privileges, for that session.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Jackie
 

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.

On 4/23/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 01:44 PM, Gary Metzler wrote:


What is an elevated command prompt?
-
It is an instance of Command Prompt being run with administrative
privileges.  This is a frequently used term, which is why I use it, and
yours is a frequent question from those encountering it for the first time.
But when you see it elsewhere, whether in reference to Command Prompt or
PowerShell, it means you've opened it with "Run as Admin" selected.  The
window frame for the session itself should have "Administrator: " in the
title before either Command Prompt or PowerShell, depending on which you're
using.

Remember, that even if you are using an account with administrative
privileges, neither Command Prompt or Power Shell will open with those
active unless you specifically invoke them with Admin privilege.

If you hit WinKey+X, then down arrow or up arrow to the entry for Command
Prompt or PowerShell, there will be two entries, one with "(Admin)" next to
the name and that's the one that opens an elevated session.  The one where
it's not present gives you more typical user privileges, not full admin
privileges, for that session.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless
you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

~ Richard M. Nixon





--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
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Luke Davis
 

Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.


Sarah k Alawami
 

I thought it was control shift enter on a program to run as admin, unless I misread instructions, which very well could have happened.

--

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our website.

to subscribe to the feed click here and you can also follow us on twitter

Our discord is where you will know when we go live on twitch. Feel free to give the channel a follow and see what is up there.

For stream archives, products you can buy and more visit my main lbry page and my tffp lbry page You will also be able to buy some of my products and eBooks there.
Finally, you can support my work on happs, the network of now.

On 23 Apr 2021, at 11:51, Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.

On 4/23/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 01:44 PM, Gary Metzler wrote:

What is an elevated command prompt?

-
It is an instance of Command Prompt being run with administrative
privileges.  This is a frequently used term, which is why I use it, and
yours is a frequent question from those encountering it for the first time.
But when you see it elsewhere, whether in reference to Command Prompt or
PowerShell, it means you've opened it with "Run as Admin" selected.  The
window frame for the session itself should have "Administrator: " in the
title before either Command Prompt or PowerShell, depending on which you're
using.

Remember, that even if you are using an account with administrative
privileges, neither Command Prompt or Power Shell will open with those
active unless you specifically invoke them with Admin privilege.

If you hit WinKey+X, then down arrow or up arrow to the entry for Command
Prompt or PowerShell, there will be two entries, one with "(Admin)" next to
the name and that's the one that opens an elevated session.  The one where
it's not present gives you more typical user privileges, not full admin
privileges, for that session.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless
you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

~ Richard M. Nixon





--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message to:
wp4newbs-request@... with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by
visiting the list page at http://www.freelists.org/list/wp4newbs
& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com



Jackie
 

Actually, Sarah, I think that's right, & I apologize for omitting the
shift part.

On 4/23/21, Sarah k Alawami <marrie12@gmail.com> wrote:
I thought it was control shift enter on a program to run as admin,
unless I misread instructions, which very well could have happened.

--

Sarah Alawami, owner of TFFP. . For more info go to our
[website.](http://www.tffppodcast.com)

to subscribe to the feed click [here](http://feeds.feedburner.com/tffp)
and you can also [follow us on twitter](http://twitter.com/tffppodcast)

Our [discord](http://tiny.cc/d-tffp) is where you will know when we go
live on [twitch.](http://twitch.tv/ke7zum) Feel free to give the channel
a follow and see what is up there.

For stream archives, products you can buy and more visit [my main lbry
page](http://lbry.tv/@ke7zum) and my [tffp lbry
page](http://lbry.tv/@tffp) You will also be able to buy some of my
products and eBooks there.
Finally, you can support my work on [happs, the network of
now.](http://happs.tv/@ke7zum)

On 23 Apr 2021, at 11:51, Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.

On 4/23/21, Brian Vogel <britechguy@gmail.com> wrote:
On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 01:44 PM, Gary Metzler wrote:


What is an elevated command prompt?
-
It is an instance of Command Prompt being run with administrative
privileges.  This is a frequently used term, which is why I use it,
and
yours is a frequent question from those encountering it for the first
time.
But when you see it elsewhere, whether in reference to Command Prompt
or
PowerShell, it means you've opened it with "Run as Admin" selected.
The
window frame for the session itself should have "Administrator: " in
the
title before either Command Prompt or PowerShell, depending on which
you're
using.

Remember, that even if you are using an account with administrative
privileges, neither Command Prompt or Power Shell will open with
those
active unless you specifically invoke them with Admin privilege.

If you hit WinKey+X, then down arrow or up arrow to the entry for
Command
Prompt or PowerShell, there will be two entries, one with "(Admin)"
next to
the name and that's the one that opens an elevated session.  The one
where
it's not present gives you more typical user privileges, not full
admin
privileges, for that session.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win
unless
you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

~ Richard M. Nixon






--
Subscribe to a WordPress for Newbies Mailing List by sending a message
to:
wp4newbs-request@freelists.org with 'subscribe' in the Subject field
OR by
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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com &
www.mysitesbeenhacked.com






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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Luke Davis
 

You're right, Sarah. I must have been misremembering that one.

Sarah k Alawami wrote:

I thought it was control shift enter on a program to run as admin, unless I misread instructions, which very well could have happened.


Gary Metzler
 

Hi Brian,

 

Thanks for the instructions they are very helpful.  You’re the best.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 2:04 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Is any one had the following browser problem with nvda?

 

On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 01:44 PM, Gary Metzler wrote:

What is an elevated command prompt?

