NVDA and windows 11


JinYoun
 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 


Gene
 

I've read a little about changes and new features in Windows 11.  Some people may want this or that feature.  There is nothing I've read about that I want. 

It may work just as well but why change for no benefit and take even a small chance that some unexpected problem may result?

Gene

On 8/4/2022 11:14 AM, JinYoun wrote:
Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 


 

I did upgrade to Windows 11 months ago ago and all is well with the
latest version of NVDA.

On 8/4/22, JinYoun <healthytaeshim@...> wrote:
Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working
well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows
11?
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better
than windows 10?
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on
here.





--
Nevzat Adil
Library of Congress Certified
Literary Braille Proofreader
C: 512 502 4403
e-mail: nevzatadil@...
Facebook: m.facebook.com/LiteraryBrailleProofreader


Howard Traxler
 

Hello JinYoun,


Yes, I bought a new machine that has 11 already installed.  I'm in the process of migrating all my stuff onto it.  I find it at least as good and friendly as ten.  Setup has been going well with the help of some of the guys on these mailing lists.  Without them (one of the Genes, for one) it certainly wouldn't have been so smoothe.


Howard

On 8/4/2022 11:14 AM, JinYoun wrote:
Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 


Rosemarie Chavarria
 

I haven’t updated to windows 11 yet. I don’t know if I’ll be able to because I bought this computer in 2016.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JinYoun
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 

 


Monte Single
 

Hi,

 

No, I have not upgraded to win11 yet.

I think I’ll do it in the fall, after the major 22h2 version is released.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of JinYoun
Sent: August 4, 2022 10:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 


Monte Single
 

Hi Rosemarie,

If your pc has an intel processor, it willnot run win 11.

The oldest processor that win11 will work with with is the 8th generation I core cpu, which was released in 1017.

That’s fine.

Micro soft will support win10 until October of 2025.

Of course, win10 will continue to work after this time,  it will just not be officially supported.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: August 4, 2022 10:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

I haven’t updated to windows 11 yet. I don’t know if I’ll be able to because I bought this computer in 2016.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JinYoun
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 

 


Monte Single
 

Oh my, that should be 2017.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: August 4, 2022 11:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi Rosemarie,

If your pc has an intel processor, it willnot run win 11.

The oldest processor that win11 will work with with is the 8th generation I core cpu, which was released in 1017.

That’s fine.

Micro soft will support win10 until October of 2025.

Of course, win10 will continue to work after this time,  it will just not be officially supported.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: August 4, 2022 10:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

I haven’t updated to windows 11 yet. I don’t know if I’ll be able to because I bought this computer in 2016.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JinYoun
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 

 


mr Krit Kumar kedia
 

hi all,
actually, I have also not updated to windows 11 yet,
I was looking for some good feedback.
Also, I got to know that there are changes in the main navigation and GUI.
there are no major changes by the view of  new features,
so, right now I dont have a plan to update.

best,
Krit Kedia


On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 10:49 PM Monte Single <mrsingle@...> wrote:

Oh my, that should be 2017.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: August 4, 2022 11:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi Rosemarie,

If your pc has an intel processor, it willnot run win 11.

The oldest processor that win11 will work with with is the 8th generation I core cpu, which was released in 1017.

That’s fine.

Micro soft will support win10 until October of 2025.

Of course, win10 will continue to work after this time,  it will just not be officially supported.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: August 4, 2022 10:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

I haven’t updated to windows 11 yet. I don’t know if I’ll be able to because I bought this computer in 2016.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JinYoun
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 

 


Quentin Christensen
 

I needed a new PC so I'm now on Windows 11 (and for the same reason I can't give you a commentary on the upgrading experience or on how it runs on the same hardware).  Day to day, it works fine and isn't so different from Windows 10.  Many of the changes are "under the hood" with things like improved security.  There is a new (returned?) Widgets feature - basically a way of providing "live" information like news and weather without you needing to go into anything.  To be honest I've never really played with it too much.  The main day to day difference is the start menu.  I'm not sure why, but (personal opinion) Microsoft seem to be intent on making the start menu less useable with every version of Windows :)  You can still get to "all apps" for instance, but now it takes four keystrokes.  Basically either pin things you want to the taskbar, or use start menu search (press the Windows button, type what you want, eg "word" or "security" or "resume" (you can search for programs, settings, documents or just on the web, as you could in Windows 10).

