Topics

Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging. What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, web browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I'm trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?


Thanks,


Noah

Gene
 

You don't need a powerful machine such as a gaming or a power user machine.  The problem isn't that you need a powerful machine, it may be that the machines you are using are significantly underpowered.  As a very rough estimate, I haven't priced computers for years, I would say that an approximately 500 dollar laptop should do what you want.  What synthesizer do you use with NVDA?  That may or may not make a difference and it may or may not mean that your school computers can do what you want.  But depending on the answer, you may want to test your school machines with another synthesizer before deciding if you have to buy one.
 
Also, what lags?  From what I've read, Word is often slow with NVDA.  Have you tried the lagging programs by themselves to make sure they don't lag when used on their own? 
 
Gene

Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 5:53 PM
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, web
browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I'm trying to do work. Do
you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
you might recommend?


Thanks,


Noah



 

Gene is correct.  NVDA is not a processing intensive application as that term is conventionally used.

I have a mid-level laptop (AMD A12-9700 APU and 12GB RAM) that has no problem with NVDA running on top of Firefox and Chrome running at once with many tabs open on each as well as having other programs such as MS-Word, PDF X-Change Viewer, Notepad, etc., up at the same time.

I'm using the OneCore voices and it was the same when I used SAPI-5 voices.
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

 

Hi,

Besides what Gene is saying, do you happen to know the specs for the school machines, which NVDA version you’re trying to use on them, and which Windows release they’re using?

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 4:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

You don't need a powerful machine such as a gaming or a power user machine.  The problem isn't that you need a powerful machine, it may be that the machines you are using are significantly underpowered.  As a very rough estimate, I haven't priced computers for years, I would say that an approximately 500 dollar laptop should do what you want.  What synthesizer do you use with NVDA?  That may or may not make a difference and it may or may not mean that your school computers can do what you want.  But depending on the answer, you may want to test your school machines with another synthesizer before deciding if you have to buy one.

 

Also, what lags?  From what I've read, Word is often slow with NVDA.  Have you tried the lagging programs by themselves to make sure they don't lag when used on their own? 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 5:53 PM

Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, web
browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I'm trying to do work. Do
you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
you might recommend?


Thanks,


Noah


 

No, but I can get that info. I know that with Chrome and Word open, the CPU was at about 85%. I have no idea about the particular CPU. The ram was 4 GB, and that was constantly at 2 to 3 GB with word and Chrome.

They were tablet laptops--ridiculously under powered, too. Even the sited kids said they were a pain, actually. I've been forced to use my personal laptop, which is against school policy.

On 1/10/2019 19:23, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi,

Besides what Gene is saying, do you happen to know the specs for the school machines, which NVDA version you’re trying to use on them, and which Windows release they’re using?

Cheers,

Joseph

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 4:16 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

You don't need a powerful machine such as a gaming or a power user machine.  The problem isn't that you need a powerful machine, it may be that the machines you are using are significantly underpowered.  As a very rough estimate, I haven't priced computers for years, I would say that an approximately 500 dollar laptop should do what you want.  What synthesizer do you use with NVDA?  That may or may not make a difference and it may or may not mean that your school computers can do what you want.  But depending on the answer, you may want to test your school machines with another synthesizer before deciding if you have to buy one.

 

Also, what lags?  From what I've read, Word is often slow with NVDA.  Have you tried the lagging programs by themselves to make sure they don't lag when used on their own? 

 

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Thursday, January 10, 2019 5:53 PM

Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

 

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, web
browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I'm trying to do work. Do
you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
you might recommend?


Thanks,


Noah


 

With Chrome open, particularly if there are multiple tabs, but even if not, along with Word on a machine with 4GB RAM, even under Windows 7, one can expect "less than sprightly" performance.

4GB is the bare, bare minimum with even just a couple of modern programs running, which expect there to be more RAM breathing room than 4GB provides.

