MS Access


Yeti
 

Hello list,

who has experience with NVDA and MS Access?

For the moment I am interested in the following options:
- Creating a local database.
- Creating tables
- Creating relationships between tables
- Creating queries

I have a lot of experience with relational databases and
also with Access, but in these years I used another screen
reader and had a still usable Eyesight.

Ad Astra

yeti


Richard B. McDonald
 

See the link below. This girl has created a series of tutorials for MS
Access with NVDA that are *really* good.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jWI0YylFU8

HTH,
Richard

-----Original Message-----
From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Yeti
Sent: Saturday, October 09, 2021 2:16 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] MS Access

Hello list,

who has experience with NVDA and MS Access?

For the moment I am interested in the following options:
- Creating a local database.
- Creating tables
- Creating relationships between tables
- Creating queries

I have a lot of experience with relational databases and also with Access,
but in these years I used another screen reader and had a still usable
Eyesight.

Ad Astra

yeti


TheeQuinn Public
 

I have just the resource for you. I have tutorials on my YouTube channel in which I teach you how to use NVDA to do all those things that you listed. Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jWI0YylFU8&t=44s


Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

Hi,

 

I cannot find your name but I have listened to the initial tutorial on using Microsoft access  with NVDA and I would like to congratulate you on an excellent piece of work.

 

I used to use Access regularly but when windows developed, access became unusable with my screen reader and I turned to excel for all my database and spreadsheet work.

 

I have a new archiving project coming up soon and your message is encouraging me to look at using Access for the storage of data elements.

 

Certainly, I will follow up by making myself familiar with access  now that you have given me a real opportunity to do so!

 

 

All the best and many thanks,

 

Cearbhall

 

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of TheeQuinn Public
Sent: Saturday, October 9, 2021 5:18 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] MS Access

 

I have just the resource for you. I have tutorials on my YouTube channel in which I teach you how to use NVDA to do all those things that you listed. Check it out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jWI0YylFU8&t=44s




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I actually need to take the time to go through the tutorials TheeQuinn has put out there just for my own curiosity, but the tiny (and it was very tiny) bit that I picked up from the page and comments suggests that it focuses on the GUI for MS-Access.  And as the first, and only resource that addresses that for screen reader users, all I can say is:  Bravo!

But since I see she's "entered the fray" here, I'm curious to solicit her, and perhaps others', opinions about using MS-Access from the command line and with SQL and data files.

I'm not blind, but when I was first learning RDBMS systems that's truly the only way you accessed them.  That went by the wayside as the primary access method as GUIs developed, but in the case of a screen reader user I often think that using the command line interface with SQL and data files could be much easier, and much less error prone.

Just wondering if anyone is actually going that route, and what they have to say about it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


Gene
 

I listened to a little of it and it sounds like a well done tutorial.  I would say that in future, music shouldn’t be used beyond the opening.  I find it distracting during the actual teaching.  In particular, I find the rhythmic synthesizer effects distracting.
 
I hope this is taken in the spirit of constructive criticism.  As I said, the material itself seems to me to be well presented from the little I’ve heard.
 
Gene

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Saturday, October 09, 2021 12:25 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] MS Access
 
I actually need to take the time to go through the tutorials TheeQuinn has put out there just for my own curiosity, but the tiny (and it was very tiny) bit that I picked up from the page and comments suggests that it focuses on the GUI for MS-Access.  And as the first, and only resource that addresses that for screen reader users, all I can say is:  Bravo!

But since I see she's "entered the fray" here, I'm curious to solicit her, and perhaps others', opinions about using MS-Access from the command line and with SQL and data files.

I'm not blind, but when I was first learning RDBMS systems that's truly the only way you accessed them.  That went by the wayside as the primary access method as GUIs developed, but in the case of a screen reader user I often think that using the command line interface with SQL and data files could be much easier, and much less error prone.

Just wondering if anyone is actually going that route, and what they have to say about it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


Cearbhall O'Meadhra
 

Brian,

 

I’m interested in your reaction to that tutorial.

 

I didn’t elaborate, but my last experience of positive action with a database system was in DOS with SQL. Like you, I found SQL a very comfortable and efficient tool to resolve all my database problems. Unfortunately, the GUI interface and WYZWYG editors threw me out of the database world.

 

Now, I am very hopeful of returning to it with this new tutorial.

 

Do you know who this person is that is creating these tutorials?

 

I have seen two of them so far and am very impressed with the clarity, relation to NVDA usage and proven productivity!

 

 

All the best,

 

Cearbhall

 

m +353 (0)833323487 Ph: _353 (0)1-2864623 e: cearbhall.omeadhra@...

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, October 9, 2021 6:26 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] MS Access

 

I actually need to take the time to go through the tutorials TheeQuinn has put out there just for my own curiosity, but the tiny (and it was very tiny) bit that I picked up from the page and comments suggests that it focuses on the GUI for MS-Access.  And as the first, and only resource that addresses that for screen reader users, all I can say is:  Bravo!

But since I see she's "entered the fray" here, I'm curious to solicit her, and perhaps others', opinions about using MS-Access from the command line and with SQL and data files.

I'm not blind, but when I was first learning RDBMS systems that's truly the only way you accessed them.  That went by the wayside as the primary access method as GUIs developed, but in the case of a screen reader user I often think that using the command line interface with SQL and data files could be much easier, and much less error prone.

Just wondering if anyone is actually going that route, and what they have to say about it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 




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TheeQuinn Public
 

I am actually the person behind the tutorials. If you have any questions or comments, you can contact me here at theequinnpublic@...


Richard Bartholomew
 

Not MS Access oriented but from the more corporate DB side of things, eg Oracle, SQL Server, MySQL etc, when I was working as a production support DBA (admittedly a few years ago now!), whilst my seeing colleagues used GUIs for quickly seeing the health of DBs from the locks/space usage/general performance side of things, for 'serious' work, like me, they used the command line and raw SQL to get the job done efficiently.

 

Cheers

Richard Bartholomew

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: 09 October 2021 18:26
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] MS Access

 

I actually need to take the time to go through the tutorials TheeQuinn has put out there just for my own curiosity, but the tiny (and it was very tiny) bit that I picked up from the page and comments suggests that it focuses on the GUI for MS-Access.  And as the first, and only resource that addresses that for screen reader users, all I can say is:  Bravo!

But since I see she's "entered the fray" here, I'm curious to solicit her, and perhaps others', opinions about using MS-Access from the command line and with SQL and data files.

I'm not blind, but when I was first learning RDBMS systems that's truly the only way you accessed them.  That went by the wayside as the primary access method as GUIs developed, but in the case of a screen reader user I often think that using the command line interface with SQL and data files could be much easier, and much less error prone.

Just wondering if anyone is actually going that route, and what they have to say about it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy

 


 

Richard,

It was true for me, and my coworkers (who were sighted as I am), as well back when I was a DBA and/or doing embedded SQL coding in the 1990s.  Once in a very great while if I needed a really "quick and dirty" result I'd run an SQL query within the GUI, which has its own version of the command prompt/power shell in every RDBMS I've used in the 1990s and beyond.

It was just much easier to formulate the SQL, check it, then check the data set results you got by feeding it in via the command line and looking at the resulting output files of records.  We were particularly careful to always create SELECT statements with the same selection logic that we were going to use to delete records.  That way we could see precisely what was going to be nuked before nuking it.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H1, Build 19043  

The ignorance of one voter in a democracy impairs the security of all.

         ~ John F. Kennedy