If you're buying a new PC, then definitely get Windows 11.  If you're unsure about upgrading and don't need new hardware, then Windows 10 will continue to be supported until 2025, so you don't need to make a decision yet.  It does seem to work fine, although of course depending on exactly what programs you are using etc, your experience may differ.

Quentin.



On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 3:28 AM mr Krit Kumar kedia <kritparagkedia@...> wrote:
hi all,
actually, I have also not updated to windows 11 yet,
I was looking for some good feedback.
Also, I got to know that there are changes in the main navigation and GUI.
there are no major changes by the view of  new features,
so, right now I dont have a plan to update.

best,
Krit Kedia


On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 10:49 PM Monte Single <mrsingle@...> wrote:

Oh my, that should be 2017.

 

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Monte Single
Sent: August 4, 2022 11:15 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi Rosemarie,

If your pc has an intel processor, it willnot run win 11.

The oldest processor that win11 will work with with is the 8th generation I core cpu, which was released in 1017.

That’s fine.

Micro soft will support win10 until October of 2025.

Of course, win10 will continue to work after this time,  it will just not be officially supported.

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rosemarie Chavarria
Sent: August 4, 2022 10:30 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

I haven’t updated to windows 11 yet. I don’t know if I’ll be able to because I bought this computer in 2016.

 

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: JinYoun
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here. 

 



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


 
Edited

On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 06:45 PM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
If you're unsure about upgrading and don't need new hardware, then Windows 10 will continue to be supported until 2025, so you don't need to make a decision yet. 
-
While what you say is entirely true and correct, there are other factors to consider.  We're now past the 6 months after initial release and all indications, including yours, are that Windows 11 is quite stable and has not proven to be any more problematic than Windows 10 or 8.1.

One thing that constantly gets overlooked, and that I've had to deal with on these groups and in real life, is that there is a period where "everyone who's updated is in information sharing mode, and active information sharing," and this tends to be in the first year after a major release.  Answers tend to come fast and furious, to everyone's benefit.  After that period most who've upgraded or gotten a new machine with Windows 11 will be in coast mode, often not remembering how they accomplished something or that they even did something to make changes at all.

Then you also get into the fact that information that was 100% accurate when written can and does go stale fairly quickly, and then you have to plow through lots of information with an eye on when it was written, and whether it's still accurate multiple months later.  Windows As A Service, even though Feature Updates have now been slowed to once a year, is still a relatively rapidly changing environment.

Take the above into consideration if you are thinking about upgrading to Windows 11 or buying a new computer with Windows 11 on it.  We're no longer at the "bleeding edge" period and there are some advantages to being in the same boat with a lot of others.  Later on, you're more in your own rowboat rather than on a ship with many, many others.

By the way, due to my "hardware situation" I can't upgrade, and as a support tech I'm already running into certain situations where my knowledge of Windows 11 is behind what's current as a result.  And given the price of new computers with the worldwide chip shortage, I'm in no hurry to purchase a new computer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


Quentin Christensen
 

All true Brian, I must admit I was mostly thinking of those who either find the process of updating intimidating or just don't want to spend the time doing it if they don't have to.  And I can appreciate that, it does take a good amount of time.  I haven't done the upgrade on an existing machine to know how smoothly it runs.  Actually what I can say is with so much stuff stored on the cloud - OneDrive, Google Drive, etc, and passwords stored on the cloud - getting setup on a new machine is actually less painful these days than it used to be.  It still took say half a day of doing little else, a couple of days of working, but regularly having to stop and install a program I'd forgotten about, or retrieve something from a backup or off the old machine I'd forgotten about,  and then every now and then now I have to chase something.  But otherwise, yes, everything is running smoothly.

I would also say, since Windows 11 has been out for awhile now and is quite stable and accessible, if I had a Windows 10 machine which could take it, I'd rather upgrade now than in three years time - as you say, everyone else has been doing it recently, so whatever problem you run into, someone has probably worked out how to get around it recently enough to remember and be able to recount it to you - and if you do it now, you'll just have what you have now to move - in three years time, you'll have all that AND everything from that three years :)  And you'll be three years older!