--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs. They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
You might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah

Antony Stone
 

I disagree with "needs to have an SSD". It's nice, but it's not essential.
It improves startup time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for
applications, but doesn't affect how well applications run once they're loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit". I'd say that is the
most important aspect of getting a machine to run well. Also, it's essential
that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the
machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is
fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more
so than a particularly fast CPU.

So my list of priorities would be:

1. 64 bit CPU and 64 bit edition of Windows
2. Lots of RAM
3. Multi-core CPU
4. Fast CPU
5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:
Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance
CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An
Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you
do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many
programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah
Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
You might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah
--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
- momentarily
- suspenders
- chips
- pants
- jelly
- pavement
- vest
- pint (and gallon)
- pissed


Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah

Darren Harris
 

I don't think you need an ssd drive. It's not essential. Up until last year I was using a mechanical drive for years. It's the ram that makes the difference. Ram and CPU speed and to some extent the graphics card. I say that as the graphics cards all have ram on them as well these days so you can effectively borrow ram from the card if necessary. Ssd drives as has been said do help with loading times definitely but once the programme/application is active it all comes down to ram and CPU.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian K. Lingard
Sent: 11 January 2019 11:19
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah

Gene
 

As much RAM as you can afford?  There is a mistique about RAM and this illogical statement is part of it, which I see often.  You don't need 12gb, 16gb, 32gb of RAM to use the kinds of programs specified in the message.  For people who use the kinds of programs discussed in the original message, and that's the majority of users who don't use memory intensive programs, the typical standard practice of manufacturers today of including 8gb of RAM is sufficient or more than sufficient. 
 
What's the point of getting 16gb of RAM if you won't use more than 4 or 6GB?
 
I also strongly disagree with the SSD specifdication for the uses of the computer specified in the original question.  The person who asked didn't say he would be doing any of the things specified.  I'm not saying not to get a machine with an SSD, Others who know more about what is being sold today can discuss choices further.  I'm not saying not to get a machine with an SSD, I'm saying that if it means spending significantly more for getting a machine that is equivalent in other ways, then the question of whether it is worth getting the SSD is worth the extra money has to be considered.  I never worked with an SSD machine but I doubt that it matters significantly for the programs being specified.  Once they load, they run in RAM.  Documents would load faster in Word, I would think but but that's not what takes time when you use Word.  It's actually writing or editing the document.  Word, for example, wold load faster but aggain, after it is loaded the real time you spend with the program is working with it editing and writing and doing other things where you work with the document 
 
Gene

Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:00 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

I disagree with "needs to have an SSD".  It's nice, but it's not essential. 
It improves startup time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for
applications, but doesn't affect how well applications run once they're loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit".  I'd say that is the
most important aspect of getting a machine to run well.  Also, it's essential
that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the
machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is
fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more
so than a particularly fast CPU.

So my list of priorities would be:

1. 64 bit CPU and 64 bit edition of Windows
2. Lots of RAM
3. Multi-core CPU
4. Fast CPU
5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:

> Dear Noah & List:
>
> Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
> 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
> The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
> Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance
> CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An
> Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you
> do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many
> programs concurrently.
>
> School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
> They are also several years old
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah
> Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
> To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
> Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications
>
> Hi All,
>
>
> I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
> Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
> What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
> Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
> You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
> You might recommend.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
> Noah

--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
 - momentarily
 - suspenders
 - chips
 - pants
 - jelly
 - pavement
 - vest
 - pint (and gallon)
 - pissed


                                                   Please reply to the list;
                                                         please *don't* CC me.


Gene
 

That is a general statement and is not correct if you run a synthesizer that is not computer intensive.  I don't know how much more work it is to run an intensive synthesizer but because of slower response time while working with one, many blind people run a very responsive synthesizer such as Eloquence for actual working with the computer.  They use one of the newer more intensive synthesizers for listening to things where they will be just listening such as reading a book. 
 
