NVDA Remote


Glenn / Lenny
 

Hi All,
I am wondering if there is a way to remote two computers both running NVDA,
together in the same local network, without going through nvdaremote?
In other words, keep the connection within my LAN?
Thanks


 

Not unless you set up your own NVDA Remote Server (which can be done, but I can't give step-by-step details) within your own LAN space.

There is always an NVDA Remote Server acting as go-between, but where it happens to be located doesn't matter.  So if the server is on equipment in your own LAN, and you connect to that server, then, yes.  Otherwise, no.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Scratch most feminists and underneath there is a woman who longs to be a sex object. The difference is that is not all she wants to be.

    ~ Betty Rollin


Luke Davis
 

Glenn / Lenny wrote:

I am wondering if there is a way to remote two computers both running NVDA,
together in the same local network, without going through nvdaremote?
In other words, keep the connection within my LAN?
Yes, quite easily.

When you go to the NVDA remote Connect dialog (NVDA+N, T, E, C), set the first option to "server" instead of "client". It's a radio box, just press down arrow to change it.

Then, set the radio box for whether you want this machine to be the controller or the controlled.

Next set the "external IP address" to your machine's LAN IP address. That'll be something like 192.168.1.50 or 10.2.3.4 or some such.

Last, set the key as usual.

Then press OK.

On the other machine, set it up as normal (client mode), and set the NVDA Remote server to that same IP address as above, and the key to the same key.

Press OK, and you're done.

If you want to keep those settings on the server side, use the NVDA Remote options dialog to remember them.

Luke


Luke Davis
 

Brian Vogel wrote:

Not unless you set up your own NVDA Remote Server (which can be done, but I can't give step-by-step details) within your own LAN space.There is always an
NVDA Remote Server acting as go-between, but where it happens to be located doesn't matter.  So if the server is on equipment in your own LAN, and you
connect to that server, then, yes.  Otherwise, no.
I'm sorry Brian, but this is incorrect, on all counts.

This is what the server mode of the NVDA Remote add-on is for. See my other message. No intermediate service required.

Server mode exists to allow two copies of NVDA Remote to connect directly with each other, either on the local network, or via the internet, if you open the proper port in your firewall(s).

It is the NVDA Remote equivalent of a cross-over cable in networking.

Luke


 

On Tue, Apr 5, 2022 at 11:15 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
Then, set the radio box for whether you want this machine to be the controller or the controlled.
-
Luke,

First, thanks for the instructions.

Now, if you would, can you clear something up for me.  It sounds like the step before the one quoted is what sets up whichever machine you perform it on is what sets up a local NVDA Remote server within the LAN.  But if you use "controlled" in the above instruction, does that make the "server machine" pretty much it's own self-contained go-between server, as well as being controllable by the other machine?

I'm trying to understand how the controlled versus controller option would work in this context.

If it's completely separate from the server function, then it makes sense to me that the machine that's acting as the local server could be either the controller machine for the other, or the other machine would be controller and the server itself controlled from it.

It's really interesting that it's this easy to set up a local (as in contained within the same LAN) NVDA Remote server.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Scratch most feminists and underneath there is a woman who longs to be a sex object. The difference is that is not all she wants to be.

    ~ Betty Rollin


Luke Davis
 

Luke Davis wrote:

Next set the "external IP address" to your machine's LAN IP address. That'll be something like 192.168.1.50 or 10.2.3.4 or some such.
Actually, that step is unnecessary on the server side, unless you're doing this over the internet. Sorry.

Luke


Luke Davis
 

Brian Vogel wrote:

It sounds like the step before the one quoted is what sets
up whichever machine you perform it on is what sets up a local NVDA Remote server within the LAN.  But if you use "controlled" in the above instruction,
does that make the "server machine" pretty much it's own self-contained go-between server, as well as being controllable by the other machine?
Server vs. Client, and Controlled vs. Controller, are independent conditions from each other.

Just as a client machine can be controlled or the controller via an internet connection through nvdaremote.com, a local server mode setting on the add-on does not effect whether it is controlled or the controller.

I tried both of these during this sequence of emails, and with a single machine as server, I was both able to control it remotely, and cause it to control, the remote client.

All very straight forward, once you divorce the controlled/controlling concept from the client/server concept in your head.

The problem is that we tend to think of the machine doing the controlling as the client, and the machine being controlled as the server. But that is entirely arbitrary.

In fact the controller and the controlled are both clients of the server. In this case, the server just happens to be built into the client, so that the client to server path at one end is very short, and user-transparent.

At least, that's my practical understanding of it. Tyler can say if that's not how it really works internally.

Luke


 

On Tue, Apr 5, 2022 at 11:40 PM, Luke Davis wrote:
All very straight forward, once you divorce the controlled/controlling concept from the client/server concept in your head.
-
Agreed.  Hence the reason I asked.

Now it's clear that these two settings are disjoint from each other.  Thanks.
 
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

Scratch most feminists and underneath there is a woman who longs to be a sex object. The difference is that is not all she wants to be.

    ~ Betty Rollin