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 9:10 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:
On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 06:45 PM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
If you're unsure about upgrading and don't need new hardware, then Windows 10 will continue to be supported until 2025, so you don't need to make a decision yet. 
-
While what you say is entirely true and correct, there are other factors to consider.  We're now past the 6 months after initial release and all indications, including yours, are that Windows 11 is quite stable and has not proven to be any more problematic than Windows 10 or 8.1.

One thing that constantly gets overlooked, and that I've had to deal with on these groups and in real life, is that there is a period where "everyone who's updates is in information sharing mode, and active information sharing," and this tends to be in the first year after a major release.  Answers tend to come fast and furious, to everyone's benefit.  After that period most who've upgraded or gotten a new machine with Windows 11 will be in coast mode, often not remembering how they accomplished something or that they even did something to make changes at all.

Then you also get into the fact that information that was 100% accurate when written can and does go stale fairly quickly, and then you have to plow through lots of information with an eye on when it was written, and whether it's still accurate multiple months later.  Windows As A Service, even though Feature Updates have now been slowed to once a year, is still a relatively rapidly changing environment.

Take the above into consideration if you are thinking about upgrading to Windows 11 or buying a new computer with Windows 11 on it.  We're no longer at the "bleeding edge" period and there are some advantages to being in the same boat with a lot of others.  Later on, you're more in your own rowboat rather than on a ship with many, many others.

By the way, due to my "hardware situation" I can't upgrade, and as a support tech I'm already running into certain situations where my knowledge of Windows 11 is behind what's current as a result.  And given the price of new computers with the worldwide chip shortage, I'm in no hurry to purchase a new computer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard



--
Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager


David Goldfield
 

My laptop initially shipped with Windows 10 Pro. I think I used it for a week or two and then decided to upgrade to Windows 11. I didn’t take notes on the process but I remember the upgrade being extremely uneventful. As Brian has correctly stated there will be periods of silence but during much of the time between screen readers I would just press control-Windows-enter to fire up Narrator which could then give me status updates on where I was during the update process.

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Quentin Christensen
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 7:53 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

All true Brian, I must admit I was mostly thinking of those who either find the process of updating intimidating or just don't want to spend the time doing it if they don't have to.  And I can appreciate that, it does take a good amount of time.  I haven't done the upgrade on an existing machine to know how smoothly it runs.  Actually what I can say is with so much stuff stored on the cloud - OneDrive, Google Drive, etc, and passwords stored on the cloud - getting setup on a new machine is actually less painful these days than it used to be.  It still took say half a day of doing little else, a couple of days of working, but regularly having to stop and install a program I'd forgotten about, or retrieve something from a backup or off the old machine I'd forgotten about,  and then every now and then now I have to chase something.  But otherwise, yes, everything is running smoothly.

 

I would also say, since Windows 11 has been out for awhile now and is quite stable and accessible, if I had a Windows 10 machine which could take it, I'd rather upgrade now than in three years time - as you say, everyone else has been doing it recently, so whatever problem you run into, someone has probably worked out how to get around it recently enough to remember and be able to recount it to you - and if you do it now, you'll just have what you have now to move - in three years time, you'll have all that AND everything from that three years :)  And you'll be three years older!

 

On Fri, Aug 5, 2022 at 9:10 AM Brian Vogel <britechguy@...> wrote:

On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 06:45 PM, Quentin Christensen wrote:

If you're unsure about upgrading and don't need new hardware, then Windows 10 will continue to be supported until 2025, so you don't need to make a decision yet. 

-
While what you say is entirely true and correct, there are other factors to consider.  We're now past the 6 months after initial release and all indications, including yours, are that Windows 11 is quite stable and has not proven to be any more problematic than Windows 10 or 8.1.

One thing that constantly gets overlooked, and that I've had to deal with on these groups and in real life, is that there is a period where "everyone who's updates is in information sharing mode, and active information sharing," and this tends to be in the first year after a major release.  Answers tend to come fast and furious, to everyone's benefit.  After that period most who've upgraded or gotten a new machine with Windows 11 will be in coast mode, often not remembering how they accomplished something or that they even did something to make changes at all.

Then you also get into the fact that information that was 100% accurate when written can and does go stale fairly quickly, and then you have to plow through lots of information with an eye on when it was written, and whether it's still accurate multiple months later.  Windows As A Service, even though Feature Updates have now been slowed to once a year, is still a relatively rapidly changing environment.

