NVDA Message


Dan TeVelde <dan.tevelde@...>
 

Hi All,

 

I’m not sure if this is the right place to ask this question. I am using a computer running Windows 10 with the latest version of NVDA. I am using a Ubantu distribution with Visual Studio and for the most part, things are working well. One issue I run into is that if I am in the terminal and type commands, I sometimes get a message from NVDA indicating there is too much output to announce. Generally, NVDA will read information once I type a command and press enter. I can also review terminal output using the up and down arrow keys with the control key. I haven’t found a way to move focus to the beginning of the most recent output from the terminal but can at least read the messages in reverse order from bottom to top. This is inefficient but I don’t know of a way around it.

 

I am having a related issue where NVDA will stop speaking if I type numerous commands and then press alt plus tab to open other applications like Chrome. Then NVDA sometimes won’t announce anything until I wait a few seconds or press alt and tab several times. If I am in Chrome, there might be silence if I am reviewing a web page containing output from the JavaScript Jasmine framework. I wonder what is happening.

 

Thanks,

Dan


 

Dan,

I can't speak at all to the Chrome issue, and I have a suggestion with regard to the WSL output.  If you know a command is likely to output far more lines of output than any screen reader is likely to handle gracefully, redirect the output to a file then open the file afterward for review.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

The real art of conversation is not only to say the right thing in the right place but to leave unsaid the wrong thing at the tempting moment.

        ~ Dorothy Nevill


Luke Davis
 

Brian Vogel wrote:

If you know a command is likely to output far more lines of output than any screen reader is likely to handle gracefully, redirect the output to a file then open the file afterward for review.
Agreed, or pipe it to less or more within WSL, or more on the outside.

bash -c 'ls -1 --recursive / | less'
or:

cmd
bash -c 'ls -1 --recursive /' | more

Luke