order of precedence?


Curtis Delzer
 

Hi all! The subject of this message may be confusing but . . .

Suppose you tell a synthesizer in NVDA to use your headphones, and then you go to the windows control panel and tell windows to use, (in my case with virtual audio cable) "line 1."

WHY does NVDA then go to the Microsoft sound mapper? I told NVDA to use my headphones and I assumed that it would ignore any other instruction but . . .

For a while I lost speech because Microsoft and their "trying to help" attitude assumed they knew best and then, their munificence allowed me to, reconnect something new to it and then make the MS mapper find that and vuala, I had speech again, and have it now.

In essence, I told the control panel to go to line one, and NVDA was instructed to use ms sound mapper which I did not authorize so, bingo, no speech. :)

I know how to avoid this but, it is obviously a situation where Microsoft knows best and overrides the setting in NVDA's interface to a synthesizer.

The way to avoid is to set a small program running shipped with virtual audio cable called "audio repeater and tell audio repeater to play from where you direct the sound too, to the place you wish to listen, in my case my headphones which are a sound card in their own right, as such. :)

So, anyone else who plays with sound can harken to the potential issue which is vital if you have no safety net to fall into, Microsoft knows best, not the developers of NVDA.  I trusted NVDA to speak from where I told it, even saved the settings but not was the case.


--
Curtis Delzer
H.S.
K6VFO
Rialto, CA
curtis@...


Tyler Spivey
 

Here's what's going on.
First, the Sound Mapper is simply your default audio device.
Let's say you tell NVDA to explicitly speak through the headphones. Here's how that works.

The audio system gives each device an ID. The synthesizer driver creates an audio player, and that player asks the system for the ID and stores it.
In the case of Sound Mapper, it never changes. This is important later.
Every time you want to speak some text, NVDA opens the audio device by ID, sends the audio and closes it again.

Now you go into the control panel and change the default audio device. The ID NVDA saved might not be accurate anymore, even though the name most likely is.
So NVDA is now going through the wrong device, until you get it to check again for the ID.
The easiest way to do this is to simply reload the synth, by hitting NVDA+Ctrl+s, enter.

NVDA could fix this by checking for the ID each time it speaks, or registering to be notified when the audio devices changed, but it doesn't, so we're stuck with the situation we have now.

On 9/17/2022 3:10 PM, Curtis Delzer wrote:
Hi all! The subject of this message may be confusing but . . .
Suppose you tell a synthesizer in NVDA to use your headphones, and then you go to the windows control panel and tell windows to use, (in my case with virtual audio cable) "line 1."
WHY does NVDA then go to the Microsoft sound mapper? I told NVDA to use my headphones and I assumed that it would ignore any other instruction but . . .
For a while I lost speech because Microsoft and their "trying to help" attitude assumed they knew best and then, their munificence allowed me to, reconnect something new to it and then make the MS mapper find that and vuala, I had speech again, and have it now.
In essence, I told the control panel to go to line one, and NVDA was instructed to use ms sound mapper which I did not authorize so, bingo, no speech. :)
I know how to avoid this but, it is obviously a situation where Microsoft knows best and overrides the setting in NVDA's interface to a synthesizer.
The way to avoid is to set a small program running shipped with virtual audio cable called "audio repeater and tell audio repeater to play from where you direct the sound too, to the place you wish to listen, in my case my headphones which are a sound card in their own right, as such. :)
So, anyone else who plays with sound can harken to the potential issue which is vital if you have no safety net to fall into, Microsoft knows best, not the developers of NVDA.  I trusted NVDA to speak from where I told it, even saved the settings but not was the case.


Curtis Delzer
 

right, so in order to find that command for NVDA, I must be focussed on it?

or is that command always available. If so, that might have saved my bacon today. :)

THANKS, since I did save the settings.


Curtis Delzer
H.S.
K6VFO
Rialto, CA
curtis@...

On 9/17/2022 4:02 PM, Tyler Spivey via groups.io wrote:
Here's what's going on.
First, the Sound Mapper is simply your default audio device.
Let's say you tell NVDA to explicitly speak through the headphones. Here's how that works.

The audio system gives each device an ID. The synthesizer driver creates an audio player, and that player asks the system for the ID and stores it.
In the case of Sound Mapper, it never changes. This is important later.
Every time you want to speak some text, NVDA opens the audio device by ID, sends the audio and closes it again.

Now you go into the control panel and change the default audio device. The ID NVDA saved might not be accurate anymore, even though the name most likely is.
So NVDA is now going through the wrong device, until you get it to check again for the ID.
The easiest way to do this is to simply reload the synth, by hitting NVDA+Ctrl+s, enter.

NVDA could fix this by checking for the ID each time it speaks, or registering to be notified when the audio devices changed, but it doesn't, so we're stuck with the situation we have now.


On 9/17/2022 3:10 PM, Curtis Delzer wrote:
Hi all! The subject of this message may be confusing but . . .

Suppose you tell a synthesizer in NVDA to use your headphones, and then you go to the windows control panel and tell windows to use, (in my case with virtual audio cable) "line 1."

WHY does NVDA then go to the Microsoft sound mapper? I told NVDA to use my headphones and I assumed that it would ignore any other instruction but . . .

For a while I lost speech because Microsoft and their "trying to help" attitude assumed they knew best and then, their munificence allowed me to, reconnect something new to it and then make the MS mapper find that and vuala, I had speech again, and have it now.