Take the above into consideration if you are thinking about upgrading to Windows 11 or buying a new computer with Windows 11 on it.  We're no longer at the "bleeding edge" period and there are some advantages to being in the same boat with a lot of others.  Later on, you're more in your own rowboat rather than on a ship with many, many others.

By the way, due to my "hardware situation" I can't upgrade, and as a support tech I'm already running into certain situations where my knowledge of Windows 11 is behind what's current as a result.  And given the price of new computers with the worldwide chip shortage, I'm in no hurry to purchase a new computer.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


 

--

Quentin Christensen
Training and Support Manager

 


 

On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 07:53 PM, Quentin Christensen wrote:
I haven't done the upgrade on an existing machine to know how smoothly it runs.
-
In the vast majority of cases, very smoothly.  It's pretty much like a typical Feature Update.  My general advice is to kick it off when you're about to retire for the night (or at least not planning to use your computer), make sure you get through the initial questions and answers, and there aren't many, and walk away when you're told the upgrade is in progress.

In way more than 9 times out of 10, the next morning you're at the login screen for Windows 11.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The difference between a top-flight creative man and the hack is his ability to express powerful meanings indirectly.

         ~ Vance Packard


 

Hi all,

And I can assure you that NVDA developers are constantly looking for ways to improve support for Windows 11 (including the upcoming feature update). Due to hard disk crash a few months ago, I have switched to a laptop running Windows 11 as my primary machine, but I keep Windows 10 virtual machines handy just in case I need to test changes on older operating systems.

To answer an earlier question: if Windows 11 is deemed compatible, you'll see a control named "download and install now" in Settings/Update and security/Windows update (on Windows 10).

As for feature updates: the next updates for both Windows 10 and 11 are being tested by Windows Insiders. Perhaps the biggest change in upcoming Windows 11 feature update is tweaks to Settings app. At the moment Microsoft and some Insiders are testing some exciting features coming in future updates.

Cheers,

Joseph


 

Hi all,

I can confirm David's and Brian's observation.

A few more things to consider:

  1. Feature update process in Windows 10 versus 11: while it wasn't the case until recently, Microsoft is using an enablement package approach for recent Windows 10 updates. This is why when updating from say, Windows 10 Version 21H1 to 21H2, it is done quickly as all the changes for the upcoming feature update become part of cumulative updates which will be turned on after installing the feature update. This is not the case when upgrading to Windows 11 as you are effectively telling Windows to do an in-place upgrade (replacing system files) provided that the hardwaer is compatible (this takes a while longer). While many people will get to do this once a year, there are folks who do this more frequently (daily for some Microsoft engineers, weekly for Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel).
  2. As David pointed out, you can start Narrator while the upgrade is in progress. Upgrading from Windows 10 to 11 (or for that matter, for Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel) is roughly divided into five steps: checking and downloading a new update (for Windows Insiders, builds), unpacking the new system files (technically a new Windows image), restarting and replacing system files, restarting again and transferring apps and settings, and final sign-in process and setup. You can fire up Narrator through all five phases, whereas you can use NVDA in all phases except steps 3 and 4.

Personally, I feel both excitement and dread whenever a new dev channel Insider Preview build is released, but that's for another time.

Cheers,

Joseph


David Goldfield
 

For those with an iOS or Android device I forgot to mention another very important tool in my toolbox that I can have available for those times when even Narrator may not fire up with the standard keyboard shortcut. I’m referring to text recognition apps, such as Envision AI or Seeing AI. Having these apps on standby can really help when you want to read what’s on your screen when other screen readers just aren’t available.

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 8:33 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11

 

Hi all,

I can confirm David's and Brian's observation.