A screen-reader when used with a synthesizer like Eloquence is not intensive.  I don't know whether an SSD increases responsiveness of the newer kind of synthesizer but my point is that you needn't buy a much more expensive machine to use a screen-reader as I've described.  If you do, and if you benefit from doing so when you use a more intensive synthesizer for everything, you then have to consider the extra money you spent on the computer as part of the cost of the synthesizer and it may be unreasonable.  I'm also not saying that getting a really fast computer would make newer synthesizers more responsive, I don't know.  I'm talking about cost/benefit.
 
Gene

Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:19 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah




Tyler Wood
 

Hi,

Intel Pentium processors can run all of that just fine paired with 8 gb of ram. An i3 can run it, too. This falsehood that an i5 or i7 processor is always the answer really needs to stop.


A solid state drive, however, does make an enormous difference so investing in a machine with one, especially if you'll be keeping it long term, really is a great idea.


On 1/11/2019 9:05 AM, Gene wrote:
That is a general statement and is not correct if you run a synthesizer that is not computer intensive.  I don't know how much more work it is to run an intensive synthesizer but because of slower response time while working with one, many blind people run a very responsive synthesizer such as Eloquence for actual working with the computer.  They use one of the newer more intensive synthesizers for listening to things where they will be just listening such as reading a book. 
 
A screen-reader when used with a synthesizer like Eloquence is not intensive.  I don't know whether an SSD increases responsiveness of the newer kind of synthesizer but my point is that you needn't buy a much more expensive machine to use a screen-reader as I've described.  If you do, and if you benefit from doing so when you use a more intensive synthesizer for everything, you then have to consider the extra money you spent on the computer as part of the cost of the synthesizer and it may be unreasonable.  I'm also not saying that getting a really fast computer would make newer synthesizers more responsive, I don't know.  I'm talking about cost/benefit.
 
Gene
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:19 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah




Monte Single
 

You cannot install the belarc advisor on a machine that is part of a network if you do not have administrative rights. I know, I tried.

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf Of Brian K. Lingard
Sent: January-11-19 5:19 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Dear Noah & List:

Running a screenreader adds a fair bit of work to a PC as you have a software synthesizer. You could offload the work of speaking by using a hardware synthesizer such as a Doubletalk or Triple talk. Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM. 32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording. The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU. Giving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I5 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.
Web browsing is light work for a PC.
Download the Belarc Advisor from HTTPS://www.belarc.com. Run it on the problem computers at school. Lists the CPU chip, installed RAM, software licenses, everything worth knowing about the PC. Also gives information on the SSD or Hard Disk. Program is free for personal use.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah Carver via Groups.Io
Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,
I will need to get a laptop for school; however, the school machines cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that you might recommend?

Thanks,

Noah

 

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 06:27 AM, Darren Harris wrote:
Ssd drives as has been said do help with loading times definitely but once the programme/application is active it all comes down to ram and CPU.
Absolutely, positively incorrect in practice.   Active programs are constantly doing disc I/O of various sorts, and more importantly, so is the operating system.  The gains in speed from an SSD versus an HDD are incredibly significant to how quick things are for the end user.

And the above is coming from someone who still has only HDDs in his computers.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

 

 

Brian K. Lingard
 

Dear Anthony & List:

Interesting. Get the most cores you can to run multiple CPU-hungry programs concurrently. If your PC is doing much swapping because you have heavy memory usage as when recalculating huge spreadsheets, SSD should speed up the PC quite a bit. However, stuffing the PC full of RAM will reduce the need to swap.
Brian K. Lingard

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Antony Stone
Sent: January 11, 2019 6:01 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

I disagree with "needs to have an SSD". It is nice, but it is not essential.
It improves start up time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for applications, but does not affect how well applications run once they are loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit". I would say that is the most important aspect of getting a machine to run well. In addition, it is essential that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more so than a particularly fast CPU.