In essence, I told the control panel to go to line one, and NVDA was instructed to use ms sound mapper which I did not authorize so, bingo, no speech. :)

I know how to avoid this but, it is obviously a situation where Microsoft knows best and overrides the setting in NVDA's interface to a synthesizer.

The way to avoid is to set a small program running shipped with virtual audio cable called "audio repeater and tell audio repeater to play from where you direct the sound too, to the place you wish to listen, in my case my headphones which are a sound card in their own right, as such. :)

So, anyone else who plays with sound can harken to the potential issue which is vital if you have no safety net to fall into, Microsoft knows best, not the developers of NVDA.  I trusted NVDA to speak from where I told it, even saved the settings but not was the case.




Tyler Spivey
 

That command should always work.
NVDA+Ctrl+s brings up the synthesizer selection dialog, and enter just chooses whatever you already have selected. If you try that now, you should be right back where you left off.
If that doesn't work, you can try restarting NVDA. Assuming you haven't reassigned the shortcut, Alt+Ctrl+n will do that.
Both of these will cause NVDA to go through the audio device you set.

On 9/17/2022 4:26 PM, Curtis Delzer wrote:
right, so in order to find that command for NVDA, I must be focussed on it?
or is that command always available. If so, that might have saved my bacon today. :)
THANKS, since I did save the settings.
Curtis Delzer
H.S.
K6VFO
 Rialto, CA
curtis@...
On 9/17/2022 4:02 PM, Tyler Spivey via groups.io wrote:
Here's what's going on.
First, the Sound Mapper is simply your default audio device.
Let's say you tell NVDA to explicitly speak through the headphones. Here's how that works.

The audio system gives each device an ID. The synthesizer driver creates an audio player, and that player asks the system for the ID and stores it.
In the case of Sound Mapper, it never changes. This is important later.
Every time you want to speak some text, NVDA opens the audio device by ID, sends the audio and closes it again.

Now you go into the control panel and change the default audio device. The ID NVDA saved might not be accurate anymore, even though the name most likely is.
So NVDA is now going through the wrong device, until you get it to check again for the ID.
The easiest way to do this is to simply reload the synth, by hitting NVDA+Ctrl+s, enter.

NVDA could fix this by checking for the ID each time it speaks, or registering to be notified when the audio devices changed, but it doesn't, so we're stuck with the situation we have now.


On 9/17/2022 3:10 PM, Curtis Delzer wrote:
Hi all! The subject of this message may be confusing but . . .

Suppose you tell a synthesizer in NVDA to use your headphones, and then you go to the windows control panel and tell windows to use, (in my case with virtual audio cable) "line 1."

WHY does NVDA then go to the Microsoft sound mapper? I told NVDA to use my headphones and I assumed that it would ignore any other instruction but . . .

For a while I lost speech because Microsoft and their "trying to help" attitude assumed they knew best and then, their munificence allowed me to, reconnect something new to it and then make the MS mapper find that and vuala, I had speech again, and have it now.

In essence, I told the control panel to go to line one, and NVDA was instructed to use ms sound mapper which I did not authorize so, bingo, no speech. :)

I know how to avoid this but, it is obviously a situation where Microsoft knows best and overrides the setting in NVDA's interface to a synthesizer.

The way to avoid is to set a small program running shipped with virtual audio cable called "audio repeater and tell audio repeater to play from where you direct the sound too, to the place you wish to listen, in my case my headphones which are a sound card in their own right, as such. :)

So, anyone else who plays with sound can harken to the potential issue which is vital if you have no safety net to fall into, Microsoft knows best, not the developers of NVDA.  I trusted NVDA to speak from where I told it, even saved the settings but not was the case.





Brian's Mail list account
 

Yes I get similar problems using an hdmi cable to the tv, where it tries to play all sound to and in from the tv. I did try the over rides etc, but often after an update it all goes wrong again. In the end I used a hardware solution and bought a normal display adaptor socket to hdmi converter and disconnected the audio, Whalla,sound where I wanted it to go.
Brian

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Please address personal E-mail to:-
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in the display name field.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Curtis Delzer" <curtis@...>
To: <nvda@nvda.groups.io>
Sent: Saturday, September 17, 2022 11:10 PM
Subject: [nvda] order of precedence?


Hi all! The subject of this message may be confusing but . . .

Suppose you tell a synthesizer in NVDA to use your headphones, and then you go to the windows control panel and tell windows to use, (in my case with virtual audio cable) "line 1."

WHY does NVDA then go to the Microsoft sound mapper? I told NVDA to use my headphones and I assumed that it would ignore any other instruction but . . .

For a while I lost speech because Microsoft and their "trying to help" attitude assumed they knew best and then, their munificence allowed me to, reconnect something new to it and then make the MS mapper find that and vuala, I had speech again, and have it now.

In essence, I told the control panel to go to line one, and NVDA was instructed to use ms sound mapper which I did not authorize so, bingo, no speech. :)

I know how to avoid this but, it is obviously a situation where Microsoft knows best and overrides the setting in NVDA's interface to a synthesizer.

The way to avoid is to set a small program running shipped with virtual audio cable called "audio repeater and tell audio repeater to play from where you direct the sound too, to the place you wish to listen, in my case my headphones which are a sound card in their own right, as such. :)

So, anyone else who plays with sound can harken to the potential issue which is vital if you have no safety net to fall into, Microsoft knows best, not the developers of NVDA. I trusted NVDA to speak from where I told it, even saved the settings but not was the case.


--
Curtis Delzer
H.S.
K6VFO
Rialto, CA
curtis@...