-
It is an instance of Command Prompt being run with administrative privileges.  This is a frequently used term, which is why I use it, and yours is a frequent question from those encountering it for the first time.  But when you see it elsewhere, whether in reference to Command Prompt or PowerShell, it means you've opened it with "Run as Admin" selected.  The window frame for the session itself should have "Administrator: " in the title before either Command Prompt or PowerShell, depending on which you're using.

Remember, that even if you are using an account with administrative privileges, neither Command Prompt or Power Shell will open with those active unless you specifically invoke them with Admin privilege.

If you hit WinKey+X, then down arrow or up arrow to the entry for Command Prompt or PowerShell, there will be two entries, one with "(Admin)" next to the name and that's the one that opens an elevated session.  The one where it's not present gives you more typical user privileges, not full admin privileges, for that session.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Pro, 64-Bit, Version 20H2, Build 19042  

Always remember others may hate you but those who hate you don't win unless you hate them.  And then you destroy yourself.

       ~ Richard M. Nixon

 


Richard Wells
 

I Have to press SHIFT+CONTROL+ENTER to get the elevated prompt from the
run dialog.

On 4/23/2021 3:09 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it
in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.



Chris Smart
 

Hmm, the prompt is not looking any different no matter what I add to Enter. what am I missing?

How can I tell I've launched the elevated prompt?

On 2021-04-23 7:58 p.m., Richard Wells wrote:
I Have to press SHIFT+CONTROL+ENTER to get the elevated prompt from the
run dialog.

On 4/23/2021 3:09 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it
in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.






Jackie
 

Chris, invoke the run dialog. Type cmd then hit control shift enter.
You'll get a UAC popup, to which you'll need to answer yes (alt y) to
get the elevated command prompt. Once that's done, if you press insert
t, you'll hear something similar, if not identical to, "administrator
c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe."

On 4/23/21, Chris Smart <ve3rwj@winsystem.org> wrote:
Hmm, the prompt is not looking any different no matter what I add to
Enter. what am I missing?

How can I tell I've launched the elevated prompt?


On 2021-04-23 7:58 p.m., Richard Wells wrote:
I Have to press SHIFT+CONTROL+ENTER to get the elevated prompt from the
run dialog.

On 4/23/2021 3:09 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it
in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.










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& check out my sites at www.brightstarsweb.com & www.mysitesbeenhacked.com


Chris Smart
 

ah ok. got it. I already have UAC turned to minimum so didn't see the dialog.

On 2021-04-24 1:04 a.m., Jackie wrote:
Chris, invoke the run dialog. Type cmd then hit control shift enter.
You'll get a UAC popup, to which you'll need to answer yes (alt y) to
get the elevated command prompt. Once that's done, if you press insert
t, you'll hear something similar, if not identical to, "administrator
c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe."

On 4/23/21, Chris Smart <ve3rwj@winsystem.org> wrote:
Hmm, the prompt is not looking any different no matter what I add to
Enter. what am I missing?

How can I tell I've launched the elevated prompt?


On 2021-04-23 7:58 p.m., Richard Wells wrote:
I Have to press SHIFT+CONTROL+ENTER to get the elevated prompt from the
run dialog.

On 4/23/2021 3:09 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it
in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.








Chris Smart
 

cmd

On 2021-04-24 1:04 a.m., Jackie wrote:
Chris, invoke the run dialog. Type cmd then hit control shift enter.
You'll get a UAC popup, to which you'll need to answer yes (alt y) to
get the elevated command prompt. Once that's done, if you press insert
t, you'll hear something similar, if not identical to, "administrator
c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe."

On 4/23/21, Chris Smart <ve3rwj@winsystem.org> wrote:
Hmm, the prompt is not looking any different no matter what I add to
Enter. what am I missing?

How can I tell I've launched the elevated prompt?


On 2021-04-23 7:58 p.m., Richard Wells wrote:
I Have to press SHIFT+CONTROL+ENTER to get the elevated prompt from the
run dialog.

On 4/23/2021 3:09 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it
in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.








Luke Davis
 

A regular user command prompt will launch in your home directory.

C:\Users\YourUserName>

The elevated prompt will launch in something like:

C:\Windows\System32>

Just press enter after the prompt launches, and you'll hear what directory you're in as part of the prompt.

Also, an elevated one should hit you with a UAC dialog before it starts.

Luke

Chris Smart wrote:

Hmm, the prompt is not looking any different no matter what I add to Enter. what am I missing?


Greg Epley <greg.epley64@...>
 

Far less keystrokes and not having to remember whether one needs Ctrl and/or Shift with Enter is WindowsKey+X to pop open the Start menu, followed by "A" as in "Admin", then Alt+Y to respond Yes to the UAC prompt. The resulting window title says "Administrator:" to indicate you're in an elevated command window. This will work unless one has perhaps configured their Start menu to show more items than I prefer; I deliberately keep mine as bare bones as possible since I prefer other shortcut methods to launch items. I use the same Start menu shortcut key and single letters to perform restarts, shutdowns or other common operations with less keystrokes. The specific letters one needs should be spoken by most screen readers unless the screen reader has been set not to report such aids, which would only be advisable for very advanced Windows users.

-Greg Epley

On 4/24/2021 12:58 AM, Chris Smart wrote:
Hmm, the prompt is not looking any different no matter what I add to Enter. what am I missing?

How can I tell I've launched the elevated prompt?


On 2021-04-23 7:58 p.m., Richard Wells wrote:
I Have to press SHIFT+CONTROL+ENTER to get the elevated prompt from the
run dialog.

On 4/23/2021 3:09 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Jackie, at least in 20H2, that no longer seems to work. I noticed it
in passing last week, and just checked again per your comment.

Jackie wrote:

Might I also say that if you invoke the run dialog (windows key + r)
then type cmd & press *control+enter* as opposed to just enter alone,
you'll also get an administrative (elevated) command prompt.