Therefore, my list of priorities would be:

1. 64-bit CPU and 64-bit edition of Windows 2. Lots of RAM 3. Multi-core CPU 4. Fast CPU 5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:

Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
32 -GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that
High-performance CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not
Necessarily Intel I8 speed. An Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine.
You consume many CPU cycles if you do sound or video editing,
recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of
Noah Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive
Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines
cannot run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and
web Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do
Work. Do you have any recommendations for specs or any particular?
Laptops that you might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah
--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
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Unfortunately this is often the case these days. I know in the UK school budgets are hard presses and they tend to use hardware until it expires.
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Noah Carver via Groups.Io" <ntclists=aol.com@groups.io>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 1:24 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications


No, but I can get that info. I know that with Chrome and Word open, the
CPU was at about 85%. I have no idea about the particular CPU. The ram
was 4 GB, and that was constantly at 2 to 3 GB with word and Chrome.

They were tablet laptops--ridiculously under powered, too. Even the
sited kids said they were a pain, actually. I've been forced to use my
personal laptop, which is against school policy.

On 1/10/2019 19:23, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi,

Besides what Gene is saying, do you happen to know the specs for the
school machines, which NVDA version you’re trying to use on them, and
which Windows release they’re using?

Cheers,

Joseph

*From:* nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> *On Behalf Of *Gene
*Sent:* Thursday, January 10, 2019 4:16 PM
*To:* nvda@nvda.groups.io
*Subject:* Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive
Applications

You don't need a powerful machine such as a gaming or a power user
machine. The problem isn't that you need a powerful machine, it may
be that the machines you are using are significantly underpowered. As
a very rough estimate, I haven't priced computers for years, I would
say that an approximately 500 dollar laptop should do what you want.
What synthesizer do you use with NVDA? That may or may not make a
difference and it may or may not mean that your school computers can
do what you want. But depending on the answer, you may want to test
your school machines with another synthesizer before deciding if you
have to buy one.

Also, what lags? From what I've read, Word is often slow with NVDA.
Have you tried the lagging programs by themselves to make sure they
don't lag when used on their own?

Gene

----- Original Message -----

Gene

----- Original Message -----

*From:*Noah Carver via Groups.Io <mailto:ntclists=aol.com@groups.io>

*Sent:*Thursday, January 10, 2019 5:53 PM

*To:*nvda@nvda.groups.io <mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io>

*Subject:*[nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, web
browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I'm trying to do work. Do
you have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
you might recommend?


Thanks,


Noah



Brian's Mail list account
 

Yes, i find 8 gigs OK with a four core processor myself. It was in 2016 a very good machine, and it still is, but things seem to have once again gone up a notch. It has always been my view that the programmers of big bits of software have not been worrying about the efficiency of their code and we end up with problems.
I did try a newer version of word, but it is like paint trying compared to the old one.
I'm beginning to think sometimes programmers assume that only their software will be running!
Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Vogel" <@britechguy>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 3:41 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications


With Chrome open, particularly if there are multiple tabs, but even if not, along with Word on a machine with 4GB RAM, even under Windows 7, one can expect "less than sprightly" performance.

4GB is the bare, bare minimum with even just a couple of modern programs running, which expect there to be more RAM breathing room than 4GB provides.

--

Brian *-* Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763

*A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.*

~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back

Brian's Mail list account
 

One thing to watch for these days is the machine with a hard drive smaller than 250gb. I see some awful ones at companies like Argos, for example with hardly enough drive space for windows and a few applications. it often comes crammed with bloatware as well which somebody knowledgeable should remove.

Brian

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----- Original Message -----
From: "Gene" <gsasner@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 1:50 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications


As much RAM as you can afford? There is a mistique about RAM and this illogical statement is part of it, which I see often. You don't need 12gb, 16gb, 32gb of RAM to use the kinds of programs specified in the message. For people who use the kinds of programs discussed in the original message, and that's the majority of users who don't use memory intensive programs, the typical standard practice of manufacturers today of including 8gb of RAM is sufficient or more than sufficient.