A few more things to consider:

  1. Feature update process in Windows 10 versus 11: while it wasn't the case until recently, Microsoft is using an enablement package approach for recent Windows 10 updates. This is why when updating from say, Windows 10 Version 21H1 to 21H2, it is done quickly as all the changes for the upcoming feature update become part of cumulative updates which will be turned on after installing the feature update. This is not the case when upgrading to Windows 11 as you are effectively telling Windows to do an in-place upgrade (replacing system files) provided that the hardwaer is compatible (this takes a while longer). While many people will get to do this once a year, there are folks who do this more frequently (daily for some Microsoft engineers, weekly for Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel).
  2. As David pointed out, you can start Narrator while the upgrade is in progress. Upgrading from Windows 10 to 11 (or for that matter, for Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel) is roughly divided into five steps: checking and downloading a new update (for Windows Insiders, builds), unpacking the new system files (technically a new Windows image), restarting and replacing system files, restarting again and transferring apps and settings, and final sign-in process and setup. You can fire up Narrator through all five phases, whereas you can use NVDA in all phases except steps 3 and 4.

Personally, I feel both excitement and dread whenever a new dev channel Insider Preview build is released, but that's for another time.

Cheers,

Joseph


Brian's Mail list account
 

I'm exactly the same. The processor is about t two generations too old and it does not have the chip, although a friend of mine says that is easy to hack around, I'm not going to try it!
Brian

--
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rosemarie Chavarria" <knitqueen2007@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2022 5:30 PM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11


I haven’t updated to windows 11 yet. I don’t know if I’ll be able to because I bought this computer in 2016.







Sent from Mail for Windows



From: JinYoun
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 9:14 AM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11



Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11?
If yes, is it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10?
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here.


Brian's Mail list account
 

I agree with this one. However I still sometimes need a real person, and do not subscribe to Aira, as I cannot afford it, but many have had good results from be my eyes folk.


So for example if I take anytime upgrade from a 7 machine, one assumes you get 10, but since most are too old for 11 to work, that is basically the end of the line?
Brian

--
bglists@...
Sent via blueyonder.(Virgin media)
Please address personal E-mail to:-
briang1@..., putting 'Brian Gaff'
in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Goldfield" <david.goldfield@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2022 1:42 AM
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11


For those with an iOS or Android device I forgot to mention another very important tool in my toolbox that I can have available for those times when even Narrator may not fire up with the standard keyboard shortcut. I'm referring to text recognition apps, such as Envision AI or Seeing AI. Having these apps on standby can really help when you want to read what's on your screen when other screen readers just aren't available.

David Goldfield,
Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist
[JAWS Certified, 2022]<https://www.freedomscientific.com/Training/Certification>
NVDA Certified Expert<https://certification.nvaccess.org/>

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From: nvda@nvda.groups.io <nvda@nvda.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, August 4, 2022 8:33 PM
To: nvda@nvda.groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda] NVDA and windows 11


Hi all,

I can confirm David's and Brian's observation.

A few more things to consider:

1. Feature update process in Windows 10 versus 11: while it wasn't the case until recently, Microsoft is using an enablement package approach for recent Windows 10 updates. This is why when updating from say, Windows 10 Version 21H1 to 21H2, it is done quickly as all the changes for the upcoming feature update become part of cumulative updates which will be turned on after installing the feature update. This is not the case when upgrading to Windows 11 as you are effectively telling Windows to do an in-place upgrade (replacing system files) provided that the hardwaer is compatible (this takes a while longer). While many people will get to do this once a year, there are folks who do this more frequently (daily for some Microsoft engineers, weekly for Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel).
2. As David pointed out, you can start Narrator while the upgrade is in progress. Upgrading from Windows 10 to 11 (or for that matter, for Windows Insiders subscribed to dev channel) is roughly divided into five steps: checking and downloading a new update (for Windows Insiders, builds), unpacking the new system files (technically a new Windows image), restarting and replacing system files, restarting again and transferring apps and settings, and final sign-in process and setup. You can fire up Narrator through all five phases, whereas you can use NVDA in all phases except steps 3 and 4.

Personally, I feel both excitement and dread whenever a new dev channel Insider Preview build is released, but that's for another time.

Cheers,

Joseph


tim
 

I have win 10 on desk, because its not able to go higher.

And a laptop running win 11. Both using NVDA with no problems.

If you can upgrade. Then do so knowing it will work good, a little different but still windows.

If you can't upgrade. Then for a while your good until support stops.


On 8/4/2022 12:14 PM, JinYoun wrote:
Hi, I still haven't updated to windows 11 because of fears of it not working well as windows 10 and was curious if everyone else have updated to windows 11? 
If yes, is  it completely accessible with NVDA and do you find it better than windows 10? 
Thank you for any feedback on this. Hope this question is OK to ask on here.