What's the point of getting 16gb of RAM if you won't use more than 4 or 6GB?

I also strongly disagree with the SSD specifdication for the uses of the computer specified in the original question. The person who asked didn't say he would be doing any of the things specified. I'm not saying not to get a machine with an SSD, Others who know more about what is being sold today can discuss choices further. I'm not saying not to get a machine with an SSD, I'm saying that if it means spending significantly more for getting a machine that is equivalent in other ways, then the question of whether it is worth getting the SSD is worth the extra money has to be considered. I never worked with an SSD machine but I doubt that it matters significantly for the programs being specified. Once they load, they run in RAM. Documents would load faster in Word, I would think but but that's not what takes time when you use Word. It's actually writing or editing the document. Word, for example, wold load faster but aggain, after it is loaded the real time you spend with the program is working with it editing and writing and doing other things where you work with the document

Gene
----- Original Message -----

From: Antony Stone
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 5:00 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications


I disagree with "needs to have an SSD". It's nice, but it's not essential.
It improves startup time for the machine as a whole, and loading time for
applications, but doesn't affect how well applications run once they're loaded.

I agree with "as much RAM as you can afford / will fit". I'd say that is the
most important aspect of getting a machine to run well. Also, it's essential
that you have a 64-bit machine and a 64-bit version of Windows, otherwise the
machine simply will not use more than 3Gbytes of RAM no matter how much is
fitted.

A CPU with several cores will help with running multiple applications - more
so than a particularly fast CPU.

So my list of priorities would be:

1. 64 bit CPU and 64 bit edition of Windows
2. Lots of RAM
3. Multi-core CPU
4. Fast CPU
5. SSD instead of HDD

Hope that helps,


Antony.

On Friday 11 January 2019 at 11:52:42, Brian K. Lingard wrote:

Dear Noah & List:

Your laptop needs SSD not a mechanical hard disk with 8, 16 or 32 GB RAM.
32 GB is best if you plan to do video and/or audio editing & recording.
The PC at your school may have as little as one GB RAM and a slow CPU.
Hiving the laptop adequate RAM ids, more important that high-performance
CPU. Look for a laptop with a fast, but not necessarily Intel I8 speed. An
Intel I55 or six CPU should work fine. You consume CPU cycles a lot if you
do sound or video editing, recalculate mammoth spreadsheets and run many
programs concurrently.

School computers may have as little as one or two GB RRAM and slow CPUs.
They are also several years old

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io [mailto:nvda@nvda.groups.io] On Behalf of Noah
Carver via Groups.Io Sent: January 10, 2019 6:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] Minimum Specs for NVDA with Other Intensive Applications

Hi All,


I will need to get a laptop for school, however the school machines can
Not run NVDA plus Chrome and Word all at the same time without lagging.
What I need is a powerful machine that can handle email, office, and web
Browsing, ETC. without wimping out on me while I am trying to do work. Do
You have any recommendations for specs or any particular laptops that
You might recommend.


Thanks,


Noah
--
A few words to be cautious of between American and English:
- momentarily
- suspenders
- chips
- pants
- jelly
- pavement
- vest
- pint (and gallon)
- pissed


Please reply to the list;
please *don't* CC me.

 

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 11:15 AM, Brian's Mail list account wrote:
comes crammed with bloatware as well which somebody knowledgeable should remove.
I've pretty much come around to the view that one of the best things anyone can do to get as clean a slate they can, if a machine comes with Windows 10 installed, is [URL=https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/667627/doing-a-completely-clean-install-of-windows-10/][i]Doing a Completely Clean Install of Windows 10[/i][/URL] as the first order of business.

Windows 10, as downloaded from the Microsoft site using the Media Creation Tool, is as spic n' span a version of Windows 10 that exists and it can be used to give you a very clean starting point, devoid of bloatware of any kind.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763  

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

          ~ Saul Bellow, To Jerusalem and Back